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Full text of "Panama Canal record"

: 



Gift of the Panama Canal Museum 



y4 I^.SW- 



UNiV,gF_FL-M B ' 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalr13191920isth 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY UNDER 
THE AUTHORITY AND SUPER- 
VISION OF THE PANAMA CANAL 



AUGUST 20, 1919, TO AUGUST 11, 1920 



VOLUME XIII 

WITH INDEX 



c 

THE PANAMA CANAL 

KALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE 

1921. 



THE PANAMA CANAL PRESS 

MOUNT HOPE. CANAL ZONE 

1921. 



For additional copies of this publication address The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C-, or Balboa 
Heights, Canal Zone. 



INDEX. 



Abattoir and cold storage plant, 93. 

Absence — See Leave of. 

Acajutla, repairs, 427. 

Accidents, marine — See Marine accidents. 

Accountable officials, 20, 48, 88, 144, 162, 209, 

246, 285, 353, 383, 440, 465, 490, 502, 570, 

584, 596, 661, 760. 
Accounting Department, appointments, 88, 383, 

661. 
Act of Congress: 

Appropriations — 

Fiscal year 1920, 48. 
Army, 1920, 23. 708. 
Deficiency, 23, 231, 708. 
Fortifications, 1921, 706. 
Sundry Civil, 21, 692. 

Entrance of aliens, 228. 

Masonic Temple, Cristobal, 692. 

Prohibition of intoxicating liquors, 182. 
Admeasurements of vessels, 30, 449, 488, 528, 708. 
Administration Building, preservation of, 653. 
Administration of estates — See each issue. 
Administrators' sales, 329, 353, 693. 
Advance, aground off Aux Cayes, 233. 
Age limit, Civil Service, 351. 
Aids to navigation, 422. 
Aircraft, civilian, 252. 
Alaska Engineering Commission, utilizing Canal 

equipment, 563. 
Alfred Hoit & Company, trade route and sailing 

dates, 199, 460. 
Aliens: 

Entrance of, 228. 

Enemy, regulations, 372, 448, 513, 570. 
All-America Cables — See Cables. 
Allotments, for 1921, 642. 
American and Australian Line, 200, 460. 
American and Manchurian Line (Ellerman & 

Bucknall), 199, 460. 
American and Oriental Line, 199, 459. 
American Red Cross — See Red Cross. 
American Relief Administration, food drafts, 581. 
America, greatest gross tonnage, 371. 
American employees, loyalty during strike, 429. 
American seamen:. 

Appropriation for protection and relief, 707, 
708. 

See Governor's monthly reports. 
American vessels — See Governor's monthly re- 
ports. 
Ancon, naming of streets, 510, 628, 701. 
Annual reports, 88, 423, 643. 
Appointments — See various issues. 
Apprentice system, 259, 60S. 
Appropriations: 

American seamen, 707. 

Army, 1920, 23, 708. 

Available - July 1, 48. 642. 

Deficiency, 23, 231, 708. 

Fortifications, 706. 

Payment to Panama, 707. 



Appropriations — Continued: 

Sundry Civil, for 1920, 21. 

Sundry Civil, for 1921, 692. 
Arms, carrying, 495, 524, 653. 
Army transports, 4, 9, 160, 274, 371. 377, 490, 

543, 596, 599, 605. 
Army: 

Appropriation, 1920, 23; 1921, 708. 

Command, Panama Canal Department, 426. 

Census, 536. 

Correspondence, 1 1 7. 

Purchases from enlisted men, 448. 

Supplies from Canal, 629. 
Aspinwall Hotel, Taboga, 23, 606, 641, 667, 732. 

781, 782. 
Atlantic Fleet, visit, 371, 388, 647. 
Australian Line (A. & A.), 200, 460. 
Automobiles, 142, 207, 439, 440, 465, 780. 



Baggage, 5, 514, 654. 

Bakery, 41, 404, 550, 651. 

Balboa, fire on steamship, 252. 

Balboa shops and dry docks, facilities and work 
done, 176, 252, 325, 399, 575, 650, 711, 755, 
778 — See also Governor's monthly re- 
ports. 

Barber Line: 

Olockson, fire, salvage, rebuilding, 443, 453, 

491, 519. 
Trade routes and sailing dates, 199, 459. 

Bark towed from San Francisco to Atlantic 
Ocean, 226. 

Beef, prices, 11, 21, 193, 210, 313, 405, 442, 449. 
515. 529, 662. 

Bicycles, licenses, 142, 652. 

Bills against steamships, 400. 

Bills of health, 771. 

Bills of lading, for transshipment, 532. 

Blueprints. 103, 309. 

Board of Local Inspectors — See Steamship In- 
spection. 

Boat club, 55. 

Boilers, inspection, 528, 782. 

Bonded warehouses, 108. 

Bonds, conversion, 179, 207, 323, 424, 508. 659. 

Bones, 2,433 tons in one cargo, 767. 

Bonus, included in estimates for 1921. 30. 

Books: 

Library and clubhouses, 732. 
Commissary, 129, 272, 426, 653. 

Boston, new freight service, 658. 

Boxing and prize fighting prohibited, 670. 

Bread, 404, 651. 

British Columbia, distance to Victoria and Prince 
Rupert, 126. 

Bubonic plague, 260, 655, 658. 

Building construction — See Governor's monthly 
reports. 

Bumboats, regulations, 701. 

Bunkers — See Coal, oil. 

Business of Canal — See Governor's monthly re- 
port. 



INDEX 



Cable censorship, Honduras, Salvador, 592. 
Cables: 

Australia, 10. 
Change of name, 453. 
China and Siberia cable, 20. 
Costa Rica, 61. 
Guam and Philippines, 130. 
Haiti and San Domingo, 162. 
Honduras, 61. 
Manila-Shanghai, 20. 
Tahiti, 782. 

West Indies and British Guiana, 286. 
Cable office, Balboa, 636. 
Cajacet, tolls applied, 519. 
California fruit, cargo, 72. 
Callao, German vessel overhauled at Canal shops, 

315. 
Cape Mala, high winds, January, 1920. 429. 
Captain of Port— See Port Captain. 
Carawa, foundered ship, crew, 603. 
Carboys, glass, sale, 162. 
Cargo: 

Statements analyzing cargoes are published 
in each issue, and in the monthly 
reports of the Governor. In addi- 
tion are the following special notes — 
Average, first half year, 373. 
Bones, coconut oil, creosote, 767. 
Distribution over 6 months, 355. 
Declarations, 112. 
Largest cargo, 270. 
Oil, lubricating, 520. 
Origin and destination, 202. 236, 302, 

344. 433, 482, 560, 621, 684, 752. 
Pipes, 52C. 
Tolls, charged and remitted — SeeMonth- 

ly reports. 
Tolls, per ton carried, 519. 
Transfer, between vessels, 388. 
Transfer routing, 532. 
Carib Trading Company, Colombia, 633. 
Cartagena, formerly Orolina, passenger service, 

647. 
Cartagena, freight and passenger tariffs, 360, 436. 
Cattle Industry. 83, 104, 184, 654. 
Cement sweepings, 31, 286. 

Census of the Canal Zone, 100, 265, 286, 536,'728. 
Censorship, cable, 592. 
Central and South American Telegraph Co., 438, 

453. 
Chagres River, stages of — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Chame, sale of tug. 72. 

Chandlery, 52, 65, 114. 227, 270, 282, 392, 444, 
496, 580, 636, 704, 778— See also Governor's 
nonthly reports. 
Chauffeurs, licensing of, 439, 465. 
Children: 

Books, 732. 

Employment of school, 426. 
Insufficiently nourished, 242. 
Not permitted, on counters at commissaries, 
396. 
Chile Steamship Company, trade route and sailing 
date, 457. 



Chilean Line: — See South American Steamship 

Company. 
Chinese, dry-docking steamer Hwah Jah, 687. 
Cholera, quarantine, 769, 773. 
Citrus fruit, nursery stock for sale, 703. 
Civil Service: 

Age limit, 351. 

Examinations — Sec each issue. 
Instructions of candidates, 382. 
Reinstatement employees discharged from 

military service, 351. 
Reopening of examinations held during 

war, 6. 
Retirement act, general provisions, 716. 
Civil war veterans, 13. 

Clay, use of local clay at Balboa shops, 659. 
Clubhouses: 

Library, 732. 

Membership discontinued, 87. 
No longer connected with Y. M. C. A., 364. 
Coal: 

Analysis of business — See Governor's month- 
ly reports. 
Prices, 11, 21, 136, 188, 193, 210, 313, 405, 

442, 449, 515, 529, 662. 695. 
Private depots, 531. 
Shortage, 105, 620, 721, 755, 767. 
Coaling facilities, 1. 
Coaling record, 163. 
Coastwise service: 

Beginning of, by Pacific Mail Co., 134. 
Carib Trading Co., 633. 
Luckenbach service to be re-established, 563. 
Luckenbach service resumed, 650, 768. 
West coast, 189, 377, 392, 533, 590, 715. 
Coastwise trade — See Governor's monthlyreports. 
Coco Solo, Naval Reservation, 582. 
Coconut oil, cargo from Tahiti, 767. 
Codes, use of, in communication with Canal, 485. 
Coffee, pioposals for furnishing, [246. 
Cold storage plant: 

Abattoir and cold storage, Mouut Hope, 93. 
Pedro Miguel, 53. 
Prices, 89. 
Cold storage goods — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Collections, tolls, new record for, 179. 
Collector, 88, 400, 440. 
Colombia — 

Lifting quarantine against Atlantic ports, 

691. 
Motor vessel Cartagena to be used on Atrato- 

River, 647. 
Steamship service, 633. 
Colombian Maritime Steamship- Company, Lim- 
ited; trade route and sailings, 197, 459. 
Colon Harbor, 456. 

Commercial museums, Japanese steamer, 761. 
Commissary books, 129, 272, 426. 
Commonwealth and Dominion Line, 200, 460. 
Commonwealth Government Line, 200, 460. 
Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French 

Line), 198, 201, 458, 462. 
Compaiiia Sud-Americana de Vapores — See South 

American Steamship Co. 
Compania Transatlantica de Barcelona (Spanish 
Line), 201, 462. 



INDEX 



Complaints, Board, 705. 

Concrete shipCapeFear repaired at Cristobal, 456. 
Conditions of employment, amendment of Execu- 
tive order, 271. 
Conductors. Panama Railroad, service conditions, 

272. 
Consular and diplomatic corps, accredited to 

Republic of Panama, 62. 
Contagious diseases: 

Quarantine, 768. 

Persons having, 254. 
Corozal Hospital, rates of pay for silver em- 
ployees, 162. 
Corre. c pondense: 

Cffic'al. 103. 

Army and Navy Headquarters, 117. 
Costs, expenses, and revenues, 121. 
Costa Rica, steamship service, 592. 
Codrts, Executive Order concerning costs, 367. 
Cranes, rates for services of, 528. 
Creosote, whole cargo, 767. 
Crew lists, incoming vessels, 131. 
Cristobal, steamship: 

Passage, 504. 

Returned to regular passenger service, 700. 

Trial trip, 452. 
Cristobal harbor, spar buoys discontinued, 422. 
Crown ofCalicia, fire, 252. 
Cruises, tourist, 55. 
Cuba, traffic with west coast, 533. 
Cuba, steamship, 599, 761. 
Culebra, return to dredging, 83. 
Customs: 

Admission to docks, 127. 

Fees for special service, 5, 134. 

Inspecting and sealing freight for employees, 
514. 
Czecho-SIovak soldiers aboard Mount Vernon, 

599,607.631. 



Danger in filtering gasoline through chamois 

skins, 230. 
Defenses of the Canal, photographs and informa- 
tion, 734. 
DeLesscps, tug, sale, 162, 246. 
Demotion ratings, 262. 
Dentists, 7, 323, 327, 728. 
Departmental tariff "A," 731. 
Diesel oil, 508, 587, 636, 716. 
Dillwyn, cargo lubricating oil, 520. 
Diplomatic Corps, 62, 313. 
Directory : 

Diplomatic and Consular Corps, 62, 313. 

The Panama Canal, 119, 195. 

Telephone, 179, 567, 592. 
Diseases: 

Contagious, to be reported, 243. 

Quarantinable, 373, 772. 
Disinfection of vessels and cargoes, 423, 775. 
Distances: 

Ports from the Canal, 89, 100, 126. 

Saved by using Canal, 590. 
Docking, charges, 177. 
Docks, admission, 127. 

Dollar Line, Atlantic-Par East Service, 592. 
Dreadnought, tug, transits Canal, 377. 



Dredging— .Sty Governor's monthly reports. 
Dredge Corozal, sale, 189. 
Dry docks: 

Balboa, 176, 325, 579. 

Three ships dry-docked together, 575. 

See also Governor's monthly reports. 
Dry season: 

Driest since American occupation, 668. 

Rainfall records, 668. 
Dutch Steamship Line: 

See Royal Dutch West India Mail Steamship 
Company. 

See Royal Netherlands Steamship Co. 

See Stoomvarts Mattschappe Nederland. 

See Rotterdamsche Lloyd. 
Duties, free entry requests, 49, 243, 249. 440. 



Earthquakes, 462, 639. 

Eclipse of sun, 161. 

East Asiatic Company, 198, 199, 457, 458, 460. 

Elections, Republic of Panama, 759. 

Electric lamps, shortage, 143. 

Electric trucks and spare parts, 396. 

Electrical work — See also Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Electrolyte, sale. 31. 
Ellerman & Bucknall, 199, 460. 
Emerald, yacht, 587. 
Employees, gold roll: 

Bills, payment, 425, 718. 

Conditions of employment, 262, 271. 

Complaints, board, 705. 

Coupon books to new, 653. 

Deceased — See each issue. 

Free entry and freight privileges, 49, 243, 
249. 

Hospital treatment, 253. 

Jurors and witnesses, 231. 

Leave status, 60, 209, 246, 629, 708, 709. 

Military service, 489, 513. 

Private work, 30, 103, 464. 

Quarters, 20, 60, 328, 425, 489, 782. 

Retirement Act, 716. 

Switch keys, 61. 

Transportation, 227, 437, 542, 596, 605. 

War relief kind, 48. 

Working at night, school, 180. 

Working force, numbers — See Governor's 
monthly reports. 
Employees, silver roll: 

Change of status, 262, 642. • 

Governor's address, 388. 

Increase in pay, 364. 

Issue of commissary books. 272. 

Maximum wages, 465. 

Promotion, 488, 643. 

Re employment of strikers, 425. 

Settlement at Las Cascadas, 170, 243. 
Employment, school children, 426. 
Enemy aliens: 

Passing through Canal Zone, 372, 448, 570. 

Vessels acquisition, 285. 

Travel regulations, 513. 
Engineer depot, 357. 
Engine lathe, sale, 263. 



INDEX 



Engi i. i ; : 

Junior, examination for, 563, 571. 
Locomotive, service conditions for, on Pana- 
ma Railroad, 272. 
Equipment, office, 171. 
Estimates for 1921, bonus included, 30. 
Excavation, amount of — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Eten, ex-German vessel overhauled at Balboa 

shops, 315. 
Executive Orders: 

Acquisition of vessels of hostile nations, 285. 
Admission foreign-built ships to American 

registry, 442. 
Civil Service, 13, 351. 
Carrying and keeping of arms, 495. 
Charges for services rendered by quarantine 

division, 423. 
Conditions of employment for permanent 

force, 271. 
Costs and security for costs in district and 

magistrates' courts in Canal Zone, 367. 
Fort Amador and Fort Grant reservations. 

14. 
Fort Randolph, France Field, and Coco Solo 

reservations, 582. 
Fort Clayton, 357. 
Fort William D. Davis, 364. 
Instruction of candidates for classified service, 

382. 
Liquor regulations on Canal Zone, 365. 
Maximum salary for silver employees, 465. 
Obtaining vessels and equipment from Navy, 

437. 
Punta Mala Naval radio station, 484, 501. 
Quarry Heights Reservation, 324. 
Registry of foreign-built vessels, 48. 
Reinstatement of war veterans in classified 

service, 351. 
Veterans of Civil War, leave of absence, 13. 
Expenses, compared with revenues, 121. 



Farm implements, sale, 263. 
Farm and pastures, live stock, 104. 
Favorite, lighthouse tender and salvage ship, 467. 
Federal Steam Navigation Company, 200, 461. 
Fiji Islands, distance, 100. 

Financial receipts and expenditures — See Gover- 
nor's monthly reports. 
Fire apparatus, right of way, 488. 
Fires in ships: 

Balboa, 252. 

Firivood, 275. 

Galicia, 252. 

Marne, 331, 371, 443, 491. 

Olockson, 443, 452, 491, 519. 
Firearms, 495, 524, 653. 
Firwood, steamship, fire, 276. 
Fish, Gatun Lake, 703. 
Fleet, passage, 371, 388, 647. 
floating pile drivers, 440, 465. 
Flour shipments — See Governor's monthly reports. 
F ood drafts for the relief of central and eastern 

Europe, 581. 
Food, sales— See Governor's monthly reports. 
Ford cars, bumpers for, sale of, 263. 



Foreign vessels, acquisition, 285. 

Foreman's orders, 129. 

Fort Amador, 14. 

Fort Clayton, 259, 357. 

Fort William D. Davis, 364. 

Fort Grant, 14. 

Fort Randolph, 209, 582. 

Fortifications: 

Appropriations 1921, 706. 

Photographs and information, 734. 
Forwarding agency at New York, 514. 
Foundry: 

Description of foundry at Balboa shops, 1 76. 

Using local clay for steel molding, 659. 

See also Governor's monthly report. 
Fourth of July, 666, 667, 670. 
France Field, 582. 

Free entry requests, 49, 243, 249, 440. 
Freight shipments, employees' goods, 209. 
Freight tariffs — See Tariffs. 

French, visit of Fiench cruiser Je ami e a" Arc, 331. 
French Line — See Compagnie Generate Trans- 

atlantique. 
Fruit cargo from California, 72. 
Fruits, shipments of — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Fuel oil: 

Conservation, 620, 721, 755, 767. 

Contract for 1,000,000 barrels, 99. 

Monthly statements — .See Governor's month- 
ly reports. 

Prices, 11, 21, 134, 193. 206, 210, 223, 313, 
405, 442, 449, 508, 515, 529, 662, 716. 

Record transactions during March, 531. 

Sales to ships. 587. 
Fumigation, 655, 658, 777. 
Fusible plugs, 466. 



Gaii.lard Cut: 

Surges and currents, 164. 

Slide at Cucaracha, 444, 451. 
Garages, rules, 710. 
Gasoline: 

Average monthly sales to ships. 587 — .See 
also Governor's monthly reports. 

Danger in filtering, 230. 
Gatun Lake: 

Fish caught, 703. 

Storage for dry season, 189, 628, 668, 758. 

Surges and currents, 164. 

Stages of — See Governor's monthly reports. 
German ships: 

Purchased by Panama Railroad, 399. 

First through Canal, 275. 

From Chile, 604. 

Overhauling of ex-German ships, 67. 

Status of vessels overhauled at Balboa shops, 
315. 
Governor's monthly reports, July, 53; August, 

73; September, 147; October, 213; No- 
vember, 291; December, 332; January, 407; 

February, 468; March, 545; April, 607; 

May, 671; June, 737. 
Great Northern, transport, 543. 
Health, public — See Quarantine, Governor's 

monthly reports, hospitals. 



INDEX 



Hodge Ship Company, 372, 457, 578. 603. 
Holidays: 

Schedule of trains, 20, 144, 262. 666, 667, 670. 

School, 192, 259. 
Holland-American Line, 200, 460. 
Holt & Company, 199, 460. 
Hospitals: 

Canal Zone garrisons, 7C8. 

Highways. 510. 

Quarters, 425. 

Rates and regulations, 253. 

Rates to shipping and allied interests, 267. 

Visiting hours, 8, 289, 406, 645. 
Hotels: 

Aspinwall — See Aspinwall Hotel. 

Rates to shipping interests. 508. 



H 



Joint Commission — Continued: 

Awards, 9, 130, 209, 262, 274. 

Certificates of disagreements, 9, 328, 442. 

Decisions of the Umpire, 9, 21, 31, 56, 514, 
584, 629. 

Rules of dismissal, 9, 130, 193, 262, 273, 286. 
311,328,354,441. 
Junior engineer, examinations, 563, 571. 
Jurors and witnesses, 231. 
Jury list, 528. 



K 



Kilpatrick, transport, 4. 

Koyo Maru, aground at Serrana Bank, 663, 687, 
697, 726, 728. 755, 761. 



Household goods, shipment, 51 i, 654. 
Huasco, steamship, dry-docked, 505. 
Hunting, restriction. 17, 177, 653. 
Hydroelectric station — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Hwah J ah, steamship, at Balboa dry dock, 687. 



Ice: 



Increase in price, 384. 

Plant at Mount Hope. 95. 

Sales — See Governors' monthly reports. 
Importation of dutiable goods, 49, 243, 249, 440. 
Income tax returns. 444. 
Indexes and bound volumes of The Panama 

Canae Record, 245. 
Influenza: 

See Governor's monthly reports. 

Quarantine against, 373. 
Inspections: 

Baggage, 5. 

Boilers. 528, 782. 

Household goods, 514. 

Quarantine, 392, 423, 508, 642. 

Watches, 60. 
Intoxicating liquors — See Liquors. 
Insurance in the Canal Zone 593. 
Iron rods and bars, production at Balboa shops, 

650. 
Isthmian Steamship Lines, trade route and inter- 
vals of sailing, 461. 
Italian Steamship Lines — See La Veloce Naviga- 

zione Italiana a Yapore (La Veloce Line): 

Transatlantica Italiana; Societa Nazionale di 

Navigazione. 



Japanese: 

Cruiser Yakitma. 355, 3, >. 

Cruiser Kasaga, 768. 

Steamship lines using Canal. 199, 201 459, 
460, 462. 
Jeanne a" Arc, visit of French cruiser, 331. 
Johnson Line, 198, 19=), 457. 458. 
Joint Commission: 

Appointment of H. A. A. Smith as member of, 
383. 



Labor trains. 72. 144, 162. 

Laboratory schedule, charges, 258. 

La Pita, spur track, 140. 

Land awards — See Joint Commission. 

Largest ship through Canal, 160, 371, 467. 

Las Cascadas, settlement for silver employees, 

170, 243. 
Latin-American traffic — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Laundry service — See Governor's monthly reports. 

and 188. 
La Veloce Navigazione Italiana a Vapore (La 

Veloce Line). 189, 198. 201. 252, 458. 461. 
Laws, police to cooperate with inspectors, 643. 
Leave of absence — See Employees. 
Leprosy, general quarantine precautions against. 

770, 775. 
Leyland and Harrison Lines, 201, 462. 
Liberty Bonds: 

Conversion, 179, 207, 323, 424, 508, 659. 

Raffles, 732. 
Library, expansion, 732. 
Licenses, automobile, motorcycle, and bicycle. 

142, 207, 438, 465, 652, 780. 
Life insurance, repoit of business, 593. 
Lighthouses: 

Toro Point, color of tower to be change 1. 28 

Reservation, Roncador cay, Carinbean Sea. 
44. 

Riprapping to protect bases of range light 
towers, 71. 

Toro Point lighthouse, color of light changed. 
28. 
Lighthouse tender Favorite transferred to the 

Canal, 467. 
Lights: 

Canal, established, 53. 

Gatun Lake section, 521. 

Roncador Bank, 25, 43. 

Toro Point lighthouse, color changed, 28. 
Lightning damage, 139. 

Lima, steamship, repaired at Balboa shops. 427. 
Lines through Canal, services in regular opera- 
tion, 197, 457. 
Liquid fuels — See fuel oil. 
Liquors: 

Act of Congress prohibiting in Canal Zone, 
182. 



INDEX 



Liquors — Continued : 

Executive Order relative to sale, possession, 
etc, 365. 

Physician's permit to prescribe, 380. 

Regulations, circular No. 173, 379. 
Live stock, pastures and farms, 104. 
Locks: 

Fence on west side of Pedro Miguel, 171. 

Record lockage, 491, 494. 

Suspension of crossing at Pedro Miguel, 377. 

See also Governor's monthly reports. 
Locomotive engineers, service conditions, 272. 
Longest ship through Canal, 160. 
Lubricating oil, cargo of, 520. 
Luckenbach Line, 200, 563, 650, 768. 
Lumber: 

Native, 315, 404, 670. 

Shipments of — See Governor's monthly re- 
ports. 



M 



Magistrates' Courts, costs and security for 

costs, 367. 
Mail: 

Army headquarters, 117. 

C. O. D. parcels, 383. 

Count of, 129. 

Handling, Las Cascadas, 311. 

Quartermaster, Ancon-Balboa District, 259. 

Reopening, 9. 

Ships in port, 112. 
Malaria, 509, 640 — See also Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Manchurian Line, 199, 460. 
Marine accidents:' 

Burning steamship Firwood, 275. 

Burning and salvaging of steamship Marne, 
331, 355. 371, 443, 491. 

Burning and salvaging of steamship Olockson, 
443, 452, 491, 519. 

Fire, Crown ofGalicia and Balboa, 252. 

Foundering of steamship Caravia, 603. 

Grounding of steamship Advance, 233. 

Grounding and salvaging of steamship Koyo 
Maru, 663, 687, 697, 726, 761. 

Loss of yacht Rosina, 306. 

Scope of investigations by Board of Local 
Inspectors, 165, 599, 642. 
Marine Division, work performed — See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
Marne, steamship, 331, 355, 427, 443, 491, 687. 
Manifests of cargo, 99. 
Maple Leaf Line, 199, 459. 
Marendaz Steamship and Tourist Agency, 638. 
Materials and supplies — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Masonic Temple building, Cristobal, 692. 
Meal tickets, increase in cost, 130. 
Meals, reimbursement for, 48. 
Meats, no restrictions against sale of, 514. 
Mechanical Division shops: 

Native lumber operations, 404. 

Overhauling of two former German vessels, 
315. 

School for apprentices, 259, 605. 

Use of local clay at foundry, 659. 



Mechanical Division shops — Continued: 

Work performed — See Governor's monthly 
reports. 
Medical treatment: 

Canal Zone garrisons, 708. 

Rates and regulations, 253. 

Rates to shipping and allied interests, 267. 
Merchants Line, 392. 
Merchants Line (W. R. Grace & Co.), trade route 

and sailing dates, 197, 457. 
Metal checks, 240, 261, 311. 
Meteorology and hydrography, work performed — 

See Governor's monthly reports. 
Mileage books, sale of, to employees and soldiers, 

542. 
Military and Naval reservations: 

Coco Solo, 582. 

Fort Amador, 14. 

Fort Clayton, 357. 

Fort William D. Davis, 364. 

Fort Grant, 14. 

Fort Randolph, 582. 

France Field, 582. 

Punta Mala Radio Station, 485, 501. 

Quarry Heights, 324. 
Military service: 

Former employees to be reinstated on appli- 
cation, 513. 

Status of employees returning regarding 
quarters, 489. 
Miraflores, sale of tug, 330, 396, 405, 442, 597, 

644, 654, 662. 
Misdirected letters — See each issue. 
Ml. Vernon, transport, longest ship, 160, 599. 
Mormon colony, sugar machinery, 508. 
Mosquitoes, 309, 777. 
Motor ships through Canal — See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
Motor cars, rates for use of railroad, 183. 
Motor vessel, equipped for passenger service, 647. 
Motor transportation, rates for, 261. 490, 670. 
Motor vehicles, 142, 207, 438, 440, 465, 780. 
Movements of ocean vessels — See each issue. 
Moving pictures, 191, 758. 
Municipal Engineering — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 



IS1 



Nationality of commercial ships through Canal — 

See Governor's monthly reports. 
Native lumber, 315, 404. 
Nautilus Steam Shipping Company (Old Gulf 

Line), 198, 458. 
Naval radio stations, 322. 373, 485, 501, 703. 
Naval Reservation, Coco Solo, 582. 
Navassa Island, general information about, 173. 
Navigation regulations: 

Speed of vessels in Canal, 323. 

Rafts in Canal waters, 761. 
Navy, United States: 

Atlantic Fleet, 371, 388, 647. 

Census of, on Canal Zone, 536. 

Mail addressed to headquarters on Isthmus, 
117. 

Obtaining vessels and equipment from Navy, 
437. 



INDEX 



Navy, United States — Continued: 

Special quarantine regulations for Navy ves- 
sels, 775. 
New Gatun, concrete railroad station, 524. 
New Orleans, direct passenger service, 658. 
New Orleans and South American Steamship 

Company, 198. 457, 590. 
New York and South American Line (United 

States Steel Products Co.), 198. 
New Zealand Shipping Company, trade route and 

sailing dates, 200, 460. 
New Zealand: 

Courtesies to troops, 206. 

Visit of British battle cruiser, 243. 
Nippon Yusen Kabushiki Kaisha Line, 199, 460. 
Nitrate, 92, 371— See also Governor's monthly 

reports. 
North and South Atlantic Line of Bergen, 715. 
Norton, Lilly & Company, 199, 460. 
Norway-Pacific Line, 199, 459. 
Norwegian Line, new line to west coast, 715. 
Notaries Public, 242, 271, 691, 734. 
Notices to Mariners: 

Lights established, Panama Canal, 53. 

Light, Roncador Bank, Caribbean Sea, 25, 
43. 

Light. Serrano Bank, 92, 112. 

Naval Radio Station, Puerto Obaldia, 322, 
373. 

Obstructions to navigation, 291. 

Range lights changed from flashing to fixed, 
521. 

Spar buoys discontinued in Cristobal harbor, 
422. 

Speed of vessels in Canal, 323. 

Temporary wreck light established on Marne, 
356. 

Toro Point lighthouse, color of light changed, 
28. 
Notices to steamship lines: 

Canal ports not to be considered bunkering 
ports for fuel only, 620. 

Crew lists for incoming vessels, 131. 

Limitation coal requirements, 105. 

Fuel situation, 721, 755. 



Obstructions to navigation, Notice to Mariners, 

291. 
Officials, directory of: 

Diplomatic and Consular, 62, 313. 

Panama Canal, 119, 195. 

Panama Railroad, 120, 196. 
Oil: 

Average monthly sale of crude, 587. 

Can not be supplied ships calling merely for 
fuel, 620. 

Diesel, 508, 587, 636, 716. 

Contract for 1,000,000 barrels, 99. 

Current prices on, 11, 21, 193, 210, 313, 405, 
442, 449, 515, 529, 662. 

Policy re private storage depots, 531. 

Prices 134, 206, 223, 313, 508, 716. 

Rationing of fuel supply, 721. 

Record transactions during March, 531. 

Sales to ships, 587. 

Sales of — See Governor's monthly reports. 

See also Fuel oil and Dit sel oil. 



Olockson, burning and salvaging of, 443, 452, 491, 
519, 

Opening of the Panama Canal, Proclamation by 
President, 737. 

Operations, monthly statement of — See Gover- 
nor's monthly reports. 

Orca, largest cargo through Canal, 270. 

Ores, shipment — See Governor's monthly reports. 

Oriental Line (A. & O.) , 199, 459. 

Orolina, sold, name changed to Cartagena, 647. 

Osaka Shosen Kaisha Line, 199, 460. 



Pacific Mail Steamship Co.: 

Sailings of steamship Cuba, 761. 
Acajulla repaired at Balboa shops, 427. 
Around the world service from San Francisco, 

533. 
Coastwise service through the Canal, 134. 
Developing traffic between Cuba and West 

Coast, 533. 
Five new passenger ships for Trans-Pacific 

service, 711. 
Freight tariff from Cartagena to San Fran- 
cisco, 436. 
Regular service between San Francisco and 

Habana, 633. 
Sachem renamed the Cuba, 599. 
Semimonthly service between Cuba and 

Costa Rica, 592. 
Temporary one-way service, Baltimore to 

Pacific Coast, 687. 
Pacific Metals Corporation, 197, 459. 
Pacific Steam Navigation Company: 

Freight and passenger service up West Coast, 

592. 
Guatemala brings crew of foundered Carawa, 

603. 
Orca carried largest cargo through Canal, 270, 
Orcoma carries 575 passengers through Canal, 

578. 
Trade routes and sailng dates, 197, 198,457, 

458, 459. 
Pacific terminal, connecting steamship lines, 201, 

462. 
Paita, Peru, quarantine restrictions account of 

plague, 658. 
Paita, steamship, completion, 67. 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line: 

Advance aground off Aux Cayes, 233. 
Allianca, not to go to New Orleans, 605. 
Cristobal, rebuilt, 452, 504, 559, 700. 
List of steamers, accommodations thereon, 

etc, 399. 
Passenger congestion relieved, 227. 
Purchase of ex-German ships, 399. 
Schedule of sailings, 171, 596, 760. 
Service to Arlantic ports of Colombia, 587, 

663. 
Shipment of uncrated trunks, 654. 
Trade routes and sailing dates, 201, 461. 
Transportation for employees, 437. 
Transportation on steamship Cristobal, 760. 
Passenger rates to Colombian ports, 780. 
Freight tariffs — See Tariffs. 
Panama, Republic of, 707, 759. 
Panama silver coins, exportation of, 272. 



10 



INDEX 



Pascougoula, Miss., shipping through Canal. fOA- 
Passengers: 

See Governor's monthly reports. 

Congestion on Panama Railroad steamers, 
227. 

Inspection of baggage, 5, 134. 

Travel regulations, 372, 448, 570. 

Quarantine regulations, 772. 

Nondepender.t relative* of employees, 227. 
Passes, annual, Panama Railroad, 272, 383. 
Passports: 

Fees for passports and visas, 726. 

Travel regulations, 372, 448, 570. 

Unnecessary for employees going to and from 
States, 372. 
Pastures and farms, livestock, 104. 
Pearl Islands, excursion, 659, 667. 
Percival S. Parks, small ship from New York to 

Tahiti. 179. 
Permits: 

Peddler's, 44. 

Physician's, to prescribe liquor, 380. 

Runners and bumboatmen, 701. 

To carry arms and keep same, 495, 524, 653. 
Pershing, Gen. John J., visit of, 543, 575. 
Peruvian Line (Peruvian Steamship and Dock 
Company): 

Direct service to European ports, 663. 

Trade routes and sail ng dates, 197, 459. 
Peruvian Navy, cruiser Lima repaired at Balboa 

shops, 42 7. 
Photographs: 

Of Canal Zone defenses, 734. 

Photographs and blueprints, 103. 
Photo metal checks, superseded by railroad pass 

book, 311. 
Physical examinations: 

Employees', for insurance, 254. 

School children, 37 7. 
Piers, admission to. 127. 

Piers, construction — See Governor's monthly re- 
ports. 
Pile driver: 

Rates for, 440, 465. 

Sale of, 572. 
Pilotage, tariff supplement 134, tariff amendment, 

524. 
Pineapples, canned, 206. 
Plague, general quarantine precautions against, 

769, 774. 
Plugs, fusible, not to be refilled, 466. 
Population of the Canal Zone, 536, 728. 
Port Captain, 192, 489, 670. 
Portuguese Government ship through the Canal, 

376. 
Post offices: 

Acceptance of C. O. D. parcels, 383. 

Count of mail. 129. 
Reopening, 9. 
Poultry, pure bred, for sale, 354. 
Power plant — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Practique, quarantine, 777. 
President Grant, transport, 377. 
Prince Line, 199, 460. 
Prince of Wales, visit, 467. 
Principal commodities — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 



Principal trade routes. 197. 457 — See also Gov- 
ernor's monthly reports. 
Prize fighting and boxing prohibited, 670. 
Property, accounting, 129, 171, 426, 501, 513. 

584, 661. 
Public schools: 

Average daily attendance, 1905 to 1919, 240. 

Holidays, 192. 259. 

Opening of, 61. 

Reopening of. after influenza epidemic. 490. 

Tuition in, 489. 
Punta Mala naval radio station, 485, 501. 



Q 



Quarantine: 

Bodies of persons dying, 773. 

Charges. 423. 

Detention, 772. 

General instructions, 76X. 

Influenza, 3 73. 

Lifted, Atlantic ports of Colombia, 691. 

Night service, 392, 508, 642, 771. 

Plague from Paita, 658. 

Subsistence to shipping. 267. 

Yellow fever and bubonic plague, 655. 
Quarry Heights Reservation, 324. 
Quarters: 

Regulations, 20, 60. 328. 425, 489, 782. 

Occupants — See Governor's monthly reports. 

Silver employees, Las Cascadas, 170, 245. 



R 



Radio service, 322, 373, 484. 501, 703. 762. 
Rafts, handling in Canal waters, 762. 
Rainfall: 

Records, 11, 63, 103. 184, 247, 313, 369, 396, 
450, 516. 597, 662. 668, 719, 783. 

See also Governor's monthly reports. 
Renaico, first Chilean Line ship to New York, 637. 
Range light towers, protecting bases cf. 71. 
Rats, quarantine precautions against. 774, 776. 
Receiving and Forwarding Agency: 

Cargo handled — See Governor's monthly re- 
ports. 

Cargo handled from August, 1914, to August, 
1919, 108. 
Red Cross, 7, 48, 180. 
Refrigeration plants, installed at Pedro Miguel 

Commissary, 53, 93. 
Registered gross tonnage of commercial ships — .See 

Governor's monthly reports. 
Registered net tonnage of commercial ships — .See 

Governor's monthly reports. 
Registry of vessels: 

Admission of foreign-built ships to American 
registry, 422. 

Temporary suspension of regulations gov- 
erning, 48. 

Transiting Canal— .See Governor's monthly 
reports. 
Relief Administration, food drafts, 581. 
Relief days, amendment to timekeeping rules. 

629. 
Renown, British battleship, 467. 
Repair shop, construction of, 270. 



INDEX 



11 



Repairs to vessels: 

Facilities for, at Panama Canal, 1 76, 325, 7 78. 

Vessels at Balboa shops, 655, 711, 755, 778. 

Vessels by outside concerns, 726. 

See also Governor's monthly reports. 
Reports: 

Annual. 88, 643. 

Monthly — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Reservations, military and naval, 14, 324, 357, 

364, 485, 501, 582. 
Resin, excavated from borrow pit near Gold Hill, 5. 
Restaurants: 

Reimbursements for meals. 48. 

Ancon, 377, 727. 
Retirement Act, Civil Service, general provisions 

of, 716. 
Revenue, derived from the operation of the Canal, 

121. 
Roads: 

Ancon Hospital, 182, 253. 

Construction — See Governor's monthly re- 
ports. 

Naming of, 510, 628. 

Ancon Hospital, designated Gorgas Road, 
701. 

Widening of, between Corozal and Mira- 
flores Hill, 259. 
Rolph Mail Steamship Company, 201. 
Rolph Navigation and Coal Company, bark 

Golden Gale, lib. 
Roncador Bank: 

Caribbean Sea, light extinguished. 25. 

Light renewed, 43. 
Roncador Cay, reservation for lighthouse pur- 
poses, 44. 
Roofing paper, sale of, 662. 
Rosina, yacht, blown to sea, 306. 
Roosevelt Memorial, 113, 180, 404. 
Rotterdamsche Lloyd Line, trade route and sail- 
ing dates, 200. 
Routes of principal steamship lines using Canal, 

197, 457. 
Routing of cargo for transshipment. 532. 
Royal Dutch West India Mail (Koninkliikc West 

Indische Maildienst), I9S, 266, 458, 461. 
Royal Mail Steam Packet Company: 

Sailings between Canal and Co ta Rica, 592. 

Trade route and sailing date, 458. 
Royal Netherlands West India Mail (Koninklijke 

Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatasclnppij), 

266, 456, 458. 
Rubber stamps, unserviceable, 72. 
Rules of the road, 488. 
Runners, rules governing activities of, 701. 



Salvage, claims for, 670. 
Salvaging: 

Claims for, 670. 

A'oyo Maru, 687, 697, 726, 755, 761. 

Marne, 311, 355, 427, 44*. 687. 

Olockson, 443. 452, 491. 519. 
Salvaging vessel, U. S. S. Favorite transferred for 

Panama Canal use, 467. 
Sand and gravel, rates, 440. 
Sandbags, sale of empty, 670. 



Sachem, renamed Cuba, 599. 

Safety deposit boxes, new supply, 324. 

Sailing ships through Canal: 

Record of, since 1917, 185. 
See also Governor's monthly reports. 
Schools: 

Apprentices, 259. 

Average daily attendance, 1905 to 1919, 240. 
Class in cooking, 208. 
Colored teachers, 211, 262. 
Employees working at night, 180. 
Examinations, college, 627. 
Holidays, 192, 259. 
Night school at Balboa, 143. 
Opening of, 61. 

Reopening after influenza epidemic, 490. 
Tuition in, 489. 
Scrap: 

Handling of. 192. 
Prices of, 171. 

Rerolled at Balboa shops, 650. 
Scandinavian: 

Steamer service between Seattle and Scan- 
dinavian countries, 697. 
Norwegian Line to west coast, 715. 
Service between Scandinavian ports and Far 

East, 200, 461. 
Visit of Swedish cruiser Flygia, 372. 
Seattle, steamer service through the Canal, 697. 
Secretary of War, visit, 226. 

Seismic disturbances, 462, 639 — See also Gover- 
nor's monthly reports. 
Servants, transportation Army transports, 9. 
Shaw, Savill & Albion Company, 200, 461. 
Shewan Tomes & Company, 199. 
Shipping Board: 

Allots two additional ships for West Coast 

service, 392. 
Sells ex-German vessels to Panama Railroad 

Company, 399. 
Vessels for service between New York and 
West Coast, 377. 
Ships: 

Average length of, passing through Canal. 

373. 
Fires in, 252, 275, 331, 371, 443. 
For West Coast service, 377, 392. 
Greatest gross tonnage through Canal, 371. 
Largest, through the Canal, 160, 371, 467. 
Longest, through the Canal, 160. 
Repairing facilities at Canal, 176, 325, 399. 
Record number through Canal in December. 

276. 
Traveling by Canal and alternate routes, 602. 
Ships' chandlery: 

Stock carried on Isthmus, 65. 

Prices of, 52, 114, 227, 282, 392. 444. 496, 

580, 636, 704, 778. 
Proposed construction, 270. 
Sales — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Shipping Commissioner's sales, 63, 274, 286, 405, 

490, 644, 654. 
Shops, foundry and dry dock work — i ee Gover- 
nor's monthly reports. 
Sierra Cordoba, 315. 

Silver coin, exportation of Panama, 272. 
Silver employees — See Employees. 



12 



INDEX 



Slides at Cucaracha, 444, 451. 

Smallpox, general quarantine precautions against, 

770, 774. 
Societa Nazionale di Navigazione, 252, 458, 563. 
Soil temperature, 521. 

Soldiers and sailors, community house, 497. 
Soldiers, sailors, and marines, reopening of exam- 
inations, 6. 
South American Steamship Company (Chilean 
Line) (Compania Sud- Americana de 
Vapores) : 
Extending service to New York, 604. 
Liner Iluasco dry-docked at Balboa, 505. 
Passage first boat Valparaiso to New York, 
637. 
Spanish Line — See Compania Transatlantica de 

Barcelona. 
Stamps, rubber, unserviceable, 72. 
Stamp tax, on steamship tickets, 438. 
Standard Oil Company, shipment of 8,334 tons 

of lubricating oil, 520. 
Statement of operations — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Steamboat inspection, 30, 129, 165, 192, 488, 528, 

599, 642, 670, 782. 
Steamships: 

Bills against, 400. 

Crews riding on engines and cars, Cristobal 
yards, 117. 
Steamship lines, notices to: 

Canal ports not to be considered bunkering 

ports for fuel only, 620. 
Crew lists for incoming vessels, 131. 
Requesting cooperation in limiting fuel re- 
quirements, 105. 
Steamship lines, principal trade routes: 

Atlantic terminus to West Coast, South 

America, 197, 459. 
Atlantic terminus to West Coast, North 

America, 197, 459. 
Atlantic Coast of United States to East 

Asiatic ports, 199, 459. 
Atlantic Coast of United States to West 

Coast, South America, 197, 457. 
Atlantic Coast of United States to Australia 

and New Zealand, 199, 460. 
Europe to Australia and New Zealand, 199, 

460. 
Europe to Pacific Coast, North America, 199, 

458. 
Europe to Pacific Coast, South America, 199, 

457. 
United States coastwise trade, 200, 461. 
Stenographer, register for, 13. 
Stevedoring, schedule of rates for, 388. 
Stock catalogue, standard, 378. 
Stoomvarts Maatschappe Nederland Line, trade 

route and sailing dates, 200, 460. 
Storage cargoes, 190. 
Storehouses: 

Issuesfrom— See Governor's monthly reports. 
• Prices of various commodities, 52, 114, 227, 
283, 392, 442, 496, 580, 637, 704. 
Construction of, 270. 
Streets, naming, 510, 628. 
Submarines: 

Dry-docked at Balboa, 400. 
Overhauling of six at Balboa shops, 711. 
Used to sink steamer Mam.; 331. 



Sugar machinery for Mormon Colony on Isthmus, 

508. 
Sulphur, cargo of, 207. 
Sun, eclipse, 161. 
Sundry Civil Appropriation: 

1920, 21. 

1921, 692. 

Sunshine and cloudiness in the Canal Zone, 568. 
Supplies: 

Materials and supplies furnished — See Gov- 
ernor's monthly reports. 
Prices of miscellaneous ship's supplies, 52, 
114, 227, 283, 392, 442, 496, 580, 604, 
637. 
Purchased by Army from Panama Canal, 

629. 
Rates, for shipping interests, tariff No. 4, 647. 
Surveying instruments, 642. 
Swedish cruiser Flygia visits Canal, 372. 
Swedish East Asiatic Company, 200, 461. 
Switch keys, employees possessing, 61. 



Tahiti: 

Ships whole cargo coconut oil to New York' 
767. 

Cable rate, 782. 

Small ship transit Canal, 179. 
Tariffs: 

Canal Departmental tariff "A," 731. 

Coal, 188, 695. 

Customs fee, 5, 134. 

Freight — 

Cartagena, 361, 436. 
Central American ports, 301. 
South Pacific ports, 190, 453. 
Tariff No. 4, 647. 

Fuel, 134, 188, 508, 695. 

Handling lines, 134. 

Laundry, 188. 

Medical treatment, 267. 

Pilotage, 134, 524. 

Quarantine, 267, 508. 

Stevedoring, 388. 

Storage charges, P. R. R. S. S. Line, 190. 

Table board, 508. 

Transferring cargo, 388. 
Telegraph: 

Central and South American Company op- 
erating land lines, 438. 

Rates, reduction in Panama Railroad, 4. 

Use of codes, 484. 
Telephones: 

Inquiries at office of Port Captain, 489. 

No surplus telephone instruments, 139. 

Private, 208. 

Revision of directory, 179, 567, 592. 
Temperatures: 

New high record, 582. 

Soil temperatures on Isthmus, 521. 
Thunderstorms on Isthmus, 137. 
Tickets, railroad, 129, 192, 311. 328. 542, 571. 
Tides,— .See Weather probabilities. 
Timekeeping rules: 

Covering travel time, 708. 

Relief days, 629. 
Time table, Panama Railroad, 29, 30, 212, 264, 

290, 398, 518, 736. 



INDEX 



13 



Tolls: 

Charges In connection with double bottom 
spaces, 100, 115. 

Collections, etc. — See Governor's monthly 
reports. 

New record for tolls collections, 179. 

Per ton of cargo steamship Cajacel, 519. 

Refunded, 163. 
Tonnage: 

Average of sh ; p: ^73. 

Ship of great . amnage, 371. 

See also Govt :nor's monthly reports. 
Toro Point lighthouse, 28. 
Tourists' cruises, 55, 638. 
Toyo Kisen Kaisha Line: 

Grounding and salvaging of the Koyo Maru, 
663, 687, 697, 726, 755, 761. 

Sale of Nippon Maru to Chilean Line, 604. 

Trade routes and sailing dates, 199, 201, 460. 
Trade routes: 

Distances to various ports from Canal, 89. 

Principal regular services through the Canal, 
197, 457. 

Travel over principal routes for six months' 
period, 355. 
Training ship for the city of Philadelphia, 376. 
Transatlantica Italiana, 252, 458, 563. 
Transit cargo — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Transports, U. S. Army, 4, 9, 160, 209, 274, 371, 

377, 490, 543, 596, 599, 605. 
Tug Chame, sale of, 72. 
Tug DeLesseps, sale of, 162, 246. 
Tug Dreadnaught transits the Canal, 377. 
Tug Mirajlores, sale of, 330. 
Tug Sonoma transits Canal, 376. 
Typewriter, application for appointment as, 13. 
Typhus fever, general quarantine precautions 

against, 770, 774. 

u 

United Fruit Company, 200, 460, 592, 658. 
United States-Australia Line, 199. 
United States Shipping Board: 

Naming new ships Lake Gatun and Lake 
Mirajlores, 650. 

Five ships allocated to Pacific Mail, 711. 
United States Steel Products Company, 457. 
Uruguay, visit of Uruguayan torpedo boat, 243. 



Vaccination. 775. 
Vessels: 

Acquisition of ships of hostile nations, 285. 

Classified by lengths and drafts, 456. 

Clearing port but not passing through Ca- 
nal — See Governor's monthly reports. 

Dry-docked — See Governor's monthly re- 
ports. 

Enterng port but not transiting Canal — See 
Governor's monthly reports. 

Ex-German slips overhauled at shops, 315. 

Facilities for repair at Panama Canal, 176, 
325. 

Movement of ocean — See each issue. 

Largest, through Canal, 160, 371, 467. 

Quarantine inspections at night, 392, 508, 
642. 



Vessels — Continued : 

Supplied with water — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Transiting Canal free of tolls — See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
Transiting Canal handling passengers or 
carj>o at pon--.' >t: Governor's monthly 
report^. 
Quarantine regulations for vessels and pas- 
sengers, 768. 
Veterans of the Civil War, 13. 
Victory bonds, 28, 143, 179, 242. 
Visits: 

Atlantic Fleet, 371, 388, 617. 
General Pershing, 543, 578. 
Japanese naval training ship, 355, 372. 
New Zealand and Uruguay, 243. 
The Prince of Wales, 467. 
The Secretary of War, 226. 
Swedish cruiser Flygia, 372. 
Visiting hours and location of patients at Ancon 
hospital, 8, 289, 406. 645. 

W 

War Relief, contributions, 48. 

War, taking over vessels of hostila nations in 

time of, 285. 
War revenue stamp tax on steamship tickets, 438. 
Warehouses: 

Bonded, 108. 

Issues from — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Watch inspection, 60. 

Watch officers, aliens permitted to serve on Ameri- 
can vessels, 422. 
Water, sales to ships — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Water front work at Canal shops, 399. 
Water supply — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Waterhouse & Company, Frank, 460. 
Weather: 

Conditions for year 1919, 363. 

Conditions by months, 53, 115, 170, 240, 307, 
394, 448, 509. 594, 659, 717, 779. 

Probabilities, by months, 15, 66, 140, 190, 
307, 351. 423, 497, 566, 626, 690, 727. 

Sunshine and cloudiness in Canal Zone, 568. 

Thunderstorms on the Isthmus, 137. 
See also Rainfall. 

Temperature record, 521, 582. 
Wessels, Duval & Company — See West Coast 

Line. 
West Coast Line (Wessels, Duval & Company), 

19S, 457. 
West coast: 

Development of trade with Cuba, 533. 

Grace Line adds ships to west coast ports, 392. 

Italian Line in west coast trade, 189. 

New Norwegian Line to west coast, 715. 

Service between Central America and New 
Orleans, 590. 

Shipping Board assigns vessels for, 377. 

Coastwise trade, 134, 563, 633. 650, 768. 
West Indians establish branch of American Red 

Cross, 7. 
West India Mail, Royal Dutch, 266. 



14 



INDEX 



West India Oil Company, overhauling of the 

Lady Sybil, 519. 
White Star Line, 460. 
Winds: 

Comparative wind records, 28, 141, 190. 

High winds during January, 1920, 429. 

Storm at Gamboa, 87. 

Velocity — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Witnesses, services of employees as, 231. 
Woods, commercial, Canal Zone and Panama, 

315, 404. 
Working conditions, complaints against, 705. 
Working foice — See Governor's monthly reports. 



X-Ray schedules of charges, 258. 



Yacht: 

Passage of Emerald, 587. 
Ocean-going, through Canal — See Governor's 
monthly reports. 

Yellow fever, 65, 309, 642, 691, 769, 773. 

Y. M. C. A. no longer has jurisdiction over club- 
houses, 364. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, SI. 00 per year; foreign, 81.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 20, 1919. No. 



, Coaling Facilities. 

The following is a report of the coaling facilities and operations at 
the Canal during the quarter ending June 30, 1919 : 

The normal supply of coal on hand, taking the average for three 
months, was 206,622 tons. The amount consumed per month, aver- 
aging the three months, was 47,594 tons. Coal on hand on July 1, 
1919, amounted to 183,964 tons. It was distributed as follows: 

At the Cristobal coaling station, 164,464 tons; in cars at Cristobal, 
594 tons; in barges at Cristobal, 1,044 tons; at the Balboa coaling 
station, 17,655 tons; in barge No. 4 at Balboa, 207 tons. 

The main coaling plant at Cristobal has discharging capacity of 
1,000 tons per hour, reclaiming capacity of 2,000 tons per hour, and 
delivering or reloading capacity of 2,500 tons per hour. 
* Facilities for handling coal at Cristobal, in addition to the coaling 
plant, were: 

(a) Brown hoist. 

(b) One railroad locomotive crane, equipped with clam-shell bucket, 
when necessary. 

(c) Four DeMayo conveyors, on pier 8 and dock 9. 

(d) Four DeMayo conveyors, on barges No. 1 3 and No. 29, two each. 

(e) Four DeMayo conveyors on barge No. 21. 

(Two spare DeMayo conveyors on hand.) 
(}) Two cranes equipped with clam-shell buckets on barges Nos. 
1 and 2, one each (cranes temporarily out of commission.) 

(g) Seven barges, Nos. 1, 2, 13, 15, 19, 21, and 29, with a coal-carry- 
ing capacity of 500 tons each. 

The capacity of the crane and conveyor devices was as follows: 
_ (a) Brown hoist, 50 to 100 tons per hour, depending upon construc- 
tion of ship discharging. 

(b) Locomotive cranes, will average 30 tons per hour. 

(c) DeMayo conveyors, approximately 35 tons per hour each. 

(d) Crane barges No. 1 and No. 2, clam-shell, 60 to 100 tons per 
hour. (Temporarily out of commission.) 

The main coaling plant at Balboa has discharging capacity of 500 
tons per hour; reclaiming capacity of four berm cranes, 500 tons per 
hour; reclaiming capacity of two unloaders, 500 tons per hour; and 
delivering or reloading capacity, 1,000 tons per hour. 

Other facilities for handling coal at Balboa are one locomotive crane, 
barge No. 4 with clam-shell hoist, and such ship's gear as is available. 

The capacity o f the locomotive crane is 30 tons per hour, and that of 
barge No. 4 with clam-shell hoist, 60 to 100 tons per hour. 

The Brown hoist referred to above in connection with the Cristobal 
coal-handling facilities, can be used only for unloading purposes, as 
there is no storage pile there. 

The new DeMayo barge No. 15, similar to DeMayo barge No. 21, 
is awaiting arrival of new conveyors to be placed in commission. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 









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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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United States shipping Board 
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United States Shipping Board 
Rolph Navigation & Coal Co. 
United States Shipping Board 
United States Shipping Board 

C. T. Bowring 

United States Shipping Board 
Pacific Steamship Company. 
United States Shipping Board 
United States Shipping Board 
Pacific Steam Navigation Co. 


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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Tentative Schedule of Sailings of U. S. A. Transport "Kilpatrick." 

(See circular letter "Transportation of Employees and Families on Army Transports," page 9.) 


Leave 


Date 


Arrive 


Date 


Days 
at Sea 


Days 
in Port 




August 18 

August 29 

September 6 . . . . 
September 19. . . 
September 30. . . 
October 8 


Cristobal 


August 24 

September 13 . . . 
September 25 . . . 

October 15 


6 
4 

7 
6 
4 
7 


5 




4 






6 




Cristobal 


5 
4 


San Juan 


New Orleans 


6 



(The usual hour for sailing from Cristobal, C. Z., is 3 p. m.) 



Reduction in Panama Railroad Telegraph Rates. 

Effective September 1, f 919, the following rates will apply for the 
transmission of commercial telegrams over the wires of the Panama 
Railroad Company: 

For the first ten (10) words (cr fraction thereof), 20 cents. 

For each additional word, 1 cent. 

This rate also applies to interline business handled in connection 
with cable and radio companies. 

Any telegraph station of the Panama Railroad will accept messages 
for delivery at any other at the above rates, and the receiving station 
will make delivery promptly to the addressee if he can be located. 
Deliveries will be made by telephone where telephone number is indi- 
cated in address, written confirmation to be mailed or delivered by 
messenger if requested. 

The present rates are a reduction from 25 cents for the first 10 words 
and 2 cents for each additional word. The reduction was made at the 
suggestion of the Government of Panama, to make the rates between 
Panama and Colon conform with the rates between other points con- 
nected by lines of the national telegraphs of Panama. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Fort of Cristobal for Week Ending August 16, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Colon 

Imperial 

Caribbean. . . 
Lake Wilson. 

Chile 

Montserrat. . . 

Panama 

Abangarez. . . 

Palena 

Caribbean . . . 
Santa Marta. 
Lake Hursl . . 



Line or charterer. 



Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

United Fruit Company 

Panama Railroad Commissary — 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Spanish Steamship Co 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

Panama Railroad Commissary — 

United Fruit Company. 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 



Arrived. 



August 11. 
August 11. 
August 12., 
August 13. 
August 13.. 
August 13. 
August 14. 
August 14. 
August 15. 



Departed. 



August 11.. 
August 11'. 
August 10. 



August 13. 
August 14. 



August 14. 



Cargo — 



Discharged Laded 



Tons. 



2,750 
1,881 

686 
2,772 
2,168 
1,278 

350 

2 

1,990 



Tons. 
3,781 
937 
20 



234 
257 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending August 17, 1919. 





Line or charterer 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo- 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 






July 29 

August 10. . . . 
August 10 


August 10. ... 

August 11 

August 11 


Tons. 

3,000 

54 

4 

1,626 

1,770 

245 

17 


Tons. 




Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 




Chile 




















Pacific Mail Steamship Co 








Guatemala 









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 5 

Special Customs Service. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 9, 1919. 

To all steamship lines — In accordance with Panama Canal circular No. 679-8, 
entitled "Charges for Special Customs Service," effective September 1, 1919, no in- 
spection of passengers' baggage will be made for steamers between the hours of 6 
p. m. and 7 a. m. except upon written request of the master or agent to the Chief 
Customs Inspector, upon forms which will be furnished by The Panama Canal. 

For work performed between the hours mentioned above, charge will be made in 
accordance with circular No. 679-8, and masters shall sign in triplicate certificates of 
services rendered, upon which the Collector, The Panama Canal, will make payment 
direct to the inspectors concerned and charge the account of the steamship accordingly. 

In the case of work being started before and not completed by 6 p. m., overtime 
will be charged for work necessary to complete the inspection, and only such inspec- 
tors will be retained to complete the work as are requested by the master or agent on 
the vessel. 

When services are performed for more than one vessel by the same inspectors be- 
tween the hours of 6 p. m. and 11 p. m. and after 11 p. m. and before 7 a. m., or on 
Sundays or holidays, the amount of the charge for each inspector's services shall be 
prorated among the ships served. In such cases the Chief Customs Inspector shall 
indicate on the certificate of service rendered the amount to be charged against each 
ship. 

The Chief Customs Inspector should be advised in advance of the arrival of vessels 
whenever possible, and also informed as to the time the inspectors are to report for 
duty, which should coincide with the time of the arrival of the vessel at the dock. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Resin Excavated from Borrow Pit near Gold Hill. 

In the operation of a borrow pit near Summit, northeast of Gold 
Hill, for use in macadamizing roads, a quantity of fossil resin has been 
unearthed. Lumps as large as a foot in each dimension are found, 
covered with a rather soft, stratified rock. The physiologist of the 
Municipal Division examined several specimens of the resin and found 
it on analysis to be as follows: 

Color, dark brown; fracture, conchoidal; specific gravity, at 77/77° 
F., 1.052; melting point, 37.4° F.; iodine number (Hanus), 58.98; 
saponification number, 4.02; acid number (direct), 2.35; ester number, 
1.67; ash, 5.76 per cent. The material is somewhat similar to copal, 
insoluble in alcohol and ether, but partly soluble in benzine and chloro- 
form. 

A sample has been forwarded to the Bureau of Standards at Wash- 
ington with the request that investigation be made of its possible 
commercial value. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which there are 
likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal post 
offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, persons 
interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa Heights, 
(telephone 286). 

Tabulating mechanician (male); SI, 200 to $1,600 a year; No. 372; form 1800; age, more than 20 
years. T 

Patent investigator (male); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 373; August 26, 1919; form 1312; age within 
reasonable age limits.* 

Expert patent investigator (male); $1,800 to $2,400 a year; No. 373; August 26, 1919; form 1312- 
age, within reasonable age limits.* 

Adding machine mechanic (msle); $1 ,500 to$l, 800a year; No. 380; August 26, 1919; form 1800-age 
over 20 years * ' ' 

Assistant in plant fumigation (male); $1,500 toS2,500a year; No.371; September 3, 1919; form '312- 
age, not 45 years. 

Addressograph expert (male) ; $2,250 a year; No. 378; August 26, 1919; form 1312; age, more than 
20 years.* 

Research chemist (male); $2,200 to $2,500 a year; No. 393; September 2, 1919; form 1312; age 25 
years, but not 45 years.* 



O THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Typist (male and female); $960 to $1,200 a year: No. 300; August 22 and September 26, 1919; form 
304; age, more than 18 years. 

Clerk with knowledge of stenography (male and femsle); $900 to $1,20C a year; No. 30C; August22 
and September 26, 1919; form 304; age, more than 18 years. 

Apprentice plate clearer, apprentice transferrer, apprentice picture engraver, apprentice letter engraver 
(male); $600 a year; No. 149-amended; September 3, October 8, and November 5, 1919; form 304; 
age, 16 years but not 18 years. 

Chief metallurgist (male) ; and assistant chief metallurgist (male) ; $4,500 to $5,000 a year (chief metal- 
lurgist); $3,600 to $4,500 a year (assistant chief metallurgist); September 16. 1919; age, over 30 years 
(for chief metallurgist, not 45 years).* 

Deputy shipping commissioner (male); $900 a year; No. 166-amended; September 3, October 8, and 
November 5, 1919; form 1312; age, over 18 years. 

Economist in charge of rural life studies (male); $3,000 to $4,260 a year; September 16. 1919; form 
2118.* 

Electrical engineer (male); and assistant electrical engineer (male); $2,400 to $3,000 a vear (electrical 
engineer), $1,800 to $2,400 a year (assistant electrical engineer); September 16, 1919; "form 2118; no 
age limit * 

Junior electrical engineer (male); $1,080 to $1,2C0 a year; No. 151-amended; form 1312; age, not 30 
years.* 

Music teacher (female) ; $720 a year; September 17, 1919, form!3J2; age, 25 > ears but not 40 years. 

Engineer ($3,000 or over a year), assistant engineer ($1,800 to $2,880 a year), junior engineer ($1,200 to 
$1,740 a year); engineering draftsman ($1,200 to $3,000 a year) (male); form 1312; age (engineer) 30 
years but no( 60 years; (assistant engineer) more than 2C years; (junior engineer) more tnan 20 years, 
and (engineering draftsman), more than 22 years, t 

Computer — ordnance (male) ; $7.20 to $12 a day ; September 17, 1919; form 1312; age, more than 
21 years. 

Junior highway bridge engineer (male); $1,200 to $1,600 a year; September 17, 1919; form 1312; 
age, 20 years, but not 30 years. 

A'd (male); Lighthouse Service; $1,200 a year; September 16,1919; form 1312; age, 21 years but 
not 30 years.* 

Chief of Division of Fcreign Investigations (male); $2,500 a year; September 9, 1919; form 2118; 
age, 25 years but not 5C years.* 

Associate mechanical engineer (male); $2,000 to $2,800 a year; September 16, 1919; form 2118; age. 
25 years but not 45 years.* 

Investigator ;n commercial dehydration (male); $2,000 to $3,000 a year; September 16, 1919; form 
2118; age, 25 years but not 45 years.* 

Supplemental announcement. No. 167. The United States Civil Service Commission announces that as 
sufficient eligibles have been obtained from the continuous nonassembled open competitive examination 
for office manager and supervising clerk (male and female) no applications for these examinations will be 
received unless filed wit.i the Commission at Washington, D C., prior to the hour ol closing business on 
August 5, 1919. 

Band leader and instructor (male): $720 to $1,000 a ye?r; No. 413; September 16, 1919; form 1312; 
age, over 20 years.* 

Histo-pathoJog'ctechniciar (male); $1,200 to $1,500 a year; No. 407; Septembe. 9, 1919; form 2111; 
age, 21 years but not 45 years.* 

Specification engineer (male); $2,000 to S2, 400 a year; No. 401; September 9, 1919; form 1312; age, 
25 years but not 45 years.* 

*Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, and 
they roust be in thehands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business on that 
date. 

tNonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 



Reopening of Examinations Which Have Been Held, for the Purpose of 
Admitting Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines. 

Soldiers, sailors, and marines will be admitted to any Civil Service 
examination, either assembled or nonassembled, which was pending on 
April 6, 1917, or which was subsequently announced, the eligibility 
resulting from which is still alive, either originally or by extension. 

Sixty days from August 1, 1919, will be allowed soldiers, sailors, and 
marines, in which to be examined for positions for which examinations 
have already been held if they shall have been discharged from the 
military or naval service prior to that date, or 60 days from the date 
of their discharge subsequent to August 1, 1919. 

The examinations will be open to soldiers, sailors, and marines, 
without regard to whether they served at home or abroad. 

The examinations will not be open to soldiers, sailors, and marines 
who served and were discharged prior to April 6, 1917. 

It will not be necessary that a person shall have been discharged 
from the military or naval service in order to be admitted to examina- 
tions. 

Examinations requiring an educational testwill be held semimonthly 
on dates to be determined by the Commission. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 7 

In cases oF first, second, and third-class postmasters, a person will 
not be allowed to compete if the vacancy has been filled. 

Welfare workers who accompanied the military forces; civilians 
attached to the expeditionary forces, including dieticians, nurses, and 
other civilian employees in military hospitals; persons who were on the 
inactive list in military or naval reserve forces; persons who were 
discharged from the draft, not being actually and finally accepted for 
military service; and contract surgeons will not be allowed to file 
application on the same basis as soldiers, sailors, and marines. 

Field clerks, persons who served in the Student Army Training 
Corps, and enlisted armv and navy nurses will be admitted on the 
same basis as soldiers, sailors, and marines. 



West Indian Branch, Canal Zone Chapter, American Red Cross. 

The West Indian Branch, Canal Zone Chapter, American National 
Red Cross has been granted to West Indians resident on the Canal Zone 
and in Panama and Colon. This branch will be conducted by the 
West Indians themselves but under the direction of the Canal Zone 
Chapter both as to finances and activities. Every West Indian who 
joins this branch will be a full-fledged member of the American Red 
Cross and will be required to pay $1 gold each year for membership, 
half of which fee is required to be remitted to headquarters in the 
States and the other half is to be available for expenditure by the 
West Indian Branch for their own people. 

This is designed to provide a permanent and large fund for the 
benefit of West Indians in distress and especially to assist the families 
of West Indians where the father has died or is unable to earn a living. 
This fund should operate practically as an insurance fund for the pro- 
tection of West Indians and their families in distress. 

The Canal authorities have given permission to make pay roll deduc- 
tion for one month only for annual membership. Foremen and time- 
keepers will send in deduction cards with timebooks to Timekeeping 
Bureau, Balboa Heights, not later than August 24. 



New Dentist's Office at Balboa. 

A dentist's office is to be opened at Balboa, presumably on August 
25, in the cottage opposite the cold storage plant and previously used 
by the photographer in connection with photo-metal check work. 
Hours are to be from 8 a. m. until 6 p. m., and rates under the regu- 
lation of The Panama Canal. 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of death. 


Donald Lvte 


52569 
38754 
23248 


Barbados 


Colon .. 


Panama Railroad. . . . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 
Eng. of Maint 


August 9, 1919. 


Clement Pounder 


Colon 


August 9, 1919. 


Tadeo Gonzalez 




July 25, 1919. 



i 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Locations of Patients, and Visiting Hours, at Ancon Hospital. 

The following table shows the distribution of patients in the new 
Ancon Hospital buildings and the visiting hours for the various wards- 
and sections: 



Section and Ward. 



Section "A" — White American, male: 

Ward No. 1, Medical, Eye and Ear 

Ward No. 2, Medical, Eye and Ear 

Ward No. 3, Surgiea 1 

Ward No. 4, Surgical 

Cells (2) 

Section "B": 

White American, iemale 

White foreign, iemale 

Nursery 

Private Rooms (40) 

Cells (2) 

Section "C": 

Ward No. 9, White foreign, male 

Ward No. 10, Colored, eye and ear, convalescent 

medical 

Ward No. 11, Colored Acute surgical 

Ward No. 12, Colored Acute medical 

Ward No. 13, Colored Convalescent surgical. . . . 

Ward No. 14, Colored Convalescent surgical 

Cells (6) 

Rooms (7) , 

Section "D": 

Ward No. f5 

Ward No. 16 

Ward No. 17. Colored children 

Ward No. 18, White children 

Ward No. 19, Colored fema'e medical 

Ward No. 20, Cofored female surgicaf 

Rooms (6) 

Cells (6) 

isolation: 

Floor No. 1 

Floor No. 2 

Floor No. 3 

Floor No. 4 

Total number of beds 



Present 
number 
of beds. 



41 
■11 
■14 
41 
2 



172 

23 
15 

16 
46 



102 

39 

39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
6 
7 



247 

41 
39 
32 
30 
41 
34 



229 

14 

29 
28 
28 



99 
849 



Visiting hours. 



Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 2 to 4.30 p m 
Sundays and holidays, 9.30 to 11 a. m. and 2.30 t«- 
4.30 p. m. 



f Daily except Sunday, 2 to 4.30 p. ai.; 6.30 to 8 p. m. 
{ Sundays and holidays, 10 to 11 a. m.; 2 to 4 30 p. m.;. 
[ 6.30 to 8 p. m. 
No visitors permitted. 

Daily, 9.30 to 11 a. m.; 2 to 4.30 p. m. r 6.30 to 8- 
p. m. 



Wednesdays Sundays, and holidays, 1.3ft to 3 p. ■». 



Wednesdays, Sundays, and holidays, f .30 to 3 p. na 
Daily, 9.30 to 10 a. m.; 2 to 4 p. m. 

Wednesdays, Sundays, and holidays, 1.30 to 3 p. set. 



No visitors permitted. 



Emergency passes are issued only by and in the discretion of the 
section nurse. 



Official Circulars. 

Hand and Push Cars. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights. C Z., August 8, 1919. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

The stock of hand and puafh cars is entirely 
exhausted. It is believed that there is a quantity 
of these cars In charge of the different departments 
and divisions which are not actually in use, the 
return of which to Stock would eliminate the 
necessity at the present time of purchasing ad- 
ditional equipment of this class. 

It is directed, therefore, that heads of depart- 
ments and divisions arrange to have all hand and 
push cars in their possession which are in first- 
class, serviceable condition shipped to the General 
Storekeeper, Balboaj for stock and reissue to 
departments and divisions requiring them. This, 
of course, applies to cars not actually in use and 
for which no need is anticipated within the near 
future. 



It is also directed that all bad-order cars on 
hand be shipped to the General Storekeeper, who 
will have them repaired at Balboa Shops and 
placed in stock for reissue. The General Store- 
keeper should be invoiced by the different depart- 
ments and divisions for the value of the items 
turned in at original prices, such departments and 
divisions being billed by the Mechanical Division 
for cost of repairs in accordance with paragraph 
16 of my circular 656-1. 

Chester Harding, Governor. 



Building Division. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights. C Z., August 16. 1919. 
Circular No. 660-49: 

Effective this date Mr. Thomas C Morris is 
appointed Resident Engineer in charge of the 
Building Division, vice Mr. Hartley Rowe re- 
signed, and will report to the Engineer of Main- 
tenance. 

Chester Harding, Governor. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Transportation of Employees and Families 
on Army Transports. 

The Panama Canal, 

Bureau of Statistics, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 12, 1919. 
To all concerned — The following instructions, 
governing the transportation of employees and 
their families on the U. S. Army transports be- 
tween Cristobal and New Orleans, are published 
for the information of all concerned: 

1. Requests for transportation must be sub- 
mitted to this office in sufficient time to forward 
to the Department Quartermaster, U. S. Army, 
not later than seven (7) days prior to the departure 
of the transport, the cost of transportation to be 
paid to the Department Quartermaster (Trans- 
portation Branch), Panama Canal Department, 
Ancon, Canal Zone, not later than forty-eight 
(48) hours prior to sailing. Upon the receipt of 
such payment, the transportation authority will 
be furnished. 

2. In case of children, the full name and age 
must be stated. Where name of child or servant 
is misleading, sex must be given. 

3. In case of dependent members of an em- 
ployee's family other than wife or children, and 
transportation of servants, strict compliance with 
the following certificates is required. 

"This certifies that 

my is a permanent member of 

my immediate family, habitually resides with me, 
and has no other home." 

"This certifies that 

is a bona fide servant in my family and not em- 
ployed for the trip only. I personally guarantee 
that if the transportation is granted, said servant 
will not become a public charge upon the com- 
munity to which taken, and will be returned to 
the Canal Zone, whenever necessary, without 
expense to the United States." 

The certificates mentioned herein may be ob- 
tained from this office and must be returned prop- 
erly accomplished, in duplicate, before authority 
for the necessary transportation is furnished. 

4. Passengers will make arrangements to de- 
liver their baggage at ships' side. Baggage must 
be claimed by owners at the dock. 

5. First and second class passengers will not 
be permitted aboard transport before two (2) 
hours prior to hour of sailing. 

6. Upon arrival on board, passengers will pre- 
sent themselves immediately at the Quartermas- 
ter's office to obtain their stateroom assignment 
and to surrender their authority for transporta- 
tion (Q. M. C. Form No. 935). 

7. The following is the tentative schedule for 
the U. S. A. T. Kilpalrick: 

(Printed top page 4, this issue.) 

8. If transportation is desired from New Or- 
leans, La., on the transport Kilpalrick, applica- 
tion should be made to The Chief of Office, The 
Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Acting Storekeeper, Cristobal Store. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 12, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective this date, August 12, 
and continuing during absence on leave of Mr. 
L. J. Stapleton, Mr. Walter R. Smith will be .in 
charge of Cristobal store as Acting Storekeeper. 
R. K. Morris, 
Chief Quartermaster. 



Reopening of Post Offices. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 14, 1919. 
Circular No. 73: 

To all postmasters — Effective August 16, the 
following post offices will be reopened: 

Fort Amador, Fort Randolph, Paraiso, Em- 
pire, Coco Solo. 



Business will be transacted by all offices upon 
their former basis as of July 31 and dispatches to 
and from the above-mentioned post offices will 
be made in accordance with instructions in effect 
prior to July 31. Circular No. 62, issued by this 
office July 25, is canceled. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Director of Posts. 



Joint Commission. 



Rule of Dismissal. 

In the matter of the claim of Felix de V . 
Ruanes for properly located on the Gatuncillo 
River, rule of dismissal No. 425, docket No. 
2698, August 4, 1919.— The claim of Felix 
de Y. Ruanes, docket No. 2688, is hereby 
disallowed and dismissed for lack of evidence 
sufficient to justify an award against the 
United States. 

Federico Boyd, Julio J. Fabrega, Burt 
New. George A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



Award. 

In the matter of the claim of the heirs of Agustin 
Arias Feraud for properly known as "El Man gal," 
award No. 200, docket No. 2799, August 5, 1919. 
— At the beginning of the trial of the above 
entitled claim, counsel for the Government and 
counsel for the claimant reached an agreement 
as to the value of the mango and other fruit 
trees, and all other improvements located on 
the property known as "El Mangal," and on 
August 4, 1919, stipulated in writing that an 
award in the sum of §800.00 be made to the 
neirs of Augustin Arias Feraud for these im- 
provements. 

In accordance with this stipulation an 
award is hereby made against the United 
States in the sum of Eight Hundred Dollars, 
U. S. currency, ($800.00) for all right, title 
and interest the neirs of Agustin Arias Feraud 
may possess or may have possessed in and 
to the improvements located within the Canal 
Zone on the property known as "El Mangal." 
described in claim docket No. 2799. 

If payment or tender of payment of this 
award is not made on or before September 
5, 1919, said award shall thereafter bear in- 
terest at the rate of six per centum (6%) 
per annum until paid. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, George A. Con- 
nolly, R. J. Alfaro, Commissioners. 



Certificate of Disagreement. 

In the matter of the claim of Carlos W. Midler, 
as attorney-in-fact , for Constancia de la Espriella 
de Midler, et al., for property known as "Punla 
deChame," certificate of disagreement ride No. 426, 
docket No. 3108, August 5, 1919 — Pursuant to 
the provis'ons of Article XV of the Treaty 
between the United States of America and the 
Republic of Panama, ratined February 26, 1904, 
the Commission hereby desires to bring to 
the notice of the Umpire duly appointed 
under the said Treaty that the Commission 
has been unable to reach an agreement in 
the above entitled matter on the following, 
to wit: 
The Question of Liability and the Question of the 

Sufficiency of the Evidence to Justify an Award 

against the United Stales. 

The Commission herewith certifies this 
disagreement to the Umpire appointed under 
the Treaty as provided for in Article XV 
thereof. 

Done at the National Palace, Panama, 
Republic of Panama, this fifth day of August. 
1919. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New. R. J. Alfaro. 
George A. Connolly. Commissioners. 



Decisions of the Umpire. 

In the matter of the claim of Eduardo Icaza, for 
property located near the town of Arraijan, and 
known as "La Polvareda." Amount claimed, al the 



10 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



rate of $25 per hectare. Decision of the Umpire, 
award No. 201, docket No. 1776, August 11, 1919— 
An award is hereby made against the United 
States of America in favor of Eduardo Icaza in the 
sum of $13,240, United States currency, for all 
right, title, and interest which the said Eduardo 
Icaza may possess or may have possessed in and 
to the property known as "La Polvareda," con- 
sisting of 529 6/10 hectares of land located within 
the Canal Zone near Arraijan, subject of claim 
docket No. 1776, including any and all damages 
sustained by him on account of the expropriation 
of this property by the United States of America. 

This award shall be paid on or before the 
eleventh day of September, 1919, and if payment 
or tender of payment is not made on or before 
that date, said award shall thereafter bear in- 
terest at the rate of six per centum (6%) per 
annum until paid. 

Done in the National Palace, Panama, on the 
eleventh day of August, 1919. 

Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 



In the matter of the claim of Ernesto Arosemena, 
Carlos C. Arosemena, Florencio Arosemena, 
Dolores H. Arosemena, Hercilia D. Arosemena, 
Delia Arosemena de Uribe, for property known as 
"San Jose" located near Panama, consisting of 545 
hectares. Amount claimed, $459,152.80. Decision 
of the Umpire, award No. 204, docket No. 2757, 
August 13, 1919 — An award is hereby made 
against the United States of America in favor of 
Ernesto Arosemena, Carlos C. Arosemena, 
Florencio Arosemena, Dolores H. Arosemena, 
Hercilia D. Arosemena, and Delia Arosemena de 
Uribe in the total sum of $32,700.01, United 
States currency, for all right, title, and interest 
which the above-named claimants may possess 
or may have possessed in and to the property 
known as "San Jose" located near Panama, sub- 
ject of claim docket No. 2757, including the 
improvements located thereon and any and all 
damages sustained by them on account of the 
expropriation of this property by the United 
States of America, this award to be paid in the 
proportions and amounts as follows: 
To Ernesto Arosemena, 13/18 thereof $23,616.66 
To Carlos C. Arosemena, 1/18 thereof 1,816.67 
To Florencio Arosemena, 1/18 thereof 1,816.67 
To Dolores H. Arosemena, 1/18 there- 
of 1,816.67 

To Hercilia D. Arosemena, 1/18 there- 
of 1,816.67 

To Deiia Arosemena de Uribe, 1/18 

thereof 1,816.67 

Total $32,700.01 

This award shall be paid on or before the thir- 
teenth day of September, 1919, and if payment or 
tender of payment is not made on or before that 
date, said award shall thereafter bear interest at 
the rate of six per centum (6%) per annum until 
paid. 

Done in the National Palace, Panama, on the 
thirteenth day of August, 1919. 

Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 



Union" property, including the Improvements 
thereon and any and all damages sustained by 
him on account of the expropriation of this prop- 
erty bv the United States of America. 

This amount ($47,487.50) shall be paid to the 
said Manuel Espinosa B. on or before the 
thirteenth day of September, 1919, and if pay- 
ment or tender of payment is not made on or 
before that date, said award shall thereafter bear 
interest at the rate of six per centum (6%) per 
annum until paid. 

The balance of $4,875, United States currency, 
representing my valuation of the seventy-five 
hectares in dispute, is hereby ordered deposited 
in the District Court of the Canal Zone, Balboa 
Division, until that Court shall have determined 
the conflict existing as to the ownership of this 
portion of the "La Union" tract. 

Done in the National Palace, Panama, on the 
thirteenth day of August, 1919. 

Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 



In the matter of the claim of Manuel Espinosa B. 
for property known as "La Union," located in the 
district of Ancon, Canal Zone, consisting of 441\ 
hectares, of which 75 hectares are in dispute. Total 
amount claimed, $300,000. Decision of the Umpire, 
award No. 203. docket No. 3337, August 13, 1919 — 
An award is hereby made against the United 
States of America in the total sum of $52,362.50, 
United States currency, same being my valuation 
of the property known as "La Union," subiect of 
claim docket No. 3337, consisting of 441 \ hec- 
tares of land located in the district of Ancon, 
Canal Zone, and the improvements which existed 
on the said property when same was expropriated 
by the United States of America. 

Of this amount the sum of $47,487.50, United 
States currency, shall be paid to Manuel Espinosa 
B. for all right, title, and interest which he may 
possess or may have possessed in and to the 
undisputed portion (366J) hectares) of the "La 



Cable Notice. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 14, 1919. 
To agents and operators— The following informa- 
tion has been received from the Central and South 
American Telegraph and Cable Company: 
"British Pacific route to Australia clear." 
"W. U. advise, effective immediately, iate to 
Australia will be seven cents per word more than 
rates quoted in the tariff book." 

W. J. Bissell, 
Acting Master of Transportation. 



July Rainfall lor Three Years. 



Stations. 



Pacific section— 

Balboa 

Balboa Heights 

Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel . 

Rio Grande — 
Central section — 

Culebra 

Camacho 

Empire 

Garaboa 

Juan Mina. . . . 

Alhajueh 

Vigia 

Frijoles 

Trinidad 

Monte Lirio . . 
Atlantic section- 

Gatun 

Brazos Brook. 

Colon 



1918 



9.17 
10.17 
12.23 
14.78 
14.44 

13.59 

12 70 

11.96 

17.75 

11.60 

12 (0 

13.71 

14 71 

11.59 

13.93 

17 80 
117.54 
.13 58 

i 



4.32 
5.13 
5.21 
5.54 

7.18 



1919 



4.94 
4.75 
8.03 
7 30 
7.42 



8.49 7.52 
7.79 8.89 

9.24 7.72 
6.51 | 6 70 

5.25 111.14 



8.79 
11.96 
6.37 
4.78 
7.83 

8.15 
10.82 
10.36 



13.46 
13.92 
10 50 
5.67 
9.37 



9.28 
13.60 



7.93 


23 


7.69 


23 


8.14 


11 


8.74 


12 


7.42 


15 


9.37 


28. 


9.66 


13 


8.89 


15 


10.12 


39 


9.66 


9 


12.49 


21 


12.35 


11 


9.92 


8 


8.94 


12 


11 62 


12 


11.68 


15 


15.02 


14 


15.97 


49 



J 5 
15 
18 
18 

20 

22 

22 
23 
21 
22 
25 
20 
25 
24 
29 

25 

30 

2S 



Cable Address of The Panama Canal. 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on 
the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama'; in the 
United States, "Pancanal, Washington." 



Postal Address of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, 
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," or "Ihe Panama 
Canal, Washington, D. C." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



11 



Misdirected Letters. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 16, 1919. 
The following insufficiently addressed mail 
has been received in the office of the Director 
of Posts, and may be obtained upon request 
of the addressee. Request may be made by 
telephone, calling No. 182, Balboa: 
Aston, Stanley Gaskey, Robert 

Bertsch, Chas. O. Hall. Doyle 

Brown, Carl A. Jenkins, W. W. 

Carter, James Washing- Johnson. Andrew* 



ton* 
Clarke, Charles A. 
Coker, Lee Sims* 
Drake, Grover J. 
Dudleys, Wm. E. 
Ferguson, Allen* 



* Special Delivery. 



Lane, Miss J. S. 
Lecag, Maria 
Morgan, Mrs. Thomas 

Lawrence 
Poupor, Harry 
Tiedemann, Win. P. 
Woodward. W. W. 



Rainfall from July 1 to 31, 1919, Inclusive. 



Stations. 



Pacific section — 

Balboa 

Balboa Heights . 

Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel . 

Rio Grande. 
Central section — 

♦Culebra 

♦Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

♦Juan Mina. . . . 

Alhajuela 

♦ElVigia.' 

♦Frijok'S 

♦Trinidad 

♦Monte Lirio . . 

♦Darien 

Atlantic section — 

Gatun 

♦Brazos Brook . 

Colon 

♦Porto Bello. 



c 






'a 
Q 


Ins. 




1.19 


5 


1.46 


5 


1.49 


5 


1.38 


5 


1.68 


5 


1.59 


24 


2 36 


2 


1.85 


24 


1.06 


10 


1.89 


10 


2.16 


21 


2.92 


20 


2.42 


25 


1.72 


19 


.97 


24 


1.80 


19 


1.83 


30 


1.19 


28 


2.46 


28 


3.90 


a 



Ins. 
4.94 

4 75 
8.03 
7.30 
7.42 

7.52 
8.89 
7.72 
6.70 
11.14 
13.46 
13.92 
10 50 

5 67 
9.37 

8 26 

7.86 

9 28 
13.60 
24.23 



* Standard rain gauge — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gauge at unstarred stations — values, 
midnight to midnight. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Towels, bath, Turkish, 20" x 40", ea $0.33 

Towels, Turkisn, white, hemstitched, 24" 

x 46" ea 90 

Towels. Tundsn, hemstitched, white, 26" 

x 48", ea 1 .00 

Towels, Turkish, hemstitched, white, 24" 

x 50", ea 83 

Bread, Pilot, i-lb., ctn 08 

Mustard, prepared, Gulden's, 8-oz., bot. . .10 

Marmalade, Sunkist, Is, jar 35 

Drawers, women's, muslin and cambric, 

closed, assorted styles, pr $1 .15 

Drawers, women's, muslin and cambric, 

closed, assorted styles, pr 1 .35 

Drawers, women's, muslin and cambric, 

closed, assorted styles, pr 1 .50 

Handkerchiefs, cotton, initial, ladies', ea. . 14 

Handkerchiefs, cotton, plain hemstitched, 

ladies', 12", ea 09 

Handkerchiefs, cotton. embroidered, 

ladies', ea » 28 

Handkerchiefs, linen, initial, ladies', ea. . .32 

Handkerchiefs, cotton, ladies', ea 24 

Handkerchiefs, cotton, plain, men's, 20" 

ea 20 

Handkerchiefs, linen, embroidered, ladies'. 

ea 95 

Laces, cotton, yd 59 

Suiting, alpaca, yd I .80 



Current Prices on Coal, Fuel Oil, and Beel. 

Coal is being supplied to steamships, including 
warships of all nations, in transit through the 
Canal, delivered and trimmed in bankers, at 
$11.50 per ton of 2.240 pounds at either Cristobal 
or Balboa. For ships not in transit through the 
Canal, $11.50 per ton at Cristobal and $13.50 per 
ton at Balboa. For ships taking less than carload 
lots from plants or less than 25 tons from lighters, 
the price is $1 3 per ton at Cristobal, $1 5 at Balboa. 

Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either 
Cristobal or Balboa for $2.00 per barrel of 42 
gallons. 

The following are current prices on fresh beef 
sold from the cold storage plant of the Canal. The 
prices will be increased by 25 per cent in cases of 
sales to United States and foreign naval vessels 
and commercial ships, including yachts. Prices 
quoted are United States currency, per pound. 

Beef hinds, 13 cents; beef fores, 10 cents; 
beef ribs, entire set, 14 cents; short loins, 18 
cents. This beef is from Colombian cattle, 
slaughtered on the Isthmus. 



Statement of Occupation of Quarters, June 30. 



Occupants 


Men. 


Women. 


Children. 


Total. 




3,244 

213 

5,415 


2,274 

38 

2,015 


2,542 

70 

3.732 


8,060 




321 




11,162 








Total 


8.872 


4.327 


6 344 


19 543 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Leather Leggins. 

A long overdue shipment of English make leather leggins in both plain and strap 
styles has just been received and will retail for $5.45 the pair. This shipment was 
detained in England owing to war restrictions and is an exceptionally good value 
at this price. 



Fruit. 

The steamship Advance brought the first shipment of huckleberries this season. 
No watermelons, cantaloupes or plums were received, the commissary purchas- 
ing agent stating that the prices were extremely high and the quality poor. Casaba 
melons were received on the steamship Colon and it is probable that shipments 
of this fruit will be made regularly. 



12 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Books. 

The commissaries have stocked a new dictionary which sells at $1 and is considered 
good value. 

Shoes. 

It is the opinion of the best shoe men in the country that prices this coming autumn 
and winter will be around $15 to $20 per pair. There are some who expect prices to 
go even higher and state that a cheap shoe will be simply shoddy — made to sell and 
not to wear. 

Canned Goods. 

A scarcity of certain canned goods seems to exist in the market at present. The 
commissary purchasing agent has explained that for this reason there will probably 
be some delay in shipments of apricots, asparagus, blackberries, crab meat, plain 
dates in glass, tuna fish, and several other items. 



Textile Trade Conditions. 

Indicative of general conditions in the textile trades is this excerpt from letter 
received from one of the largest firms in the United States: "We have sold the 
product of our mills for the next 6 months, without even having a set of samples to 
show. If we find we can turn out more goods, we will advise you later, but at present 
we do not see our way clear to take any additional orders." 



Wearing Apparel. 

According to a trade publication, clothiers all over the country have been advised 
that pricesthe coming season will be very high. This condition, it is said, will apply to 
woolen and cotton clothing, hats, flannel shirts, work shirts, silk shirts, underwear, 
and hosiery. It has been pointed out that the difficulty starts with the source of 
supply — the mills and the weaving of cloth — and that it is not a case of manipulating 
prices. 

Matches. 

For the past several years commissary patrons have been considerably incon- 
venienced owing to the poor quality of matches which they have been forced to 
purchase. This condition was occasioned by the war restrictions in foreign 
countries. 

We are now glad to announce that these restrictions have been removed and we 
have just received a shipment of the old reliable Canal Zone matches which will be a 
great relief in the present situation. 

Art Prints. 

Many customers will be interested in the announcement that the larger commis- 
saries have opened an art print department in connection with their sections selling 
books, stationery, and sheet music. The initial shipment of pictures consists of 
photogravures, mezzo prints, nursery rhymes, Stanlaws post cards, and colored 
posters, the originals of which appeared in the leading illustrated American weeklies 
and in one monthly magazine of wide circulation in the United States. A variety of 
subjects is offered, and the price is somewhat below that at which such prints ordi- 
narily are sold. 

Books. 

Books received: 

"A.n Adopted Husband," by Sono Amokage; "The Madman," by Kahlil Gibran: "Good Sports," 
by Olive Higgins Prouty; "Firebrand of Bolshevism," by Princess Catherine Radziwill; "The Beloved 
Stranger," by Witter Bynner; "The Life of the Party." by Irvin Cobb; "The Shadow on the Dial," 
by Orton H. Carmichael; "Caesar or Nothing," by Pio Baroia; "The Best Short Stories of 1918," by 
Edward J. O'Brien; "From Father to Son," by Mary S. Watts; "The Cricket," by Marjorie Benton 
Cooke; "The Last Million," by Ian Hay Beith; "The Secret City," by Hugh Walpole; "Tam o' the 

r-t i _ »» 1 TT*J TIT—11 «< Ai:«« CI*. 'U.. i-lm T?;^«. '» K,» T ~\/f Unrt-iam **\S7i*ti fVio PhlMt-on In r .oviric 



by Joseph Conrad. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, SI. 00 per year; foreign, SI. 50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington. D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 27, 1919. No. 2. 

Report ol Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending August 23, 1919. 







Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 










Tons. 


Tons. 


Chile 
























Guatemala 

Calvert 


Pacific S*.sam Navigation Co 

Panama Agencies ■ 


August 17. . . . 
August 18. . . . 
August 18. . . . 


August 22. 
August 19. 


2,379 

42 

422 


522 




























August 18. . . . 


August 20 


400 
2,562 
3,542 

196 

1,631 

2,276 

5 

82 

1,705 

320 


13 






Gen. 0. H. Ernst 


Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 


August 20.... 








August 20.... 


August 21 


520 


Citv of Para 


Pacific Mail Steamship Line 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 


Allianca 










August 21 ... . 


August 22 


1 


Orotina 


Panama Railroad Commissary. 


Peru 










Italian SteanrMi T ine 


August 23 





Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending August 24, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 




Pacific Mail Steamship Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Johnson Line 


August 14 ... . 

August 16 

August 20 

August 22 

August 23. ... 


August 20 
August 17. 

August 23 


Tom. 
(*) 
(*) 

10 
(t) 

13 


Ton*. 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
4 
(X) 


Guatemala 

Peru 

Cauca 

Pedro Christopherson . 



(*) Reported in issue of August 17. 



(t) No cargo discharged. 



(t) No cargo laded. 



Executive Order. 

It is hereby ordered that all veterans of the Civil War in the service of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States who desire to attend the Fifty-third National En- 
campment of the Grand Army of the Republic to be held at Columbus, Ohio, 
September seventh to fourteenth, nineteen hundred and nineteen, shall be granted 
leave of absence with pay, in addition to the annual leave provided for by statute, 
from Septembei seventh to fourteenth, inclusive, that they may have the oppor- 
tunity to attend the Encampment, and that they be granted as many more days 
additional leave with pay in each case as are necessary for the journey to Columbus 
and return to their posts of duty. 

The White House, WOODROW WILSON. 

12 July, 1919. 

[No. 3112] 

Executive Order. 

The Civil Service Commission may enter upon its register for stenographer, 
typewriter, or stenographer and typewriter at Washington, D. C, or elsewhere,' 
the name of a person certified and appointed within three years from any of these 
registers who is found to be assigned principally in point of time cr importance 
to work not requiring proficiency in the technical subjects upon which he was 
examined, after the following procedure: 

(1) The employee shall transn it request for entry of his name on the register 
through the head cf his department or office or his authorized representative, 



14 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

in which he shall state the kind or kinds of work he is performing and the amount 
cf time devoted to each kind. 

(2) The request shall be promptly forwarded to the Commission with comment 
or recommendation. 

(3) If the Commission finds that the principal duties of the person are not 
those requiring proficiency in the technical subjects upon which he was examined, his 
name shall be entered upon the appropriate register for further certification unless 
the department or office corrects the assignment and so reports. 

(4) No disciplinary measure or discrimination shall follow request under this 
order except for false statement therein, of which the Commission shall be the judge. 

(5) A person certified and selected under the terms of this order shall be at 
liberty to accept appointment without objection or hindrance by the department 
or office which failed to assign him to duties in keeping with his examination. 

WOODROW WILSON. 
The White House, 
30 June, 1919. 

[No. 3108.] 



Executive Order. 

1. The area of land hereinafter described as Fort Amador and Fort Grant Reser- 
vations, situated in the Canal Zone, is hereby set apait and assigned to the uses and 
purposes of a Military Reservation and shall be under the control of the Secretary of 
War; but said area shall be subject to the civil jurisdiction of the Canal Zone authori- 
ties in conformity with the Panama Canal Act. 

2. The said area is described as follows: 

FORT AMADOR AND FORT GRANT RESERVATIONS. 

Starting at monument "V" which is a concrete monument whose location is 
latitude 8° 56' plus 3.602.8 feet, longitude 79° 33' plus 1,556.9 feet, shown on a map on 
file in the District Engineer Office, Balboa Heights, C. Z., entitled "Reservations cf 
Fort Amador and Fort Grant, C. Z." File No. GP-2308, dated December 28, 1918; 
thence on a line (azimuth 97° 06') connecting the said monument "V" with the center 
of the most southerly foot of the south radio tower, to the intersection of said line 
with the top cf slope, a distance of 63 feet, more or less, which intersection is marked 
by a monument, marked "Mon. A" on the map; thence a distance cf 534 feet on a 
line making an azimuth of 80° 44' to a pcint just west cf the main road to Fort Ama- 
dor and marked by a peg set into a concrete pad in the gutter, marked "Mon. B" on 
the map; thence a distance of 405.3 feet on a line making an azimuth 70° 0' to the 
intersection with the present boundary line at Balboa Radio Station WZ (Shown on a 
plan dated March 17, 1915, scale 1 to 600, entitled "U. S. Naval Radio Station, Balboa, 
C. Z." submitted by F. H. Cook) marked by a monument called "Mon. C" on the 
map; thence a distance of 635.4 feet, more or less, on a line making an azimuth of 
307° 40' to a point marked by a monument known as "Monument Z"; thence a dis- 
tance of 652.4 feet, more oi less, on a line making an azimuth of 37° 40' to a concrete 
monument, marked "Men. D" on the map, which monument is on the extreme high 
water line on the shore of Balboa Harbor; thence along the extreme high watei line in 
a general southeasterly direction along the west bank of the breakwater, around the 
former islands of Naos, Culebra, Perico, and Flamenco back on the east bank of the 
breakwater and around the east bank of the present Fort Amador pest site, on the 
extreme high water line to a concrete monument marked "Mon. G." on the map; 
thence on a line the azimuth of which is 37° 40' for a distance of 63.8 feet to the con- 
crete monument marked "V" on the map which is the point of beginning. Besides 
the area included in this boundary, the islands of San Jose, Penamarca, Changarmi, 
Tortolita, Tortola, Cocoviceta, Cocovi, and Venado, aie also within the reservation 
of Foit Grant. 
• All azimuths are true and read from south. 

3. All land in this area, north of latitude 8° 56' will be known as Fort Amndcr 
Reservation and all land south including the islands of San Jose, Panamarca, Chan- 
garmi, Tortolita, Tortola, Cocoviceta, Cocovi, and Venado, will be known as Fort 
Grant Reservation. The monuments, marked "Mon. E." and "Mon. F." on the 
map locating this east and west line (Lat. 8° 56") are placed on the extrGme high 
water mark about 730 feet south of gun No. 1, Battery Birney. 

4. Executive Order of May 28, 1918, relating to the transferring of a certain portion 
of land within the Balboa Radio Station Reservation fr om the control of the Secre- 
tary of the Navy to the control of the Secretary cf War is hereby rescinded. 

5. The following described portion of that certain tract of land situated at Balboa, 
Canal Zone, and placed under the control of the Secretary of the Navy by the Execu,- 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 15 

tive Order of May 26, 1914, No. 1948, is hereby transferred from the control of the 
Secretary cf the Navy and placed under the control of the Secretary of War for 
military purposes: 

Starting at monument "V" which is a concrete monument whose location is 
latitude 8° 56' plus 3,602.8 feet, longitude 79° 33' plus 1,556.9 feet, shown on a map 
on file in the District Engineer Office, Balboa Heights, C. Z., entitled "Reservations 
of Fort Amador and Fort Grant, C. Z., File No. GP-2308 dated December 28, 1918; 
thence on a line (azimuth 97° 06') connecting the said monument "V" with the 
center of the most southerly foot of the south radio tcwer, to the intersection of said 
line with the top of slope, a distance of 63 feet, more or less, which intersection is maiked 
by a monument, marked "Mon. A." on the map; thence a distance of 534 feet on 
a line making an azimuth cf 80° 44' to a point just west of the main road to Foit 
Amador and marked by a peg set into a concrete pad in the gutter, marked "Mon. 
B" on the map; thence a distance of 405.3 feet on a line making an azimuth of 70' 0' 
to the intersection with the present boundary line at Balboa Radio Station WZ 
(shown on a plan dated March 17, 1915, scale 1 to 600 entitled "U. S. Naval Radio 
Station, Balboa, C. Z." submitted by F. H. Cooke) maiked by a monument called 
"Mon. C", on the map; thence a distance of 635.4 feet on a line making an azimuth 
of 307° 40' to a point marked by a monument known as "Monument Z" thence a 
distance of 765 feet, mere or less on a line making an azimuth of 217° 40' to Monu- 
ment "V" which is the point of beginning. 

All azimuths are true and read from south. 

6. The transfer of the above described tract of land is made subject to the con- 
tinued right of the Navy Department to lay and maintain therein underground 
antennae receiving wires needed in connection with the maintenance and operation of 
the Naval Radio Station, at Balboa, C. Z. 

7. This portion of land herein transferred is included in the above description of 
Fort Amador. 

8. In addition to the above the Secretary of War shall have control of all lands and 
water for a distance of one hundred yards out to sea from the high water line on all 
shores of Fort Amador and Fort Grant Reservations, terminating at the prolongation 
of boundary lines toward the sea from points marked "Mon. D" and "Mon. G" on 
the map. 

The White House, WOODROW WILSON. 

25 Ih July, 1919. [No. 3130.] 

September Weather Probabilities. 

The following weather conditions may be expected at the Canal 
entrances during the month of September, 1919. Predictions are 
based on the records at Colon and Balboa Heights for the past 12 
and 13 years, respectively: 

Winds — Light southeast and variable winds will prevail over the Atlantic coast, 
with an average hourly velocity cf about 7 miles, although a maximum velocity 
as high as 35 miles an hour may occur during the passage of local rain or thunder 
showers. 

Light northwest or north winds will prevail over the interior and the Pacific 
coast, with an average hourly velocity of about 6 miles. A maximum velocity cf 
30 or 35 miles an hour may be expected during local rain or thunder storms, but 
such storms seldom last for more than a few minutes. 

Rain — The average September rainfall on the Atlantic ccast for a period of 
48 years is 12.67 inches, while the average rainfall at the Pacific entrance for a 
period of 22 years is 7.75 inches. Heavy showers maybe expected on both coasts. 
The average number of days during the month on which the rainfall equals or 
exceeds 1 inch (1.00) has been 4 on the Atlantic coast and 3 on the Pacific side. 

Fogs — Few, if any, fogs are likely to occur on either coast, but night and early 
morning fogs will be numerous over the interior. The average number cf fogs over 
the Gaillard Cut section of the Canal during the month of September is about 25, 
57 per cent of which have been dense. (In a dense fog objects can not be distin- 
guished at a distance of one thousand feet). All fogs that occur may be expected 
to lift oi become dissipated by 8.30 a. m. 

Temperature — The average shade air temperature over both coasts will be approx- 
imately 80° Fahrenheit. The maximum temperature for the month is not likely 
to exceed 94° F. at the Pacific entrance, or the minimum be tower than 68° F., 
while at the Atlantic entrance a temperature higher than 91° F. or lower than 71° F. 
is not likely to cccur. The mean daily range in temperature will be about 13° F. 
on the Pacific coast and 10° F. on the Atlantic. 



16 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Barometric pressure — Except for the well-marked diurnal changes, variations 
in atmospheric pressure on the Isthmus are very slight, and have little value in 
indicating future weather conditions. The mean atmospheric pressure for the 
month will be about 29.84 inches over both coasts. The highest pressure is not 
likely to be above 29.95 inches, or the minimum lower than 29.70 inches. 

Relative humidity — The percentage of moisture in the air varies but slightly 
from month to month during the rainy season. The average humidity for the 
month of September on both coasts will be close to 87 per cent. On the Pacific 
coast the average maximum night-time humidity will be about 95 per cent, while 
the average minimum day-time value will be close to 74 per cent. On the Atlantic 
coast the corresponding values will be about 92 per cent and 79 per cent, respec- 
tively. 

Storms — Local wind, thunder or rain squalls of limited extent may be expected 
quite frequently over the Isthmus during the month of September. No severe 
general storms are likely to occur as the Canal Zone lies without the regions of 
violent and widespread atmospheric disturbance. The West Indian hurricane 
season is from June to November, but the normal paths of these storms during the 
ccming month lie well to the northward of the Isthmus. A rough sea with fresh 
winds may be experienced occasionally outside the breakwater following the passage 
of one of these storms. The average number of days during September on which 
thunderstorms occur is about 18 on both coasts. 

Generally cloudy weather will prevail and smooth to moderate seas may 
expected at the Pacific entrance.' 

Tides — Tidal fluctuations at the Atlantic entrance tc the Canal are too small 
affect navigation, as the maximum tidal range of recotd is only about 2 feet. 
Panama (Balboa) tide predictions are given below: 



be 



Da; 


r ol- 
Mo. 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and He 
and Low 


ght of High 


W. 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 


Water. 


M 


I 


1:38 

2.8 


7:37 
14.0 


2:05 
3.0 


7:58 
13.0 


Th 


II 


4:11 
16.7 


10 :36 
-0.5 


4:32 10:55 
16.6 -0.7 


s 


21 


1:17 
13.8 


7:36 
3.0 


1:42 8:01 
14.0 2.4 


Tu 


2 


2:22 
3.8 


8:13 
13.1 


2:55 
3.9 


8:40 
12.1 


F 


12 


4:52 
17.3 


11:15 
-1.0 


5:15 11:34 
16.9 -0.8 


M 


22 


2:12 
14.6 


8:31 

2.1 


2:34 8:52 
14.7 1.7 


W 


3 


3:13 

4.7 


8:58 
12.3 


3:54 
4.7 


9:37 
11.4 


S 


13 


5:34 
17.5 


11:56 
-1.0 


5:58 
16.8 


Tu 


23 


2:58 
15.2 


9:17 
1.3 


3:19 9:34 
15.2 1.1 


Th 


4 


4:17 10:00 
5.4 11.6 


5:03 10:55 
5.0 11.1 


s 


14 


(kl5 

-0.5 


6:18 12:39 6:43 
17.3 -0.6 16.4 


W 


24 


3:39 
15.7 


9:57 
0.7 


4:00 10:12 
15.5 0.8 


F 


5 


5:31 
5.6 


11:24 
11.5 


6:15 
4.9 




M 


15 


1:00 
0.2 


7:04 
16.7 


1:27 7:30 
0.2 15.6 


Th 


25 


4:17 
16.0 


10:33 
0.4 


4:37 10:48 
15.7 0.7 


S 


6 


0:16 
11.6 


6:42 12:29 
5.1 12.1 


7:19 
4.2 


Tu 


16 


1:50 
1.3 


7:53 
15.7 


2:20 8:24 
1.3 14.6 


F 


26 


4:52 
16.0 


11:08 
0.3 


5:13 11:22 
15.6 0.9 


S 


7 


1:17 
12.5 


7:42 
4.1 


1:37 
13.0 


8:11 
3.1 


W 


17 


2:48 
2.4 


8:49 
14.6 


3:23 9:26 
2.3 13.7 


S 


27 


5:27 
15.8 


11:42 
0.6 


5:47 11:56 
15.2 1.3 


M 


8 


2:05 
13.0 


8:32 
2.9 


2:24 
14.0 


8:56 
1.9 


Th 


18 


3:57 
3.4 


9:58 
13.7 


4:35 10:44 
3.1 13.1 


s 


28 


5:58 
15.4 


12:17 
1.1 


6:20 

14.8 


Tu 


9 


2:48 
14.7 


9:16 
1.6 


3:08 
15.0 


9:37 
0.8 


F 


19 


5:13 
3.9 


11:20 
13.2 


5:50 
3.4 


M 


29 


0:30 
2.0 


6:30 
14.8 


12:53 6:63 
1.8 14. t 


W 


IO 


3:30 
15.8 


9:57 
0.4 


3:51 
15.9 


10:17 
-0.1 


S 


20 


0:07 
13.2 


6:29 
3.7 


12:38 7:02 
13.4 3.1 


Tu 


30 


1:08 
2.9 


7:02 
14.1 


1:32 7:29 
2.7 13.4 



The tides are placed in the order of their occurrence; the times of high and low tides are shown on 
the upper lines. The figures in boldfaced type are hours and elevations between noon and midnight; 
ante meridian figures are given in the ordinary lightfaced type. The time is Cosmopolitan Standard 
for the meridian 75° W. . . 

The elevations of the water are shown on the second line for each day; a comparison of consecutive 
heights will indicate whether it is high or low water. Heights are reckoned from mean low water 
springs which is 8.3 below mean sea level and is the datum of soundings on the Coast and (j-eodetic 
Survey charts for this region. The depth of water may accordingly be estimated by adding the tabu- 
lar heignt of the tide to the soundings, unless a minus (-) sign is before the height, in which case it 
is to be subtracted. The annual inequality or variation in the mean sea level is included in the 
predictions. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which there are 
likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal post 
offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, persons 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 17 

interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa Heights, 
(telephone 286) : 

Superintendent of melting shops (male); $5,000ayear; No. 421; September 23,1919; form 1312; 
age, within reasonable age limits.* 

Superintendent of forge shops (male); $5,000 a year; No. 421; September 23, 1919; form 1312; 
age, within reasonable age limits.* 

Oiler (male); $840 a year; No. 417; September 16, 1919; form 1800; age, over 18 years.* 

Grain supervisor (male); $1800 to $3,240 a year; No. 408; September 30, 1919; form 2118; age, 
25 years but not 50 years.* 

Apprentice map engraver (male); $700 to $800 a year; September 17, 1919; form 304; age, 
16 years but not 18 years.* 

Assistant examiner, Patent Office (male and female); $1,500 a year; No. 400; September 17, 
18 and 19, 1919; November 19, 20 and 21, 1919; form 1312; age, 20 years and over. 

Kelp plant chemist (male); $1,440 to $1,800 a year; No. 418; September 16, 1919; form 1312; 
age, not 45 years.* 

Skilled laborer, qualified in pasteboard box making (female); $720 to $900 a year; September 
23, 1919; form 304; age more than 18 years.* 

Expert radio aid (male); $7.04 to $12 a day; No. 298, amended; September 30, 1919; form 2118; 
age. within reasonable age limits.* 

Investigator in tobacco warehousing (male); $2,200 to $3,000; October 7, 1919; form 2118; age, 
25 years but not 45 years.* 

Clerk-translator (male and female) (qualified in Japanese); $1,000 a year; October 8, 1919; form 
304; age, over 18 years. 

Industrial supervisor (male and female); $2,600 to $3,000 a year; industrial assistant (male and 
female); $2,100 to $2,500 a year; industrial agent (male and female); $1,800 to $2,000 a year; Oc- 
tober 14, 1919; form 2118; age, over 25 years.* 

Junior physicist (male); (qualified in fuel analysis and high temperature measurements); $1,500 
a year; October 7, 1919; fown 1312; age, not 40 years.* 

Plant engineer (male); $3,000 to $3,600 a year; September 30, 1919; form 1312; age, within reason- 
able age limits.* 

*Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 



Local Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations will be held at Balboa Heights, C. Z., on the dates 
set opposite the titles thereof: 

Clerk. September 21, 1919. 

Postal Clerk, September 28, 1919. 

Stenographer and Typist, September 28, 1919. _ ... 

Full information in reeard to the scope and the character of the examinations is contained in pam- 
pnlet form 1424. Information for Applicants for Stenographer and Typewriter Examination, a copy of 
which may be obtained from the Secretary of the Civil Service Board, Administration Building, Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. Applicants for the Clerk examination must take at least one optional subject in ad- 
dition to the regular basis subjects. The optional subjects are: First, typewriting; second, bookkeep- 
ing- third, general business training and experience; fourth, timekeeping training and experience. 
If the third optional is taken, three letters of recommendation from former employers should accompany 
the application. 

Applicants for the examination for Postal Clerk must show that they have had at least one year s 
experience as clerk in the United States or Canal Zone postoffices or as postmaster or as Navy mail 
cierk, and that they are familiar with the receipt, distribution and dispatch of mail matter, the issuance 
of money orders, registration of mail, and the preparation of various reports required of postmasters. 

Application form No. 1312 must be filled out, including tne medicial certificate but excluding the 
county officers' certificate, and should be filed promptly with the Board of Civil Service Examiners at 
Balboa Heignts, C. Z. , . , , , . 

Applicants must have reached their 20th but not their 45th birthday on the date of the examination, 
must be citizens of the United States, physically sound and in good health. 

Applicants must submit to the examiner on the day of tne examination their photographs taken within 
2 years, securely pasted in the place provided in the admission cards sent them after their applications 

Applicants for the Clerk examination in answer to question 1 and on the outside of the form should 
state the optional subject taken in addition to the name of the examination required. 

In answer to question No. 4, applicant must show residence in someSiareor Territory of the United 
States from the time of taking up residence therein to September, 1919, on account of temporary employ- 
ment on the Canal Zone and their retention of legal residence in the United States. The same must be 
shown as to the couvty. ...... 

This examination is scheduled on the dates shown especially to provide for the examination of soldiers, 
sailors marines, field clerks, and enlisted army and navy nurses who were unable to compete after 
April 6, 1917, and who are allowed 60 days from August 1, 1919, to do so, if tney have been discharged 
prior to that date. Those discharged later will be allowed 60 days after discharge to compete; but, 
owing to our distance from the United States and the delay in receiving questions, all such persons 
should compete if possible on the date above mentioned. 

These examinations will also be open to any other applicants desiring to be examined for The Panama 
Canal Service. 

COMMISSARY NOTE. 



Fishing Tackle. 

A shipment of fishing tackle recently received has been distributed among Cris- 
tobal, Gatun, and Balboa Commissaries. Reels, tarpon hooks, treble hecks, cutty 
line, record spoons, swivels, and drag handles are some of the items now offered 
for sale. 



18 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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20 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad; 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against .these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. AW 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of death. 


Hubert Thompson. . . . 
Arnold Green 


23012 
22207 


Jamaica 

. y t. Vincent 


Red Tank 


Operation and Main. 
Dredging Div 


August 13, 1919. 
August 17, 1919. 



Official Circulars. 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., June 17, 1919. 
Circular No. 203: 

Effective June 16, 1919, Mr. T. C. Morris, 
Assistant Engineer, is designated an accountable 
official of The Panama Canal, vice Mr. Hartley 
Rowe, and as such win account for all nonex- 
pendable property in use in the Building Division. 
H. A. A. Smith, 
Approved: Auditor, The Panama Canal. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Cable Notice. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 20, 1919. 
To agents and operators — The following informa- 
tion has been received from the Central and South 
American Telegraph and Cable Company: 

"Manila-Shanghai cable repaired. Direct com- 
munication with China and Siberia is restored." 
W. J. Bissell, 
Acting Master of Transportation. 



Leave of Absence and Time Limit on Quar- 
ters o! Employees Delayed by Strikes. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 23, 1919. 

To all concerned — In accordance with the 
following communication from tne Washington 
Office, dated August 7, 1919, the leaves of ab- 
sence and time limits on quarters will be pro- 
tected in cases of employees concerned: 

"The Panama Railroad Company has been 
able to secure for us some additional berths on 
the United Fruit Company steamers during this 
month, in view of which we will now be able to 
transport all accumulated and surplus passengers 
during this month. We have found it necessary, 
however, to assign a few passengers to the Ad- 
vance sailing August 28. who will arrive on the 
Isthmus a little overdue on their quarters and 
leave. This is absolutely unavoidable, and it is 
assumed, therefore, that you v.'ill protect the 
leaves of absence and family quarters of all Canal 
employees sailing during the month of August. 
We are assuring all passengers accordingly. 
Copies of our various reservation lists as we send 
them to the Panama Railroad Company are of 
course being furnished you, as has been our prac- 
tice for some time, from which can be obtained 
the names of all employees as they are scheduled 
to sail." 

By direction of the Governor: 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Train Service for Labor Day. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 26, 1911. 
Circular No. 1347: 

To all concerned — The Panama Railroad will 
operate regular Sunday schedules on the main 
line and Las Cascadas branch on Labor Day- 
Monday, September 1. 

No change will oe made in the Fort Randolph 
Branch train schedule for that date. 

Local freights will not run on Monday, Sep- 
tember 1. 

Train No. 101, scheduled to leave Cristobal 
11.15 p. m., will be held until midnight, Monday, 
September 1. 

W. J. Bissell, 
Approved: Acting Master of Transportation. 
S. W. Heald 
Superintendent. 



In Charge of Division of Civil Affairs. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 22, 1919. 
To ail concerned — Effective August 27, 1919, 
and during the absence of the Chief, Division 
of Civil Affairs, on leave, }\ r. C. E. Nevius will 
be Acting Chief of the Division of Civil Affairs 
and Acting Administrator of Estates. Mr. S. C. 
Russell will be Acting Director of Posts, and Mr. 
J. A. Mitchell will be Acting Shipping Commis- 
sioner. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Approved: Executive Secretary. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Sale of Four Kelly-Springfield Motor Busses. 

Sealed bids vvill be received in the office of the 
Chief Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, Balboa 
Heights, C. Z., up to 10 a. m., September 26, 
1919, and then opened, for the purchase of four 
Kelly-Springfield motor busses. These busses 
were operated by the Panama Railroad Company, 
carrying passengers between Ancon and Balboa 
up to August 1, when same were retired from 
service. Detailed information and form of pro- 
posal may be had upon application to the office 
of the Chief Quartermaster. The Panama Canal 
reserves the right to reject any or al! bids. 



Sale of Three Buildings on Pier 4, Colon. 

Sealed bids will be rece : ved in the office of the 
Chief Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, Balboa 
Heights, C. Z., up to 10 a. m., September 26, 
1919, and then opened, for the purchase of tnree 
buildings known as the armory, the mess hall, and 
tne bath house, located on pier 4, Colon. Detailed 
information and form of proposal may be had 
upon application to the office of the Chief Quarter- 
master. The Panama Canal reserves the right 
to reject any or all bids. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



21 



Joint Commission. 



Decisions of the Umpire. 

In the matter of the claim of Domingo Diaz A., 
Mrs. Elicia A. vda. de Diaz, Isabel Diaz ae 
Jimenez, for a portion of the property known as 
"Lo de Caceres," located near Pueblo Nuevo. 
Amount claimed: At the rale of $250 per hectare. 
Decision of Umpire, award No. 202, docket No. 
3260, August J I, 1919 — An award is hereby 
made against the United States of America, 
in favor of A'lrs. Elicia A. vda. de Diaz, Domingo 
Diaz A., and Isabel Diaz de Jimenez in the total 
sum of S3, 978, United States currency, plus in- 
terest at the rate of six per centum (6%) per 
annum from December 5, 1912, the date of the 
depopulation order of the Canal Zone, until pay- 
ment or tender of payment of this award is 
made, for all right, title, and interest wnich 
the said Mrs. Elicia A. vda. de Diaz, Domingo 
Diaz A., and Isabel Diaz de Jimenez may possess 
or may have possessed in and to a portion of the 
property known as "Lo de Caceres," consisting 
of 120} hectares located within the Canal 
Zone near Pueblo Nuevo, subject of claim 
docket No. 3260, including any and all damages 
sustained by them on account of the expro- 
priation of this property by the United States 
of America, this award to be paid in the pro- 
portions and amounts as follows: 
To Mrs. Elicia A. vda. de Diaz, one 
half thereof (plus interest as above 

indicated) §1 , 989 . 00 

To Isabel Diaz de Jimenez, one-fourth 
thereof (plus interest as above indi- 
cated) 994.50 

To Domingo Diaz A., one fourth 
thereof (plus interest as above indi- 
cated) 994.50 

Total (plus interest as above in- 
dicated) S3, 978. 00 

Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 

In the matter of the claim of Domingo Dia-, A., 
Mrs. Elicia A. vda. de Diaz Isabel Diaz de Jimenez, 
for a portion of the property known as "Lo de Cacer- 
es," located near Pueblo Nuevo. A mount claimed: At 
the rate of $250 per hectare. Decision of the Umpire, 
award No. 205, docket No. 3260. August 21, 1919— 
Referring to my award No. 202, dated August 
11, 1919, in favor of the above-named claimants, 
in the amount of $3,978, the following explanation 
is made: 

Due to the fact that in connection with a former 
stipulation as to the value of improvements on a 
portion of the tract in question the amount agreed 
upon was divided and $3,000 ordered deposited in 
court; and that it was also stipulated (page 163 
of the record) that $3,000 was the value of the 
improvements on the section of this same tract 
now being connected with both of these amounts 
of $3,000, the undersigned gained the erroneous 
impression that the matter of improvements on 
the 120J hectares had already been settled, and 
for this reason no mention of improvements was 
made in my said award No. 202. 

Having discovered this error, an additional 
award is therefore made against the United States 
of America in the amount of $3,000 United 
States currency, for the value of all improvements 
which existed upon the undisputed 120} hectares 
of the "Lo de Caceres" property at the time of the 
expropriation of same by the United States, this 
award to be paid in the proportions and amounts 
as follows: 
To Airs. Elicia A. vda. de Diaz, one 

half tnereof $1,500.00 

To Isabel Diaz de Jimenez, one fourth 

thereof 750 .00 

To Domingo Diaz A., one fourth 

thereof 750 .00 

Total $3,000.00 

If payment or tender of payment of this award 
s not made on or before the 21st day of Septem- 



ber, 1919, said amount shall thereafter bear 
interest at the rate of six per centum (6%) per 
annum until paid. 

Done in the National Palace, Panama, this 
twenty-first day of August, 1919. 

Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 



Current Prices on Coal, Fuel Oil, and Beel. 

Coal is bein? supplied to steamships, including 
warships of all nations, in transit through the 
Canal, delivered and trimmed in bankers, at 
$11.50 per ton of 2,240 pounds at either Cristobal 
or Balboa. For ships not in transit through the 
Canal, $11.50 per ton at Cristobal and $13.50 per 
ton at Balboa. For ships taking less than carload 
lots from plants or less than 25 tons from lighters, 
the price is $13 per ton at Cristobal, $15 at Balboa. 

Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either 
Cristobal or Balboa for $2.00 per barrel of 42 
gallons. 

The following are current prices on fresh beef 
sold from the cold storage plant of the Canal. The 
prices will be increased by 25 per cent in cases of 
sales to United States and foreign naval vessels 
and commercial ships, including yachts. Prices 
quoted are United States currency, per pound. 

Beef hinds, 13 cents; beef fores, 10 cents; 
beef ribs, entire set, 14 cents; short loins, 18 
cents. This beef is from Colombian cattle, 
slaughtered on the Isthmus. 



Act of Congress. — Sundry Civil Appropria- 
tion, 1920. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 13, 1919. 
Circular No. 600-64: 

The extracts from an Act of Congress quoted 
below are published for the information of all 
concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 

AN ACT Making appropriations for sundry civil 
expenses of the Government for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1920, and for other 
purposes. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United Stales of America in 
Congress assembled. That the following sums are 
appropriated, out of any m.oney in the Treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1920, namely: 

******* 
WAR DEPARTMENT 

* * * * * * * 

quartermaster corps 

Disposition of remains of officers, soldiers, and 
civilian employees: For interment, or of prepara- 
tion and transportation to their homes or to 
such national cemeteries as may be designated 
by proper authority, in the discretion of the 
Secretary of War, of the remains of officers, cadets. 
United States Military Academy, including acting 
assistant surgeons and enlisted Jrnen in active 
service; interment, or of preparation and trans- 
portation to their homes, of the remains of civil 
employees of the Army in the employ of the War 
Department, who die abroad, in Alaska, in the 
Canal Zone, or on Army transports, * * * 
$8,451,000; Provided, That during the continu- 
ances of the present war the above provisions shall 
be applicable in the cases of officers and enlisted 
men on the retired list of the Army who have died 
or may hereafter die while on active duty by 
proper assignment. 

* * * * * * * 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

******* 

saint Elizabeths hospital 
For support, clothing, and treatment in Saint 
Elizabeths Hospital of the insane from the Army, 
Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, inmates of 



22 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Sol- 
diers, persons charged with or convicted of crimes 
against the United States who are insane, all 
persons who have become insane since their 
entry into the military and naval service of the 
United States, civilians in the quartermaster's 
servicQ of the Army, persons transferred from the 
Canal Zone, who have been admitted to the hos- 
pital and who are indigent, * * * 
$1,000,000;. * * * 

******* 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

******* 

COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY 

******* 

Field expenses: For surveys and necessary re- 
surveys of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the 
United States, including the coasts of outlying 
islands under the jurisdiction of the United States: 
Provided, That not more than $45,000 of this 
amount shall be expended on the coasts of said 
outlying islands, and the Atlantic entrance to 
the Panama Canal, $115,000; 

******* 

THE PANAMA CANAL 
For every expenditure requisite for and incident 
to the maintenance and operation, sanitation, 
and civil government of the Panama Canal and 
Canal Zone, including the following: Compensa- 
tion of all officials and employees, including 
$1,000 additional compensation to the Auditor 
for the War Department for extra services in 
auditing accounts for the Panama Canal; foreign 
and domestic newspapers and periodicals; law 
books not exceeding $500, textbooks and books of 
reference; printing and binding, including print- 
ing of annual report; rent and personal services 
in the District of Columbia; purchase or exchange 
of typewriting, adding, and other machines; 
purchase or exchange, maintenance, repair, and 
operation of motor-propelled and horse-drawn 
passenger-carrying vehicles; claims for damages 
to ressels passing through the locks of the Panama 
Canal, as authorized by the Panama Canal Act; 
claims for losses of or damages to property arising 
from the conduct of authorized business opera- 
tions; claims for damages to property arising 
from the maintenance and operation, sanitation, 
and civil government of the Panama Canal; 
acquisition of land and land under water, as 
authorized in the Panama Canal Act; expenses 
incurred in assembling, assorting, storing, repair- 
ing, and selling material, machinery, and equip- 
ment heretofore or hereafter purchased or ac- 
quired for the construction of the Panama Canal 
which are unserviceable or no longer needed, to be 
reimbursed from the proceeds of such sales; 
expenses incident to conducting hearings and 
examining estimates for appropriations on the 
Isthmus; or like character not foreseen or other- 
wise provided for herein; per diem allowance in 
lieu of subsistence when prescribed by the Gover- 
nor of the Panama Canal, to persons engaged in 
field work or traveling on official business, pur- 
suant to section 13 of the Sundry Civil Appropria- 
tion Act approved August 1, 1914; and for such 
other expenses not in the United States as the 
Governor of the Panama Canal may deem neces- 
sary best to promote the maintenance and opera- 
tion, sanitation, and civil government of the 
Panama Canal, all to be expended under the 
direction of the Governor of the Panama Canal 
and accounted for as follows: 

For maintenance and operation of the Panama 
Canal, salary of governor, $10,000; purchase,, 
inspection, delivery, handling, and storing of 
material, supplies, and equipment for issue to all 
departments of the Panama Canal, the Panama 
Railroad, other branches of the United States 
Government, and for authorized sales, payment in 
lump sums of not exceeding the amounts au- 
thorized by the Injury Compensation Act ap- 
proved September 7, 1916, to alien cripples who 
are now a charge upon the Panama Canal by 
reason of injuries sustained while employed in 
the construction of the Panama Canal, $7,547,939, 
together with all moneys arising from the conduct 



of business operations authorized by the Panama 
Canal Act; 

For. sanitation, quarantine, hospitals, and 
medical aid and support of the insane and of 
lepers, and aid and support of indigent persons 
legally within the Canal Zone, including expenses 
of their deportation when practicable, and includ- 
ing additional compensation to any officer of the 
United States Public Health Service detailed with 
the Panama Canal as chief quarantine officer, 
$850,000; 

For civil government of the Panama Canal and 
Canal Zone, district judge at the race of $7,500 
per annum from March 1, 1919, district attorney, 
$5,000, marshal $5,000, and for gratuities and 
necessary clothing for indigent discharged prison- 
ers, $702,000; 

For completing in every detail two sea-going 
coal barges now under construction by contract 
entered into by the United States Shipping Board 
Emergency Fleet Corporation acting, for the 
Panama Canal, to the extent that it was acting 
within the limits of the authority of the Panama 
Canal under the act approved June 12, 1917, 
(Foitiet.j Statutes at Large, page 177), $364,949 
each, or so much thereof as may be necessary, in 
addition to $800,000 each appropriated for two 
sea-going barges in said Act: Provided, That the 
limitation contained in said Act that the total 
cost of each barge shall not exceed $800,000 each 
is hereby removed, $729,898. 

In all, $9,829,837. to continue available until 
expended. 

Except in cases of emergency, or conditions 
arising subsequent to and unforeseen at the time 
of submitting the annual estimates to Congress, 
and except for those employed in connection with 
the construction of permanent quarters, offices, 
and other necessary buildings, dry docks, repair 
shops, yards, docks, wharves, warehouses, 
storehouses, and other necessary facilities and 
appurtenances for the purpose of providing coal 
and other materials, labor, repairs, and supplies, 
and except for the permanent operating organiza- 
tion under which the compensation of the various 
positions is limited by section 4 of the Panama 
Canal Act, there shall not be employed at any 
time during the fiscal year 1920 under any of the 
foregoing appropriations for the Panama Canal 
any greater number of persons than are specified 
in the notes submitted, respectively, in connection 
with the estimates for each of said appropriations 
in the annual Book of Estimates for said year, 
nor shall there be paid to any such person during 
that fiscal year any greater rate of compensation 
than was authorized to be paid to persons occupy- 
ing the same or like positions on July 1, 1918; 
and all employments made or compensation 
increased because of emergencies or conditions so 
arising thall be specifically set forth, with the 
reasons therefor, by the governor in his report for 
the fiscal year 1920. 

In addition to the foregoing sums there is ap- 
propriated, for the fiscal year 1920 for expendi- 
tures and reinvestment under the several heads of 
appropriation aforesaid without being covered in- 
to the Treasury of the United States, all moneys 
received by the Panama Canal from services ren- 
dered or materials and supplies furnished to the 
United States, the Panama Railroad Company, 
the Canal Zone Governmerit, or to their employees 
respectively, or to the Panama Government, from 
hotel and hospital supplies and services; from 
rentals, wharfage, and like service; from labor, 
materials, and supplies, and other sendees fur- 
nished to vessels other than those passing through 
the Canal, and to others unable to obtain the 
same elsewhere; from the sale of scrap and other 
by-products of manufacturing and shop operations; 
from the sale of obsolete and unserviceable 
materials, supplies, and equipment purchased or 
acquired for the operation, maintenance, pro- 
tection, sanitation, and government of the Canal 
and Canal Zone; and any net profits accruing 
from such business to The Panama Canal shall 
annually be covered into the Treasury of the 
United States. 

In addition there is appropriated for the opera- 
tion, maintenance, and extension of waterworks, 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



23 



sewers, and pavements in the cities of Panama 
and Colon, during the fiscal year 1920, the neces- 
sary portions of such sums as shall be paid as 
water rentals or directly by the Government of 
Panama for such expenses. 

Sec. 2. That all sums appropriated by this 
Act for salaries of officers and employees of the 
Government shall be in full for such salaries fof 
the fiscnl year 1920, and all laws or parts of laws 
to the extent tney are in conflict with tne pro- 
visions of t.iis Act are repealed. 

* * $ * 3fE * 4 

Approved, July 19, 1919. 



Act of Congress. — Deficiency Appropriation, 
1919. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 13. 1919. 
Circular No. 600-62: 

The extracts from the Act of Congress quoted 
below are published for the information of all 
concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



AN ACT Making appropriations to supply de- 
ficiencies in appropriations for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1919, and prior fiscal years, 
and for other purposes. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United States of America in 
Congress assembled. That the following sums are 
appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, to supply deficiencies 
in appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1919, and prior fiscal years, and for other pur- 
poses, namely: 

******* 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE 
******* 

foreign intercourse 

******* 

For relief and protection of American seamen 

in foreign countries, and in the Panama Canal 

Zone, and shipwrecked American seamen in the 

Territory of Alaska, in the Hawaiian Islands, 

Porto Rico, and the Philippine Islands, $60,000. 

******* 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

******* 

SAINT ELIZABETHS HOSriTAL 

For support, clothing, and treatment in Saint 
Elizabeths Hospital of the insane from the Army, 
Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, inmates of 
the National Home for Disabled Volunteer 
Soldiers, persons charged with or convicted of 
crimes against the United States who are insane, 
all persons who have become insane since their 



entry into the military and naval service of the 
United States, civilians in the Quartermaster's 
service of the Army, persons, transferred from the 
Canal Zone, who have been admitted to the hos- 
pital and who are indigent, * * * 
8100,000, to be available until expended. 

******* 

Approved, July 11, 1919. 



Act of Congress. — Army Appropriation, 1920. 

The Panama Canal. 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 13, 1919. 
Circular No. 600-63- 

The extracts from the Act of Congress quoted 
below are published for the information of all 
concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



AN ACT Making appropriations for the support 
of the Army for the fiscal year ending June 
thirtieth, nineteen hundred and twenty, and 
for other purposes. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United States of America in 
Congress assembled. That the following sums be, 
and they are hereby, appropriated, out of any 
money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
for the support of the Army for the year ending 
June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and twenty: 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 
medical and hospital department 

For the manufacture and purchase of medical 
and hopsital supplies, including disinfectants for 
military posts, camps, hospitals, hospital ships, 
and transports, for laundry work for enlisted 
men and Army nurses, while patients in a hos- 
pital and supplies required for mosquito destruc- 
tion in and about military posts in the Canal Zone: 
* * * * $4,500,000. 

******* 
hospital care, canal zone garrisons 

For paying the Panama Canal such reasonable 
. charges, exclusive of subsistence, as may be 
approved by the Secretary of War, for caring in 
its hospitals for officers, enlisted men, military 
prisoners, and civilian employees of the Army 
admitted thereto upon the request of proper 
military authority: Provided, That the subsis- 
tence of the said patients, except commissioned 
officers, shall be paid to said hospit • Is out of the 
appropriation for subsistence of the Army at 
the rates provided therein for commutation of 
rations for enlisted patients in general hospitals. 
$50,000. 

******* 

Approved, July 11, 1919. 



Increased Rates at Hotel Aspinwall, Toboga. 

In order to make unnecessary the closing down of the Hotel Aspin- 
wall on account of loss, the rates have been increased slightly. The 
following rates have been established, effective August 1: 

Employees: Dinner, lodging, and breakfast $2 00 

Employees per day . . 2 . 75 

Children under 12 years of age per day . . 1 .25 

Servants of employees per day . . 1.50 

Employees for si ay of 7 days per day . . 2 . 00 

Reduction of 10 per cent on above rates for stay of 30 days. Reduction of 
10 per cent for families of four or more for over 7 days' stay. 

Nonemployees per day . . 3 . 50 

Children of nonemployees (under 12 years of age) per day . . 1 .50 

Servants of nonemployees per day . . 1 . 75 

Meals: 

Breakfast 1 .00 

Luncheon 1 .25 

Dinner , ,,,,,.,,,,,,,,, .• 1 .25 



24 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Porch Shades. 

Porch shades recently received from the United States are meeting with con- 
siderable favor in the line stores. 



Books. 

Books of the Modern Library, a number of titles in which has recently been 
received, are on sale in all commissaries. 



Fruit. 

A small quantity of fruits was received by steamship Allianca. They were of 
very gocd quality and received in first-class condition. 



Baking. 

It is very difficult to obtain "Crisco" in sufficient quantities for cur trade. The 
manufacturers state that they are considerably oversold and do not know when 
they will be in position to fill orders. 



Electric Utensils. 

After long delay a shipment of electric irons, grills, and percolators, much in 
request among commissary customers, has been received and distributed to the 
line stores. 



Books. 



Books received: 



"Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse" (110th Edition), "La Bodega," "Blood and Sand," "Shadow 
of the Cathedral." by Blasco Ibanez; "Prefaces," by Don Marquis; "Second Marriage," by Viola 
Meynell; "In Secret." by Robert W. Chambers; "Small Things," by Margaret Deland; "Conrad in 
Quest of His Youth," by Leonard Merrick; "Tam O' the Scoots," by Edgar Wallace; "Eyes of Asia," 
by Rudyard Kipling; "The Magnificent Ambersons," by Booth Tarkington; Complete Works of 
O. Henry (edition de luxe), S19.30. 



Straw Hats. 

Manufacturers from whom the Commissary Division buys large quantities 
of straw hats, have called attention to conditions now prevailing in that industry. 
They state that since the first cf July, which was the opening of their 1920 sample 
line, they have sold almost as many goods as during the entire season of 1918-19. 
Similar reports have been received from other sources and it is believed that prices 
for straw hats are almost certain to advance in the ne?.r future. 



Extract of Vanilla Process. 

The method used by the Commissary Division in the manufacture of "Pure 
Extract of Vanilla" is worthy of public notice, since there are very few manufac- 
turers of this aiticle who allow their product properly to age in casks, as is done 
here, for it must be borne in mind that aging vastly improves the flavor in the 
culinary product. As a rule, this aging is carried on only from one day to three 
months by manufacturers of this product in the United States, while here on the 
Isthmus it is from six to ten months, obviously producing a superior article. 

The true Mexican vanilla bean, the fruit of the plant of the Vanilla planifolia, 
or flat-leaved vanilla, is the only bean used by this department, this being the 
choicest quality. Such beans as the Bourbon, Seychelles, Mauritius, Tahiti (Vanil- 
lons) are of an inferior grade. It may be of interest to know that Vanillin, an ingredi- 
ent of the bean, imparts most of the odor, while the resins impart the taste and the 
aging forms the aromatic ethers so necessary to a high-grade pioduct. The cheaper 
compound extracts of vanilla are most commonly made with synthetic vanillin 
and ccumarin and no beans. In the process used by the Commissary Division, the 
beans are finely chopped, sugar added and the mixture pounded, transferred to 
a receptacle and alcohol and water added, mixed well, stoppered and occasionally 
agitated for six months, then filtered. The sizes put up by the Industrial Labor- 
atory are: 2-ounce bottles 14 cents, 4-ounce bottles 25 cents, 8-ounce bottles 40 
cents. There are always about 20 casks, or 1,000 gallons, of extract in the making, 
having an approximate value of $5,000. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class raatter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 3, 1919. No. 3. 

Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending August 30, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Line or charterer. 



Arrived. 



Departed. 



Cargo- 



Discharged Laded 



Potosi 

Kilpatrick 

Geo. W. Elder. . . . 

Saramacca 

Balboa 

Acajutla 

Ucayali 

William Green — 

Allianca 

City of Para 

Turrialba 

Middlebury 

Mantaro 

Aysen 

Peru 

Gen. 0. H. Ernst. 
Laura C. Hall. . . . 

Tivives 

Metapan 

Manavi 

Jamaica 

Jupiter 

Caribbean 

Fairhaven 

Colon 



Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United States Government 

Pacific Mail Steamship Line 

United Fruit Company 

Terminal Shipping Agency 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Peruvian Steamship Co. 

Anglo-American Steamship Co , . . 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Pacific Mail Steamship Line 

United Fruit Company. ._ 

Panama Railroad Commissary — 

Peruvian Steamship Co 

United Fruit Company 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 
Anglo-American Steamship Co. . . 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United States Navy 

Panama Railroad Commissary — 
Anglo-American Steamship Co. . . . 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 



August 24 . 
August 24 . 
August 24. 
August 25. 
August 25. 
August 25 . 



August 26 . 



August 27. 
August 27. 
August 27. 
August 27. 



August 25.. 
August 29.. 
August 30.. 
August 25. . 
August 29.. 
August 29.. 
August 26. 
August 29.. 
August 27.. 
August 27 . 
August 28.. 



Tons. 
430 
1,058 
1,816 

j 

575* 
1,020 



9,000 



August 27.. 
August 28.. 
August 28.. 
August 28 . 
August 28 . 
August 29 . 
August 29. 
August 30.. 
August 30. . 



August 28. 
August 28. 
August 29.. 
August 28. 
August 29., 



1,052 

450 

2,534 

2,390 



Tons. 

47 

42 

1,664 

L9 

348 

1,030 

1,935 

(*) 

2,210 

2,189 

40 



August 29. 



62 

2 

1,191 

714 

828 

15 

427 

700 



603 

4,366 

49 

I 

139 



(*) 



*No cargo laded. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending August 30, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 


Mukilteo 


Charles Nelson Company 


August 12 . . . 
August 12. . . 
August 24 . . . 
August 24 . . . 
August 27.... 
August 27.. . 
August 27.... 
August 28. . . 
August 28. . . 
August 29 . . . 
August 29. . . 
August 29 . . . 
August 30. . . 




Tons. 
(*) 




Tons. 
1,434 
1 021 




Oliver J. Olsen 

Pacific Metals Corporation 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company. . 
Fairhaven Steamship Company.. . . 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 


39 


Laura C. Hall 




2 


2 




August 28 


95 
1 








Peru 






August 28 
August 29 


1 






6 




Pacific Metals Corporation 

North Pacific Steamship Co 

Matson Navigation Co 






15 


George W. Elder 


August 29 




63 


Wilhclmina 


August 30 


i 





(*) Reported August 17, 1919. 



Notice to Mariners.— Light Extinguished, Roncador Bank, Caribbean Sea. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 23, 1919. 
Circular No 643-62 : 

Roncador Bank Light U was struck by lightning and installation damaged. 
Light will be repaired and relighted as soon as practicable. 
H. O. Charts 21-1007-1290-945-394-1374. 
H. O. Light List Vol. 1, 1919, No. 1432 D. 
Light List Atlantic and Gulf Coasts, 1919, page 388, No. 2303. 
H. O. Pub. 130-1918, page 202. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



26 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



27 



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28 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Notice to Mariners. — Toro Point Lighthouse, Color of Tower to be Changed. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 23, 1919. 
Circular No. 643-63 : 

On or about October 1, 1919, the color of Toro Point Lighthouse Tower will be 
changed from "WHITE AND RED" to "WHITE." 

Owing to the dark background it is believed that white will show a greater con- 
trast in colors. 

H. O. Charts 945-950-1007-1176-1290-5002. 
H. O. List of Lights Vol. 1, No. 1233. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Victory Liberty Bonds. 

The Liberty Loan Committee is in a position to accept a limited 
number of additional applications for 4f per cent notes of the Victory 
Liberty Loan, to replace cancellations by employees leaving the service. 

Payments may be made in cash, or the amounts may be collected in 
two installments from September and October earnings by payroll 
deduction. 

Application forms may be secured at the Collector's Office, Balboa 
Heights; or a letter addressed to the Collector will be considered 
sufficient authority to enter a subscription. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal postoffices and clubhouses. Incases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights (telephone 286) : 

Foreman of heat treatment of projectiles (male) ; $8 per day; Foreman of small guns (male), $8 per 
day; No. 424; September 23. 1919; form 1371; age, within reasonable age limits.* 

Farm economist (male) ; §2,500 to $3,300 a year; No. 416; September 23, 1919; form 2118; age, 
25 years but not 45 years.* 

Printer's helper (male); $900 a year; No. 423, September 23, 1919; form 304; age, more than 18 
years.* 

Foreman, heat treatment of armor plate (male); $10 to $14.40 a day; Foreman, heat treatment of 
large guns (male); $8 to $12.56 a day; Foreman, 14,000-ton press for armor and large-caliber guns 
(male); $11.84 to $13.28 a day; No. 424; September 23, 1919; form 1371; age, within reasonable age 
limits.* 

Apprentice map engraver (male); $700 to $800 a year; No. 426; September 17, 1919; form 304; 
age, 16 years but not 18 years. 

Woolen expert (male); $3,000 to $3,600 a year; No. 430; September 30, 1919; form 1312; age, 
within reasonable age limits.* 

Industrial research clerk, $1,600 to $1,800 a year. 

Special agent, $1,400 to $1,600 a year (male and female); October 8, 1919; form 1312; age, within 
reasonable age limits. 

*Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business on 
that date. 



Comparative Wind Records — Cape Mala, Sosa Hill, and Balboa Heights, 

July, 1919. 

The total wind movement during July, 1919, was 65 per cent greater on Sosa Hill 
and 22 per cent greater at Cape Mala than at Balboa Heights. The average hourly 
velocities were as follows: Balboa Heights 6.9 miles, Sosa Hill 11.4 miles, and Cape 
Mala 8.4 miles. 

The prevailing wind direction was from the northwest at all stations, although 
southerly winds prevailed at Cape Mala during the daytime. 

Maximum wind velocities recorded during the month were 32 miles an hour from 
the east on the 5th on Sosa Hill, 25 miles trom the south on the 28th at Balboa 
Heights and 58 miles from the northeast on the 27th at Cape Mala. This is the 
highest wind velocity of record at Cape Mala since the station was established about 
2 years ago. 

Note — Elevation of anemometers: Balboa Heights, 97 feet above ground and 231 feet above mean 
sea level; Sosa Hill, 35 feet above ground and 405 feet above mean sea level; and Cape Mala, 110 feet 
above ground and 150 feet above mean sea level. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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In Charge of Marine Division. 

The Panama Canal. 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 27, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective this date, during the 
temporary absence of Capt. L. R. Sargent, U. S. 
Navy, Lieut. -Com. John G. Fels, U. S. N. R. F.. 
will act as Marine Superintendent, in addition to 
his duties as Captain of the Port, Cristobal. 

Lieut.-Com. Chas. Svensson, U. S. N. R. F., 
will act as Chairman of the Board of Local 
Inspectors, with Lieut. M. C. Davis, U. S. Navy, 
and Capt. H. L. Eden, Assistant Captain of the 
Port, Cristobal, as members. 

Lieut. M. C. Davis, U. S. Navy, will act as 
Chairman of the Board of Admeasurement, with 
Mr. Frederick deV. Sill and (during the temporary 
absence of Mr. F. E. Williams) Mr. Elmer Stetler 
as members. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Acting Magistrate at Balboa. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 29, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective this date and during 
the absence of Judge James W. Blackburn, on 
leave, Mr. Joseph J. McGuigan will perform the 
duties of Magistrate for the sub-division of Bal- 
boa. 

Chester Harding. 

Governor. 



Work Performed by Employees for Indi- 
viduals and Companies. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 5, 1919. 
Circular No. 641-1: 

Circular No. 641 is hereby amended as follows: 
1. Employees are prohibited from performing 
private work for individuals or companies, which 
is of such a nature that it should be performed by 
a department or division of The Panama Canal 
or Panama Railroad Company, unless prior ap- 
proval has been obtained from the proper au- 
thority. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor, The Panama Canal. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Acting Chief Clerk. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 27, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective this date and dur- 
ing the absence of Mr. John H. Smith, Jr., on 
leave, Mr. T. C. Kiernan will be Acting Chief 
Clerk. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Approved: Executive Secretary. 

Chester Harding. 
Governor. 



Including Bonus in Estimate. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., August 25, 1919. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

In making estimates for salaries and wages for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1921, the rates of 
pay estimated for shall include as part of the base 
rate from which the rate on the Isthmus is de- 
termined, the S240 annual increase autnorized by 
law for certain positions in the United States 
during the present fiscal year, wnerever such 
increase is applicable; i. e., to the class of positions 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



31 



to wnicn tne $120 annual increase was added 
during the last fiscal year. 

The total amount added to tne estimate on 
account ot the $240 annual increase, will be 
reported by eacii division, in the letter transmit- 
ting the estimate. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Approved: Auditor, The Panama Canal. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Date of Circular No. 660-49. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights. C. Z., August 28, 1919. 
To alt concerned — Please note that the date of 
circular No. 660-49* should be August IS, instead 
ot August 16, 1919, and all copies should be 
changed accordingly. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 

♦Published in The Panama Canal Record 
ol August 20, 1919. 



Sale ol Cement Sweepings. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 28, 1919. 
To all concerned— The Panama Railroad has on 
hand 1,077 sacks of cement ex the steamship 
General 0. H.Ernst, August 20, 1919. 

This cement is known as sweepings, or loose 
cement picked up after the discharge of a steamer. 
There is very little foreign substance to be found 
in it, and for almost any concrete work, it is just 
as good as any cement. 

We will be glad to have you bid on this lot 
of cement before 3 p. m., Wednesday, September 
3, 1919. Please make your bids on the basis of 
keeping the bags, and also returning the bags to 
us. 

A charge of 10 cents per bag will be collected 
when cement is delivered. This charge will be 
refunded when the bags are returned in usable 
condition. 

S. W. Heald. 
Superintendent. 



Joint Commission. 



Decisions of the Umpire. 

In the matter of the claim of Mario Galindo for 
the property known as "Chorrillo del Manglar " 
Amount claimed, $200,000. Decision of the Umpire 
award No. 207, dismissal, rule No. 426, docket 
No. 3002, August 29, 1919.— The claimant origi- 
nally estimated the area of this tract as being 
14 hectares. At the beginning of the hearing, on 
November 12, 1918, the attornev for the claimant 
was willing to reduce the area claimed to about 7 
hectares. The attorney for the Government by 
referring to the established boundaries of the 
adjoining properties, proved that the tract called 
'Chorrillo del Manglar," contained only three 
and a fraction hectares. 

The deraignment of claimant's titles to the 
"Chorrillo del Manglar" property is not clear 
The Government has admitted title to the strip 
of 320 85/100 square meters which the claimant 
bought out of the Los Pocitos tract, which strip 
is included in this claim. 

Therefore, the claim is hereby dismissed as to 
any right, title, or interest asserted by this claim- 
ant in or to the land contained in the portion of 
the property known as the '-Chorrillo del Man- 

glOTi' 

However, in equity, an award is made against 
the United States of America, in favor of Mario 
Gahndo, in the amount of $320.85, United States 
currency, covering the value of the above-men- 
tioned 320 85/100 square meters of land and the 
value of any fences, cultivations, or other improve- 
ments which may have existed on the whole of 
the property claimed, together with the value of 



any damages which the claimant may have sus- 
tained due to the forcible suspension of .his pro- 
posed dairy business through the expropriation 
of the whole property by the United States. 

It payment or tender of payment of this award 
is not made on or before September 29, 1919, said 
amount shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of 
six per centum per annum until paid. 

Done at the National Palace, Panama, this 
twenty-ninth day of August, 1919. 

Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 

In the matter of the claim of Alberto B. deObarrio 
Elisa Arosemena de Diaz, Isabel Diaz de Jimenez 
and Domingo Diaz A., for property known as "Los 
Pocitos , located in the Canal Zone adjoining the 
city of Panama. Area expropriated, 52,600 square 
meters. Amount claimed, $104,202. Decision of 
the Umpire, award No. 206, docket No. 2717 
August 26, 1919— An award is hereby made 
against the United States of America in favor of 
Alberto B. de Obarrio, Elisa Arosemena de Diaz. 
Isabel Diaz de Jiminez, and Domingo Diaz A., 
in the total sum of $32,055.16, United States 
currency, plus compound interest at the rate of 
6 per centum per annum from December 5, 1912, 
tne date of the depopulation order of the Canal 
Zone, until payment or tender of payment of this 
award is made, for all right, title, and interest 
which the said Alberto B. de Obarrio, Eliza 
Arosemena de Diaz, Isabel Diaz de Jiminez, and 
Domingo Diaz A., may possess or may have pos- 
sessed in and to the property known as Los 
Pocitos situated within the Canal Zone, adjoining 
the city of Panama, subject of claim docket No. 
2717, one-half of which is as adaptable for build- 
ing purposes as the adjoining District of Chorrillo, 
Panama City, of which it was a part prior to the 
expropriation, and the other half containing a 
quarry, this award to include the value of the 
quarry and any and all damages sustained by the 
above-named claimants on account of the expro- 
priation of this property by the United States 
of America, and to be paid in the proportions and 
amounts as follows: 
To Alberto B. de Obarrio, i thereof 
(plus compound interest as above 

indicated) $16,027.58 

1 o Eliza Arosemena de Diaz, j thereof 
(plus compound interest as above 

indicated) 8,013.79 

To Isabel Diaz de Jimenez, | thereof 
(plus compound interest as above 

indicated) 4,006.89 

To Domingo Diaz A., J thereof (plus 
compound interest as above indi- 
cated) 4,006.90 

Total (Plus compound interest as 

above indicated.) $32,055.16 

Done in the National Palace, Panama, on the 
28th day of August, 1919. 

Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 

Sale of 95 Carboys of Electrolyte. 

Sealed bids will be received in the office of the 
Chief Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, Balboa 
Heights, C. Z., up to 10 a. m., September 30, 
1919, and then opened, for the purchase of 95 
carboys of electrolyte, 1.4 specific gravity at 680 
F., weighing 13,330 pounds, net, located in Sec- 
tion "K," Electrical Storehouse, Balboa. De- 
tailed information and form of proposal may be 
had upon application to the Chief Quartermaster. 
The Panama Canal reserves the right to reject 
any or all bids. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Bottles, vacuum, all metal, 1-qt.. ea $7 .00 

Brushes, clothes, scrubbing, ea 07 

Earthenware, Guernsey: 

Jars, bean 1-qt., ea 59 

Jars, bean, 2-qt., ea . .03 

Forks, medium, tinned, ea 04 

Knives, medium, tinned, ea .12 



32 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Local Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations will be held at Balboa Heights, C. Z., on the dates 
set opposite the titles thereof: 

Clerk, September 21, 1919. 

Postal Clerk, September 28, 1919. 

Stenographer and Typist, September 28, 1919. 

Full information in regard to the scope and the character of the examinations is contained in pam- 
pnlet form 1424, Information for Applicants for Stenographer and Typewriter Examination, a copy of 
which may be obtained from the Secretary of the Civil Service Board, Administration Building, Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. Applicants for the Clerk examination must take at least one optional subject in ad- 
dition to the regular basis subjects. The optional subjects are: First, typewriting; second, bookkeep- 
ing; third, general business training and experience; fourth, timekeeping training and experience. 
If the third optional is taken, three letters of recommendation from former employers should accompany 
the application. 

Applicants for the examination for Postal Clerk must show that they have had at least one year's 
experience as clerk in the United States or Canal Zone postoffices or as postmaster or as Navy mail 
clerk, and that they are familiar with the receipt, distribution and dispatch of mail matter, the issuance 
of money orders, registration of mail, and the preparation of various reports required of postmasters. 

Application form No. 1312 must be filled out, including the medicial certificate but excluding the 
county officers' certificate, and should be filed promptly with the Board of Civil Service Examiners at 
Balboa Heights, C. Z. 

Applicants must have reached their 20th but not their 45th birthday on the date of the examination, 
must be citizens of the United States, physically sound and in good health. 

Applicants must submit to the examiner on the day of tne examination their photographs taken within 
2 years, securely pasted in the place provided in the admission cards sent them after their applications 
are filed. 

Applicants for the Clerk examination in answer to question 1 and on the outside of the form should 
state the optional subject taken in addition to the name of the examination required. 

In answer to question No. 4, applicant must show residence in some Stale or Territory of the United 
States from the time of taking up residence therein to September, 1919, on account of temporary employ- 
ment on the Canal Zone and their retention of legal residence in the United States. The same must be 
shown as to the county. 

This examination is scheduled on the dates shown especially to provide for the exam ination ot soldiers, 
sailors, marines, field clerks, and enlisted army and navy nurses who were unable to compete after 
April 6, 1917, and who are allowed 60 days from August 1, 1919, to do so, if tney have been discharged 
prior to that date. Those discharged later will be allowed 60 days after discharge to compete; but, 
owing to our distance from the United States and the delay in receiving questions, all such persons 
should compete if possible on the date above mentioned. 

These examinations will also be open to any other applicants desiring to be examined for The Panama 
Canal Service. 



Route Service Jitney— Cristobal-Mt. Hope. 

The following is the schedule of the official jitney service between 

the Terminal building at Cristobal and Mount Hope. Cars stop at 
the office of the Commissary Division each way: 

Leave Terminal Building. Leave Mount Hope. 

A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. 

8.00 12.30 8.15 12.45 

8.30 1.00 8.45 1.15 

9.00 1.30 9.15 1.45 

9.30 2.00 9.45 2.15 

10.00 2.30 10.15 2.45 

10.30 3.00 10.45 3.15 

3.30 3.45 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Fruits. 

The first shipment of grapes of the season was received on the steamer Colon, 
September 1. Other seasonable fruits and vegetables were received and found 
ready sale. 

Shoe Sale. 

A shoe sale covering a large number of attractive models and styles at consider- 
ably reduced prices is announced to be held at Balboa and Cristobal Commissaries 
only, beginning Monday, September 8, 1919. 

Rooks. 

A very attractive 24-page booklet, descriptive of The Panama Canal, and contain- 
ing many views of recent date as well as some taken prior to the completion of the 
Canal, has recently been stocked by the Commissary Division. A map, table of 
distances to various ports, and other interesting information are also included. These 
booklets sell at 20 cents each. 

Books received: 

"Arrow of Gold" (de luxe edition), by Joseph Conrad; "Chinese Poems," by Arthur Waley; "Lad, a 
Dog," by Albert Payson Terhune; "Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse" (116th Edition), by Blasco 
Ibanez. 





THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 10, 1919. No. 4. 

CANAL WORK IN JULY. 

The following is the report of the Governor to the Secretary of 
War of Canal operations during the month of July, 1919: 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 2, 1919. 
The Honorable, the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of The Panama Canal for 
the month of July, 1919: 

CANAL TRAFFIC. 

The number of ocean-going commercial vessels passing through the Canal for the 
month was 158, exclusive of 24 United States Navy destroyers, 22 United States 
battleships, 7 United States cruisers, 4 United States supply ships, 5 United States 
colliers, 6 United States scout patrols, 2 United States Navy subchasers, 1 United 
States Coast and Geodetic Survey ship, and 3 United States Navy Coast Guard 
vessels. The total number of ocean-going vessels was 232, the greatest number 
which the Canal has handled in any month to date. The large number of Naval 
vessels was due to the passage of part of the Pacific Fleet to the Pacific, and the 
transit from Atlantic to Pacific and return of the six battleships of the Naval 
Academy Practice Squadron. 

Classifications of the traffic are shown in the following tabulations. The net ton- 
nage of the 158 commercial ships aggregated 513,618 tons, Panama Canal meas- 
urement. Their registered gross tonnage was 617,778 tons, and their registered net 
tonnage 430,519 tons. The cargo carried by them totaled 568,172 tons of 2,240 
pounds, of which 7 ; 527 tons were carried as deck load. Ships of 11 different national- 
ities were included in the month's traffic. The total net tonnage of commercial ships 
was 6,388 less than that of commercial ships passing through the Canal in June, when 
161 ships of 520,006 tons made the transit. The cargo carried was 18,715 tons less 
than that handled through the Canal in June. 

The United States coastwise trade was made up of 30 vessels, aggregating 103,542 
net tons, Panama Canal measurement, and carrying 131,953 tonsof cargo. Fromthe 
Atlantic to the Pacific, 4 ships with a total net tonnage of 14,426 net tons, Panama 
Canal measurement, carried 21,679 tons of cargo. From the Pacific to the Atlantic 
26 vessels of 89,1 16 net tons carried 1 10,274 tons of cargo. 

The United States Shipping Board operated 2 of the westbound ships in the coast- 
wise trade, with a net tonnage of 9,994, Panama Canal measurement, carrying 14,687 
tons of cargo, and operated 24 out of the 26 vessels eastbound. The net tonnage of 
the 24 ships aggregated 75,550 and their cargo amounted to 1 10,274 tons. 

In the foreign trade the Shipping Board sent 6 vessels of 10,338 net tons, Panama 
Canal measurement, through from Pacific to the Atlantic, carrying 14,392 tons of 
cargo. No Shipping Board ships passed from Atlantic to Pacific in the foreign trade. 

Among the principal commodities included in the traffic from the Pacific to the 
Atlantic during the month were: Flour, 8 whole cargoes, aggregating 61,623 tons; 
lumber and ties, 18 whole cargoes, 47,953 tons; nitrates, 5 whole cargoes, 18,537 
tons; 3 whole cargoes of sugar amounting to 18,672 tons; barley, 3 whole cargoes, 
9,603 tons; 2 whole cargoes of wheat, 12,485 tons; and 27 cargoes of general, amount- 
ing to 90,135 tons. Three ships went in ballast from the west coast to Beaumont; 
their aggregate net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, was 18,283 tons. The 
bulk shipments from the Atlantic to the Pacific were: Fuel oil, 25,148 tons, all for 
the west coast of South America; kerosene, 14,781 tons, of which 8,862 tons were 
from New Orleans to Shanghai, and 5,919 tons from Port Arthur to Shanghai; 
petroleum, 12,880 tons, of which 8,251 tons were from New Orleans to Honolulu, 
4,629 tons, from New York to San Francisco; coal, 12,915 tons, of which 5,287 tons 
were from Norfolk, bound for the west coast of South America, 2,947 tons from Balti- 
more to Guayaquil, and 4,681 tons from London to Auckland; coke, 7,004 tons, all 
from Baltimore to Callao, one cargo of paraffin oil, 9,138 tons, from New Orleans to 
Shanghai; and 4,300 tons of crude naphtha from Tampico to San Francisco. 



34 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Commercial vessels passing through the Canal on their way to the west coast of 
South and Central America during July were, by nationalities, as follows: 



No. 


Nationality. 


Registered 

gross 
tonnage. 


Registered 

net 
tonnage. 


Panama 

Canal 

net 

tonnage. 


Cargo. 


15 




40,273 

6,367 

69 

7,822 

44,183 


24,981 

3,889 

53 

3,941 

29,303 


30,318 

5,570 

53 

5,005 

31,846 


Tom. 
25,802 


2 




3,367 








2 




3,399 


15 




47,377 








35 


98,714 


62,167 


72,792 


79,945 







Of the 35 vessels, 17 with 14,315 tons of cargo originated at the Atlantic terminus 
of the Canal; 13 with 43,224 tons, came from United States ports; 2 with 13,198 
tons of oil, from Tampico; 2 with 9,208 tons of general cargo, from Liverpool, and 
1 with no cargo, from Gibraltar. 

SERVICES TO CANAL SHIPPING. 

Repairs were made on 125 vessels during the month, 61 at Cristobal and 64 at 
Balboa. Sixteen vessels were dry-docked at Cristobal and 15 at Balboa. Sales of 
fuel oil to ships from the stock of The Panama Canal were 672. 22 barrels to 2 vessels at 
Cristobal. Coal sales were 27,859 tons to 77 vessels at Cristobal, and 4,775 tons to 20 
vessels at Balboa, a total of 97 vessels, receiving 32,625 tons. Water sold included 
6,738,490 gallons to 156 vessels at Cristobal and 2,310,750 gallons to 115 vessels at 
Balboa, a total of 9,049,240 gallons to 271 vessels. Sales of commissary supplies to 
commercial ships of lines other than that of the Panama Railroad aggregated 
$65,071.21, of which $40,683.25 worth was supplied at Cristobal and $24,387.96 at 
Balboa. Laundry service for all ships amounted to $3,023.21. Tug service per- 
formed for vessels using the Canal and the terminal ports was charged at $22,940.45, 
of which $13,470.20 was collected through the office of the Captain of the Port at 
Cristobal, and $9,470.25 at Balboa. 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS. 
Details of the business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals of the Canal 
are shown in the following tabulation: 



Item. 



Commercial ships making transit of Canal 

Net tonnage of commercial ships, P. C. measurement 

United States equivalent net tonnage of commercial ships 

Registered gross tonnage of commercial ships 

Registered net tonnage of commercial ships 

Cargo through Canal in commercial ships, tons of 2,240 pounds 

Deck load cargo, included in above 

Nationality of commercial ships through Canal: 

British 

Chilean 

Danish 

French 

Japanese 

Norwegian 

Peruvian 

Panamanian 

Swedish 

Spanish 

United States 



Total 



Panama Canal net tonnage of commercial ships through the Canal: 

British 

Chilean 

Danish 

French 

Japanese 

Norwegian 

Peruvian 

Panamanian 

Swedish 



United States. 



Total. 



United States equivalent net tonnage of commercial ships, through the 
Canal: 

British 

Chilean .«, 



Cristobal. 



67 
223.590 
194.185 
291.408 
186.433 
235,874 
900 

34 

2 



131.859 
5,570 



IS, 185 



5.0J5 

53 

3,900 



59,018 



223,590 



115,387 
3.540 



Balboa. 



91 
290 028 
320,873 
380 370 
244 086 
332 298 
6,627 

26 
2 
1 
2 
4 
1 
3 



91 

96 899 
5,570 
3 479 
3 934 

18.477 
5 042 
S,220 



2 467 
145,940 



83,039 
3.540 



Total. 



158 
513.618 
515 058 
671 778 
430,519 
568.172 
7,527 

60 
4 
1 



158 

228.758 
11,140 
3 479 
3,934 
36,662 
5 042 
13,225 
53 

s/m 

2,467 
204,958 



513.618 



198,126 
7.080 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



35 



Item. 


Cristobal. 


Balboa. 


Total. 


United States equivalent net tonnage of commercial ships, through the 
Canal — continued : 




2,823 
'3,840 
16 095 
4.438 
5,803 


2,823 






3.840 




15,926 


32 021 




4,438 




3,351 

53 

2,380 


9,154 




53 




2.224 
199,071 


2,380 




2,224 




53,548 


252,619 






Total 


194,185 

170,339 
6.367 


320.873 

127,293 
6.3i.7 
4.395 
4,729 
24,116 
6.987 
12,677 


515,058 


Registered gross tonnage of commercial ships through the Canal: 


297,632 




12,734 




4.395 






4,729 




23,652 


47,768 




6,987 




7,922 

69 

3,805 


20,599 




69 






3 805 




3,370 
19C.436 


3.370 




79,254 


269,690 






Total 


291,408 

108,049 
3,889 


380,370 

81,890 
3,889 
2,795 
3,834 

14,855 
4.422 
7,014 


671,778 


Registered net tonnage of commercial ships, through the Canal: 

British 


189,939 




7,778 




2,795 






3.834 




15,183 


30. 038 




4.422 




3,941 

53 

2,833 


10,955 




53 




2,174 
123,213 


2,833 




2,174 




52,485 


175,698 






Total 


1S6.433 

111,988 
3,367 


244,086 

95,016 
3,135 
6,753 
3,901 

30,176 
8,952 


430 519 


Cargo carried by ships of various nationalities: 


207,004 




6,502 




6,753 






3,901 




29,560 
3,399 
2,200 


59,736 




12,351 




2 200 




4,100 
180,265 


4,100 


United States 


85,360 


265,625 






Total 


235,874 

16 
7 

24 
4 
4 
3 
1 
2 
1 


332,298 
6 


568,172 


Vessels passing through the Canal free of tolls: 


22 




7 






24 




1 


5 


(T 8. Navy supply -hips 


4 




3 
1 
1 


6 




2 




3 




1 








Total 


62 

2 

5 

125 

127 

27,989 

4 

15,060 


1: 
3 
21 
103 
106 
4,000 


74 




5 




26 




228 




233 




31.989 




4 


Net tonnage of above 




15 960 


Commercial ships through Canal in ballast 


7 

29,426 

7 

29,426 

5 

4,859 

1 

1,171 

$279,807 70 

21.175 S2 


7 






29.426 




4 

15,060 


11 




44 486 




5 






4,859 






1 


Net tonnage of sailing ships 


1237,501.54 


1,171 

$517 309 24 




21,175 92 








Total tolls levied 


|$237,501.54 


$300,983 62 


$538,485.16 



36 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Item. 



Cristobal. 



Balbsa. 



Total. 



Total ships entering port 

Total ships clearing from port. 



Total ships handled, . '. 

Net registered tonnage of vessels entering port. 
Net registered tonnage of vessels clearing port.. 



Total, for vessels entering and clearing 

Registered gross tonnage of vessels entering 

Registered gross tonnage of vessels clearing 

Total registered gross tonnage of vessels entering and clearing '. 

Vessels entering port, bat not passing through Canal 

Ne; tonnage of above 

Gross tonnage of above 

Vessels clearing port, b-t not passing through Canal 

Net tonnage ot above 

Gross tonnage of above 

Vessels passing through Canal, and handling passengers or cargo at 
port, entered 

Net tonnage of above 

Gross tonnage of above 

Vessels passing through Canal, and handling passengers or cargo at port, 
cleared 

Net tonnage of above 

Gross tonnage oi above 

Transit cargo arriving tons. 

Transit cargo cleared «, tone. 

LocaV cargo arriving tons. 

Local cargo shipped tons. . 

Total local cargo handled tons. 

Total local and transit cargo tons. 

Cargo received by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R.. . . tons . 
Cargo dispat. bed by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P.R.R... tons . 
Cargo rehandled by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R tons . 

Total cargo handled by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of 

P. R R tons. . 

Cargo stevedored, included in above, tons 

Commercial vessels other than P. R. R. supplied with bunker coal . tons . 

Panama Railroad vessels supplied with bunker coal tons 

Coal received during July toru. 

Coal supplied Panama Railroad Steamship Line tons . 

Coal supplied Panama Kailroad departments tons. . 

Coal supplied individuals and companies tons. . 

Coal supplied other steamship lines tons. . 

Coal supplied Army, includ'ng vessels tons. . 

Coal supplied Navy, including vessels tons 

Coa-1 supplied The Panama Canal tons. 

Coal on hand, Agust 1 tons. 

Vessels supplied with water 

Water sold to ships gals.'.' 

Vessels dry-docked 

Commerial vessels furnished commissary supplies 

Panama Railroad vessels furnished cnmmissarv supplies 

Other U. S. Government vessels furnished commissary supplies ........ 

Total vessels furnished commissary supplies 

Comnisssry ^ales to commercial vessels: 

lee 

Wholesale groceries 

Whole : ale cold storage 

Laundrv 

Miscellaneous 



Total 

Commissary sales to Panama Railroad vessels: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 



Total , 

Cemmissary sales to other Government vessels: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaseous 



Total 

T«tal commissary sales to vessels . 



244 

250 



494 
1,043,090 
1,056,316 



2,099.406 
1,384,244 
1.403 887 



2.; 



,131 
39 
87,308 
144.702 
43 
101,377 
166,716 

32 
41,267 
67,475 

34 

42,426 
70,017 
624,649 
633,284 



42,517 
3,286 



45,803 



1.303,736 
39.118 

46,087 
"666 



227 
224 



451 
876,658 
S27.097 



1,703,755 
1,132,309 
1,081,023 



2,213,332 
4 
4,844 
8,287 
6 
9,611 
14,852 

36 
48,857 
83,636 

36 

46,124 

79.863 

612,237 

612,279 



4.111 
1.470 



5,581 



85,871 

30,545 

76 

1 

12,035 

202 

1,085 

457 

27.648 

432 

2,624 

2,122 

132,870 

156 

,738,490 

16 

115 

9 

44 



1.230,097 
7,646 
1,510 
5,323 



14,479 
134 
20 



168 

$841 01 

11,056.78 

25,541.85 

1,425.44 

1,818.17 



f40.6S3.25 

$102.00 

2,092 23 

6,629 SO 

436 63 

530.37 



4,775 

21 

3,128 

910 

6,463 

115 

2,310,750 

15 

70 



22 



92 

$381.56 

4,507.07 

17,837.12 

1,15 

1,661.06 



471 

474 



945 
1,919.748 
1,883,413 



3,803,161 
2,516,553 
2,484.910 



5,001,463 
43 
92.152 
152.989 
49 
110.938 
181 ,568 

68 
90,124 
151,111 

70 

88,550 

149,880 

1,230,886 

1,245,563 



46.628 
4,758 



51,384 



2,533,833 

46 764 

47,597 

5,989 



100,350 

30,679 

96 

1 

12 .035 

202 

1.085 

457 

32,423 

453 

5,752 

3,032 

139.333 

271 

,049,240 

31 

185 

9 

66 



260 

$1,222.57 

15 563 85 

43,378 97 

1,426 59 

3,479 23 



$24,387.96 



$9,791.03 

$370 00 

5.639.95 

53,383 37 

327.07 

1,464.02 



$61,184 41 



1111,658.69 



$505 24 

3,502 50 

29,412 27 

424.59 

1,037.41 



$34 882 01 



$59,269.97 



$65,071.21 

$102.00 

2 092 23 

6.629 80 

436 63 

530 37 



$9,791.03 

$875 24 

9.142 45 

82,795 64 

751 66 

2,501.43 



$96 066.42 



$170,928.61 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



37 



Item. 




Cristobal. 


Balboa. 


Total. 






205.02 

465.29 

5,434.41 

239 50 




205 00 




467.20 


23,477.78 
349.38 


28,912.19 

588.88 


Passengers arriving, including transit passengers: 


6,346.13 
32.560 52 
277,387.08 


23,827.16 

118,(01.83 

37,742.86 

1,516.21 

1,546 
2,997 


30,173.29 

151,262 35 

315,129.94 

1,516.21 




2,513 
7,120 


4,059 




10 117 








Total 


9,633 

2,889 
6,545 


4,543 

1,534 
3,000 


14,176 


Total passengers departing including transit passengers: 


4.423 




9,545 








Total... « 


9 434 


4.534 


13,968 










19,067 

1.091 
1,188 


9,077 

187 
67 


28,144 


Passengers disembarking: 


1.278 




1,255 








Total 


2,279 

1,502 
974 


254 

185 
50 


2.533 


Passengers embarking: 


1,687 




1,024 








Total 


2,476 

239 

186 

38 

25 

5 
30 


235 

111 

24 

1 


2,711 


Services to seamen: 


350 




210 




39 




25 


Seamen's identification certificates issued: 


14 

101 


19 




131 










523 

$12,423 66 

16.230 75 

$9,240.52 

3 
3 
3 
12 


251 
$1 978 19 
$1,201 88 
$1,599.28 


774 




$14,401 85 




$7,432 63 




$10,839.80 


8errices to American vessels: 


3 






3 




3 

5 


6 




17 



LOCK OPERATIONS. 

Lockages of commercial vessels were made during the month as follows: 





Number of lockages. 


Number of vessels. 




North. 


South. 


Total. 


North. 


South. 


Total. 




86 
90 
84 


64 
68 
67 


150 
158 
151 


96 
95 
96 


67 
68 
69 


163 




163 




165 















Army and Navy vessels, and vessels operated by The Panama Canal are included 
in the following summary of all lockages during the month : 



Lockages. 


_ , 1 Pedro 
Gatun. | Miguel. 


Miraflores. 


Commercial lockages 


1.-0 

52 

14 


158 
54 
34 


151 


Noncommercial, United States Army and Navy 


52 


Canal equipment 


31 






Total 


216 

163 
121 


246 

163 
155 


234 


Vessels: 

Commercial vessels 


165 


Noncommercial, United States Army and Navy 


144 






Total 


284 


318 


309 



Water consumed for all lockages amounted to 1,686,370,000 cubic feet, that used 
at Pedro Miguel becoming available for second use at Miraflores Locks. 
_ The number of lockages made during the month was the greatest of any month 
since the Canal has been in operation. 

Consumption of water during the month was as follows: 



38 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 





Cubic Feet. 




Gatun. 


Pedro Miguel. 


Miraflores. 




884,920,000 
20,000,000 


787,600,000 
25,930,000 
13,850,000 


707,190,000 




13,500,000 










Total 


904,920,000 


827,380,000 


720,690,000 







The main part of the Pacific Fleet, consisting of 8 battleships, 1 cruiser, 22 de- 
stroyers, and 3 miscellaneous crafts, was locked through the Canal during the month. 
The battleships New Mexico and Mississippi, each of 32,000 tons, with a length of 
624 feet and a beam of 97 feet 4£ inches, are the largest vessels which have ever 
transited the Canal. In the locks eight towing locomotives were used on each, and no 
difficulty was experienced in their lockage. The entire fleet was locked through 
without mishap. On July 24th, 1 battleship, 1 cruiser, 1 fuel ship, and 22 destroyers 
were locked through Gatun Locks southbound, besides 2 commercial ships, 1 north 
and 1 southbound, making a total of 27 ships passing through Gatun Locks on that 
day, which is a record. On July 25th, 5 dreadnaughts, and on July 26th, 1 dread- 
naught were locked through southbound. The time required for the lockage of the 
dreadnaughts through Gatun Locks was from 1 hour and 2 minutes to 1 hour and 
34 minutes. 

METEOROLOGY. 

The estimated average rainfall over the Gatun Lake watershed was 11.06 inches, 
compared with a 9-year mean of 10.89 inches, and the average over the Chagres River 
basin above Alhajuela was 16.71 inches, compared with an 18-year mean of 14.61 
inches. The rainfall for the month was generally deficient except over the upper 
Chagres drainage basin. The greatest monthly fall was at Porto Bello, totalling 24.23 
inches, and the minimum monthly fall was at Cucherbo, 3.60 inches. The greatest 
precipitation recorded in 24 hours was 3.90 inches, at Porto Bello on the 5th. 

Four slight seismic disturbances were recorded at Balboa Heights. They occurred 
on the 10th, 11th, 17th, and 22d. All were of very slight intensity in the Canal Zone, 
and resulted in no damage. 

The average Chagres River discharge at Alhajuela was 28 per cent below the 18- 
year July average, or 2,060 c. f. s. against a mean of 2,846 c. f. s. The Chagres fur- 
nished 40 per cent of the Gatun Lake total yield. There were no freshets in the 
Chagres River with a rise of more than 5 feet at Alhajuela. 

The elevation of Gatun Lake varied from a maximum of 85.29 feet on the 1st to 
a minimum of 84.99 feet on the 26th, averaging 85.12 feet. On July 31, it was 85.26 
feet. 

There was a decrease in storage of 140 million cubic feet. The draft on Gatun Lake 
for lockages and electric power was 2,067 c. f. s., compared with 2,014 c. f. s., for last 
month and 1,729 c. f. s., for July, 1918. The ratio of water used for hydroelectric 
power to that for Gatun Lake lockages was 2.28 to 1. The Brazos Brook reservoir 
and the Gamboa pumping plant drew 15,210,000 and 43,540,000 cubic feet, respective- 
ly, from Gatun Lake. 

ELECTRICAL DIVISION. 

Gatun hydroelectric station — The net output of the hydroelectric station for the 
month of July was 5,136,725 K. W. H., and the computed water consumption was 
3,849,877,200 cubic feet. There were no interruptions in service or failure of major 
equipment at this station. There were 25 spillway £ate operations during the month. 

Miraflores steam plant — One interruption in high tension service made it necessary 
for this station to pick up local load for 3 minutes. Extra boilers were cut in on line 
on two occasions to insure continuous service on the locks in case of line failure. 
This was necessary on account of extra heavy lockages while the Pacific Fieet was 
transiting the Canal. 

Total power output — The total net power output for both generating stations was 
4,945,525 K. W. H., and the total amount of power distributed to feeders by sub- 
stations and generating plants was 4,446,725 K. W. H., representing an energy loss of 
10.0 per cent. 

Transmission line — There was one interruption to transmission service during the 
month. Line No. 2 failed at 11.32 a. m., on the 23d, interrupting service at Cristobal 
3 minutes, Balboa 4 minutes, Gamboa 10 minutes, and Darien 3 minutes. This 
i nterruption was caused by crane No. 70 coming in contact with line between towers 
1-11 and 1-12 in the Cristobal yard of the Panama Railroad. 

Marine work — At Cristobal 12 orders were accomplished, embracing 17 items of 
repairs and additions on the following vessels: Allianca, Melville, tug Porto Bello, 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 39 

Caribbean, Salaverry, Keketticut, Panama, tug Tavernilla, General Ernst, Perou, 
Andra, and Advance. The work in progress on the Middlebury was 50 per cent com- 
plete and that on the Culebra 60 per cent complete at the end of the month. At 
Balboa electrical work was performed on the following vessels: Salaverry, submarine 
C-4, Anubis, Cristobal, Roman, barges Nos. 13 and 29, motorship Cap Palos, tug 
Gorgona, Trolltind, Transvaal, San Joaquin, Peru, Oraton, Keketticut, Azov, Santa 
Isabel, Ozette, Ahala, Snetind, Brookland, motorship Cap Finisterre, Mulpua, U. S. S. 
Cleveland, Fort Snelling, Fort Sill and Ossining. 

New construction work — The building work on the substation batteries at all four 
stations was completed. Installation of lighting in the new cold storage plant at 
Mount Hope was carried to 98 per cent of completion and the installation of electrical 
power equipment to 85 per cent of completion. Fifteen motors were placed in service. 
Electrical work at the slaughterhouse nearby was advanced to 95 per cent of com- 
pletion. Installation on Pier 6, Cristobal, was 65 per cent complete. Work was con- 
tinued on the power plant equipment at Coco Solo, and the exterior electrical work 
on the seaplane hangar was 95 per cent complete at the end of the month. No work 
was done on the 6,600-voIt extension to the fortified islands at Fort Amador, which 
remains 99 per cent complete. Installation of permanent armored feeder cable from 
Miraflores substation to the distribution house for the Miraflores Army post was 
advanced to 85 per cent of completion, and in the construction of underground duct 
lines, exclusive of manholes and pipe laterals to buildings at the post, 1,300 feet of 
8-way duct and 510 feet of 6-way duct were laid during the month. 

SHOPS, FOUNDRY, AND DRY DOCK WORK. 

The visit of the Pacific Fleet, incidental to its passage through the Canal, was of 
interest to the shops on account of work done for the fleet and likely to be done in 
the future. It is believed that the stationing of this fleet upon the Pacific means 
the opening of a new field of considerable magnitude for the shops of the Canal. 
Minor repairs were called for by a portion of the Naval vessels constituting the Pacific 
Fleet while in the Canal, all of which were handled without delay to any of the ships. 
The U. S. S. Cleveland remained at Balboa shops for repairs to opeiating equipment, 
which work was being carried forward at the end of the month, subject to the pro- 
vision that the ship must not be disabled to such an extent that she could not be ready 
for sea on 48 hours' notice. 

Repairs to the ex-German vessel Uarda (renamed Salaverry) were completed, 
successful sea trials were run, and the vessel was delivered to the Shipping Board on 
July 14. Repairs to the ex-German vessel Anubis (renamed Paita) were continued, 
but considerable delay is experienced by the nonreceipt of two main engine cylinders, 
numerous pumps, and the other material due from the United States. Most of this 
material was on board ships at New York at the time the recent shipping strike oc- 
curred, and completion of the A nobis will be delayed by approximately the equivalent 
of the time the vessels were delayed by the strike. 

The work on the steamship Cristobal of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line 
has been advancing as far as the undecided questions in connection with her overhaul 
admit. The structural arrangements within the vessel for carrying oil will differ so 
materially from those which will be used in case of adherence to coal burning that 
almost all of the lower part of the vessel is affected, while the proposed modifications 
for increased passenger-carrying introduced an almost equal number of uncertainties 
in the upper portion of the vessel. The interference with mails, with the consequent 
nonarrival of working decisions from the New York office, has thus operated to 
hamper consistent progress upon the vessel. 

The alterations to the steamship Middlebury advanced substantially during the 
month. 

The steamship Azov was placed in dry dock for repairs to bow and a general over- 
haul of the machinery. The lower half of her stern is being renewed, together w r ith 
about 25 pieces of bow plating and a considerable part of her framing system. The 
work on the vessel was about half completed at the end of July. 

The following vessels arrived for repairs at the Cristobal shops: Schooners A viator, 
Linda S., and Centinela, barges Nos. 26, 150, 28, 49, and 3, schooner Lt. Pegoud, 
steamer Poe, motorboat Orotina, tugs Porto Bello and Tavernilla, U. S. S. Itaska C-2, 
C-3, scout patrols Nos. 1841, 2232, and 2235, Cyama, Supply No. 1, coal hoist No. 1, 
subchaser No. 355, U. S. S. Supply, mine planter Graham, launch Psyche, transport 
Kilpatrick, steamships Advance, Hodges, Achilles, Middlebury, Culebra, General 
Ernst, Allianca, Caribbean, Panama, San Jose, Cartagena, Ucayali, Eldorado, Aban- 
garez, Lake Wilson, Catahna, Andra, Palena, Bushong, Salvador, Salaverry, Roman, 



40 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Santa Marta, West Celeron, Edsito, Manavi, Balboa, Antilla, Quittacas, Kanakee, 
Cauca, Oraton, Wayucan, and Finisterre. 

Of the above the following were in dry dock during the month: U. S. S. C-2, C-3, 
steamer Poe, tug Porto Bello, schooners Aviator and Linda S., scout patrols Nos. 
1841, 2232, 2235, coal hoist No. 1, barges Nos. 28, 26, 150, 3, 49, and steamship 
Cartagena. 

At the Cristobal shops 131 individual and company job orders were issued during 
the month, 8 of which were for work on Navy craft, none of which were submarines. 
Of the remaining 123, forty-four covered repairs to ships making this port or in 
transit of the Canal, exclusive of Panama Railroad ships. 

Work was performed at the Balboa shops during the month for the following vessels: 

U. S. S. Algonquin, Charleston, Chicago, Cleveland, Cuyama, Elliott, Houston, Maine, 
Phillips, Radford, Tarbell, Tacoma, Vermont, Wicks, Wisconsin, motorship Cap Palos, 
steamships Santa Isabel, Suzinne, Snetind, Ahala, Brookland, Benzonia, Cartagena, 
Culebra, motorship Cap Finisterre, steamships Cristobal, Eldorado, Fort Sill, Fort 
Snelling, Fort Russell, Goodspeed, General Ernst, Guardian, Gorgona, Rolph, Joan of 
Arc, Keketticut, Lake Sanfcrd, La Habra, La Primeria, Laura Hall, Middlebury, 
Marie de Ronde, Melville, Mulpua, Manavi, Ossining, Ozette, Oraton, Peru, Panama 
Raranga, San Joaquin, Salaverry, Transvaal, West Wind, Wayucan, and War Cavalry. 

The following vessels were in dry dock during the month at Balboa: Steamship 
Transvaal, motorship Trolltind, launch Limon, steamships Fort Russell, Oraton, Joan 
of Arc, Uarda, U. S. S. Chicago, launch Vacuum, steamships Benzonia, Brookland, tug 
Gorgoyia, steamships Middlebury, Azov, and Cristobal. 

Work on the four new 61-foot steel frame passenger coaches was continued, and 
two were completed and put into service. These cars, which have been trimmed with 
native wood of Panama and finished in the natural color, have occasioned pleasing 
comment. 

Foundry output, compared with that of June, was as follows: 





July. 


Jane. 




Pounds. 

143,3701 
45,070 
19,308 


Pounds. 
176,027 


Steel 


18,453} 




17.383} 



Equipment was hostled as follows: Locomotives, 1,598; cranes, 217; making a 
total of 1,815. One hundred and seventy-two shop and 1,420 field repairs were made 
on cars, 808 freight cars were repacked, and 2,259 passenger coaches were packed, 
cleaned, oiled, and inspected. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 

The construction work of the Building Division had reached the following status 
on July 31: 

Ward group No. 8 of the new Ancon Hospital buildings was completed and turned 
over to the Health Department for operation. 

Cement block walls of the lumber shed at Balboa were completed during the month. 

For the Puerto Obaldia radio station work was performed during the month on the 
construction of the towers, assembling material, etc. This was done at Cristobal, 
preparatory to sending the construction gang to Puerto Obaldia. 

Status of work on other buildings was as follows: 

The construction cf the abattoir building at Mount Hope was completed, and 
the installation of equipment was completed except in the offal room and the 
oleo and lard equipment. The plant was used by the Supply Department during the 
month. For the canning plant, a small amount of carpentry work was performed dur- 
ing the month ; the building remained 99 per cent completed. 

The boiler house and exterior steam lines of the coal storage plant were 99 per cent 
complete, and the installation of the boiler advanced fiom 70 to 90 per cent of com- 
pletion during the month. The machine shop at Mount Hope was 85 per cent com- 
pleted, and the caipenter shop there 75 per cent completed. The ten 12-family silver 
quarters at Mount Hope were 95 per cent completed. The office building for the 
Central & South American Telegraph Company at Balboa was 25 per cent completed. 
The tuberculosis ward of Corozal Hospital remained 80 per cent completed. The 
office for the Lighthouse Section at Gatun was 80 per cent completed. Construction 
of a temporary bone mill at Mount Hope was brought to completion. Construction 
of a fumigating shed at Pier 8 was completed. The erection of two houses fcr a sea- 
men's home at Balboa was 98 per cent completed. 

Terminal construction — Pier 6 was practically completed on July 1, except the side 
doors, cargo unloading masts, and approaches. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



41 



DREDGING DIVISION. 

The total excavation by dredges during July was 334,300 cubic yards, as follows: 



Cubic yards. Earth 



7,400 (a) 

9,200 (c) 

6,100 (c) 

21,300 (e) 

120,200 («) 

21,300 (<■) 

7,000 CO 

10,000 ( ff ) 

30,000 (g) 

8,500 (») 

94,300 (?) 



834,300 



7,400 

4,000 

3,100 

3,300 

120,200 

21,300 

4,500 



Rock. 



4,300 
2,000 

18, 000 i 



30,000 
8,500 
94,300 



2,500 
10,000 



297,500 36,800 



Character 
of work. 



Maintenance 

Maintenance... 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Maintenance... 
Maintenance. . . 

Aux. Const 

Construction. . . 
Maintenance... 
Construction... 
Maintenance. .. 

Total for month 



Stations. 



1441 to 1446-50 E. 

1424 to 1429-50 W 

1799-00 to 1802-00 W. 
1755-50 to 1765-00 W. 
Paraiso P. I. Imprv. 
1896-00 to 1902-00 W. 
Miraflores P. I. Imprv. 
2088-50 to 2093-50 W. 
2279-65 to 2289-50 W. 
2186-00 to 2196-00 W. 

Pier 6, Cristobal 

Balboa Inner Harbor. . , 
Balboa Inner Harbor. . . 
Balbc-i Inner Harbor. . . 
Balboa Inner Harbor. . . 



Equipment. 



Paraiso. 

Paraiso. 

Paraiso. 

Paraiso. 
No. 84- 
No. 86. 
Paraiso. 
Cascadas. 
Cascadas. 
No. 86. 
No. 86. 



(a) Gatun Lake section. 
(d) Miraflores Lake. 



(c) Gaillard Cut. 
(/) Atlantic terminals 



(<?) Pacific entrance. 
(h) Coco Solo. 



(g) Balboa inner harbor. 
CO Unmined rock. 



The following disposition was made of the excavated material : From the Pacific en- 
trance section, 3,300 cubic yards of earth and 18,000 cubic yards of rock were dumped 
at sea, 120,200 cubic yards of earth were handled through a pipeline 1,400 feet 
in length to the flats west of the channel, and 21,300 cubic yards of earth were piped 
1,700 feet to the San Juan fill. From the inner harbor at Balboa 40,000 cubic yards 
were dumped at sea, and 102,800 cubic yards of earth were deposited in the Diablo 
dump "A." A relay pump was used to assist the dredge in this work, with equal 
lengths of pipeline of 2,600 feet from the dredge to the relay and from the relay to 
the outfall. Twenty-one thousand seven hundred cubic yards of material excavated 
north of Gamboa were dumped in Gatun Lake. At the Atlantic entrance, 4,500 cubic 
yards of earth and 2,500 cubic yards of rock removed from north and south sides of 
Pier 6 were dumped between the land end of the East Breakwater and Margarita 
Point. 

On August 1 there remained to be excavated from the Canal prism, ocean to ocean, 
173,200 cubic yards of earth and rock and from the Cristobal coaling station and Bal- 
boa inner harbor, 169,900 cubic yards of earth and rock. The following table shows 
the distribution. 



Location. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


Gaillard Cut 




25,000 
86,900 


25,000 




61 ,300 


148,200 








61,300 


111,900 
2,100 
13,400 


173,200 




2,100 




154,400 


167,800 








154,400 


15,500 


169,900 








215,700 


127,400 


343,100 



Surveys covering all slide areas in the Gaillard Cut, and the Pacific entrance channel 
from Miraflores Locks to the steel dock south of Balboa harbor were made prior to 
the passing of the Pacific Fleet from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean. All slide areas 
were dragged and shoals marked. 

MUNICIPAL DIVISION. 

Jobs completed in July included the completion of the installation of pumps at the 
Submarine Base, Coco Solo, and water, sewers, and fire protection for barracks and 
mess hall at the Naval Air Station. The road to the Mount Hope cold storage plant 
was 85 per cent completed, and the extension of the road to Pier 6| Cristobal, 98 
per cent completed. At the Gatun Army post, grading was 65 per cent, track con- 
struction, 90 per cent, and the water lines 50 per cent completed. Work in the Ancon 
Hospital grounds was completed as far as authorized. The concrete platform at Bal- 
boa shops building No. 5 was completed. The work on the Army post at Miraflores 
advanced, grading being 85 per cent, tracks 98 per cent, and the water lines 80 per 
cent completed at the end of the month. 

Water pumped in the southern district amounted to 614,568,000 gallons, and in the 
northern district to 173,286,500 gallons, making a total of 787,854,500 gallons. This 



42 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



was an increase of 35,924,750 gallons over the quantity pumped in June. Colon was 
furnished with 46,593,600 gallons of water, Panama with 87,516,000 gallons and 
9,049,240 gallons were supplied to 271 ships. The incinerator at Gavilan Island burned 
2,050 tons of garbage and 31 dead animals during the month. 

WORKING FORCE. 

Effective July 23, 1919. 



Department or Division, 


Gold. 


Silver. 


TotaL 


Operation and Maintenance: 

Office 


34 
198 
210 
126 
126 
114 
949 
105 

45 


47 

1,662 

344 

2,848 

629 

859 

1,914 

376 

335 


81 


Building Division 


1,860 


Electrical Division 


554 




2,974 




755 


Dredging Division 


973 




2,863 


Marine Division 


481 


Fortifications 


380 






Total • ; 


1,907 

142 
25 
209 
30 
200 
241 
511 

48 
130 

79 

106 

5 


9,014 

1,848 
429 

1,453 

667 

13 

1,166 
198 

542 

280 

1,089 

894 

97 


10,921 


Supply Department: 


1,990 




454 


Commissary 


1,662 


Cattle Industry — Plantations 


697 


Accounting 


213 


Health 


1,407 


Executive 


709 


Panama Railroad: 

Superintendent _ 


590 


Transportation 


410 


Receiving and Forwarding Agent 


1,168 


Coaling Station 


1,000 


Hotel Washington 


102 






Grand total 


2,633 


17,690 


21 ,323 



The total gold force at work on July 23 was 343 more than the 3,290 at work on 
June 18, and the silver force was 619 more than the 17,071 then at work. As compared 
with the gold force for the corresponding month of last year, reported as of July 24, 
1918, the gold force was an increase of 61 1 over the 3,022 at work on that date, and 
the silver force an increase of 2,057 over the 15,633 of that day. 

The occupation of quarters on July 31, was as follows: 



Occupants. 


Men. 


Women. 


Children. 


Total. 


Americans 


3,259 

218 

5,322 


2,144 

41 

2,010 


2,595 

69 

3.809 


7,998 


Europeans 


328 




11,141 








Total 


8,799 


4,195 


6,473 


19,467 



Three hundred and seven new applications for gold family quarters were on file. 

PUBLIC HEALTH. 

Two hundred and sixty-two cases of malaria were admitted to hospitals. Two 
deaths occurred from malaria. Influenza cases admitted numbered 37. Six cases 
of pneumonia were admitted, and one death resulted from pneumonia. 
RECEIPTS AND SALES OF MATERIAL AND SUPPLIES. 

The value of material received during the month on United States requisitions was 
$439,572.67, as compared with $769,754.37 in June. Of that received in July, $415,- 
315.10 was chargeable to operation and maintenance; $18,301.81 to construction and 
equipment; and $5,955.76 to miscellaneous departments. Isthmian cash sales from 
storehouses and obsolete store amounted to $29,338.89, of which $27,092.62 was for 
stock, $1,402.20 for scrap, and $844.07 for obsolete and second-hand material. There 
were no important sales made in the United States during the month. 

The total sales of material from storehouses to steamships, exclusive of fuel oil, 
commissary supplies, and ice for the month was $15,593.54. Sales of commissary 
supplies to all purchasers for the month aggregated S S924.108.70, made up as follows: 
To steamships, other than United States Naval vessels, $63,080.18; to The Panama 
Canal, $133,205.24; to the United States Government, including sales to the Army 
and Navy, $160,321.39, of which sales to the Navy, including vessels in the Pacific 
Fleet, aggregated $97,753.93; to individuals and companies, principally through 
charge accounts in the retail stores, $16,662.10; to the Panama Railroad, including 
the Hotel Washington, $38,705.73; to individuals purchasing with coupons, $512,- 
134.06. 






THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



43 



FINANCIAL RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 
The cash balance in Canal appropriations on July 31, exclusive of fortifications, was 
$17,038,874.99; the balance in fortifications was $8,094,558.06. Payments from 
appropriations by the Disbursing Clerk in Washington amounted to $681,482.14 
and by the Paymaster on the Isthmus to $1,320,888.27. Purchases of commissary 
books from the Panama Railroad Company amounted to $301,485.28. Collections 
of tolls totaled $538,485.16. Deposits of $140,325.77 were made with the Assistant 
Treasurer of the United States to be applied on payment of tolls and other charges 
against vessels using the Canal. The total Panama Canal collections on the Isthmus 
were $1,081,530.74, and collections by the Disbursing Clerk, Washington, $757,076.56. 
Receipts from the Canal Zone and miscellaneous funds were $144,038.49, and dis- 
bursements from the same source amounted to $184,134.14. July pay rolls on the 
Isthmus aggregated $1,220,333.31 as compared with $1,132,073.23 for June, a 
difference of $88, 260. 08. 

Respectfully, 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending September 6, 1919. 



Same of vessel. 




Line or charterer. 



Compagnie Gencrale Transat'ique 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

Italian Steamship Line 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Peruvian Steamship Line 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Royal Netherlands Steamship Co. 

United Fruit Company 

Pacific Mail Steamship Line 

Anglo-American S. 8. Agency 

United Fruit Co 

Royal Mail Steamship Company. 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Panama Railroad Commissary.. . . 
Panama Railroad Steamshin Line. 



Arrived. 



August 31. 
August 31. 



August 1. 
August 1. 



September 3 . 
September 3.. 
September 3.. 



September 4.. 
September 4.. 
September 5.. 
September 5.. 



Departed. 



September 4. 
August 31. . . 
September 1. 
September 1 . 
September 2. 
September 2. 
September 2. 
September 2. 
September 2. 
September 4 . 
September 4.. 



September 4.. 
September 4.. 



September 6.. 

September C 



Cargo 



Discharged 



Tons. 
352 
106 



27 
836 



25 

940 

1,707 



11 

200 

1,736 

778 



Laded. 



Tout. 
9 
(*) 

925 

2,120 

1 

116 

663 J 

1,453 

631 

(*) 

393 



(*) 



4 

3,897 



*No cargo laded. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending September 6, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name «f vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 




•Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co 


September 2.. 
September 2... 
September 2.. . 




Tons. 


Tont. 
1* 








1 


San Juan 


Sentembpr 3.. . 


93 





Notice to Mariners.— Roncador Bank Light U Relighted. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C Z., Septembers, 1919. 
Circular No 643-64: 

Roncador Bank Light U, previously reported out of commission, was relighted on 
September 4, 1919: 

H. O. Charts 21-1007-1290-945-394-1374. 

H. O. Light List Vol. 1, 1919, No. 1432 D. 

Light List Atlantic and Gulf Coasts, 1919, page 388, No. 2303. 

H. O. Pub. 130-1918, page 202. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



44 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Roncador Cay, Caribbean Sea.— Reservation for Lighthouse Purposes. 

By the President of the United States of A merica, A Proclamation — 
Whereas, the Congress of the United States has provided by act of August 18, 
1856 (11 U. S. Statutes at Large, page 119; Sees. 5570 to 5578 U. S. Revised Statutes), 
that whenever any citizen of the United States, after the passage of the act, discovers 
a deposit of guano on any island, rock, or key, not within the lawful jurisdiction of 
any other government and shall take peaceable possession thereof and occupy the 
same, the island, rock, or key may, at the discretion of the President of the United 
States, be considered as appertaining to the United States. 

And Whereas, pursuant to the foregoing act of Congress, Roncador Cay in the 
western part of the Caribbean .Sea is now under the sole and exclusive jursidiction 
of the United States, and out of the jurisdiction of any other government. 

Now, Therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States, by 
virtue of the power in me vested, do hereby declare, proclaim, and make known that 
Roncador Cay, in the western part of the Caribbean Sea, be and the same is reserved 
for lighthouse purposes, such reservation being deemed necessary in the public 
interests, subject to such legislative action as the Congress of the United States may 
take with respect thereto. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be affixed. 

Done this fifth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred 
r 1 and nineteen, and of the Independence of the United States the one 

1 '' hundred and forty-third. 

WOODROW WILSON. 
By the President: 

William Phillips, 

Acting Secretary of State. 

[No. 1522-A.] 



New Form of Peddler's Permit. 

A new form of peddler's permit to sell articles of food in the Canal 
Zone has been printed which prohibits the sale of fresh meat and shell- 
fish. These permits are issued without fee upon the condition that the 
holder shall carefully observe the sanitary regulations of the Canal 
Zone and shall be subject to the directions of the officials of the Health 
Department in the conduct of his business. 

It is hereby directed that all persons desiring to peddle food in the 
Canal Zone secure new permits from the Division of Civil Affairs, 
room 301, Administration Building, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, on or 
before October 1, 1919. New permits may be secured in person or by 
mail. The old form of permits will not be accepted as authority for 
peddling foodstuffs on or after October 1, 1919. 

A copy of the new form of permit is published below. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 5, 1919. 

PERMIT TO SELL ARTICLES OF FOOD. 

License is hereby granted to 

to peddle articles "of food in the Canal Zone other than fresh meat and shellfish. 
This permit is issued upon the condition that the holder shall carefully observe the 
sanitary regulations of the Canal Zone and shall be subject to the direction of the 

officials of the Sanitary Department in the conduct of business.^ All frod- 

stuffs shall be protected against contamination by dirt or insects by being kept in 
suitable receptacles. 

Business conducted in United States Army camps shall be subject to such special 
regulations as may be prescribed by the military authorities. 

No authority is given under this permit for the sale of any article other than 
foodstuffs. 



Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 
Copy to Chief of Police. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 45 

Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal postcmces and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service 
Board, Balboa Heights (telephone 286): 

Dairy manufacturing specialist (male) ; §1,800 to $2,700 a year; October 14, 1919; age, under 45 
years.* 

Animal husbandman (male); $1,800 to $2,000 a year; October 14, 1919; form 2112; age, 21 yean 
but not 45 years.* 

Assistant animal husbandman (male); $1,200 to $1,500 a year; October 9, 1919; form 1312- age, 
21 years but not 45 years. 

Dairy editor (male); $2,000 to $2,500 a year; October 14, 1919; age, 25 years but not 45 years * 

Junior computer (male and female); $1,020 a year; October 8-9, 1919; form 1312; age, under 30 
years. 

Research assistant in agricultural geography (male and female) : $1,500 to $2,000 a year; October 8 
1919; form 1312; age, 21 years but not 50 years. 

Lithographic pressman (male) ; $l,600ayear; No. 431; September 30, 1919; form 1800; age, withia 
reasonable age limits.* 

Assistant fuel engineer (male), $1,620 to $2,160 a year; No. 443; October 7, 1919; form 2118; age, 
applications admitted regardless of age, but at request of department making appointments certifica- 
tion will be made of eligibles who have not reached their 36th birthday.* 

Engineer, $3,000 or over a year; assistant engineer, $1,800 to $2,880 a year; junior engineer, $1,200 
to $3,000 a year; engineering draftsman, $1,200 to $3,000 a year (male); No. 361-amended, supple- 
mental. 

The United States Civil Service Commission calls attention to the fact that from the foregoing ex- 
aminations for which applications may be filed with the Commission at Washington, D. C, at any time 
until further notice, it is expected that appointments will be made in connection with carrying out the 
provisions of the soldier land bill in the event this bill becomes a law. 

There is a continuing need in the Reclamation Service for eligibles for the positions of assistant en- 
gineer and junior engineer, at the salaries indicated above; but the demand for eligibles for the higher- 
salaried positions of engineer and engineering draftsman is contingent on the soldier land law bill 
becoming a law. 

* Nonassemhled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 



Local Civii Service Examinations. 

The following examinations will be held at Balboa Heights, C. Z., on the date* 
set opposite the titles thereof: 

Clerk, September 21, 1919. 

Postal Clerk, September 28, 1919. 

Stenographer and Typist, September 28, 1919. 

Full information in regard to the scope and the character of the examinations is contained in pam- 
phlet form 1424, Information for Applicants for Stenographer and Typewriter Examination, a copy of 
which may be obtained from the Secretary of the Civil Service Board, Administration Building, Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. Applicants for the Clerk examination must take at least one optional subject in ad- 
dition to the regular basis subjects. The optional subjects are: First, typewriting; second, bookkeep- 
ing; third, general business training and experience; fourth, timekeeping training and experience. 
If the third optional is taken, three letters of recommendation from former employers should accompany 
the application. 

Applicants for the examination for Postal Clerk must show that they have had at least one year's 
experience as clerk in the United States or Canal Zone postoffices or as postmaster or as Navy mail 
clerk, and that they are familiar with the receipt, distribution and dispatch of mail matter, the issuance 
of money orders, registration of mail, and the preparation of various reports required of postmasters. 

Applicafon form No. 1312 must be filled out, including the medicial certificate but excluding the 
county officers' certificate, and should be filed promptly with the Board of Civil Service Examiners at 
Balboa Heights. C. Z. 

Applicants must have reached their 20th but not their 45th birthday on the date of the examination, 
must be citizens of the United States, physically sound and in good health. 

Applicants m ust submit to the examiner on the day of tne examination their photographs taken within 
2 years, securely pasted in the place provided in the admission cards sent them after their applications 
are filed. 

Applicants for the Clerk examination in answer to question 1 and on the outside of the form should 
State the optional subject taken in addition to the name of the examination required. 

In answer to question No. 4, applicant must show residence in some State or Territory of the United 
States from the time of taking up residence therein to September, 1919, on account of temporary employ- 
ment on the Canal Zone and their retention of legal residence in the United States. The same must be 
shown as to the county. 

This examination is scheduled on the dates shown especially to provide for the examination of soldiers, 
sailors, marines, field clerks, and enlisted army and navy nurses who were unable to compete after 
April 6, 1917, and who are allowed 60 days from August 1, 1919, to do so, if tney have been discharged 
prior to that date. Those discharged later will be allowed 60 days after discharge to compete; but, 
owing to our distance from the United States and the delay in receiving questions, all such persons 
should compete if possible on the date above mentioned. 

Thpse examinations will also be open to any other applicants desiring to be examined for The Panama 
Canal Service. 

Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," or "The Panama 
Canal. Washington, D. C." 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama' ; in th« 
United States, "Pancanal, Washington." 



46 



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48 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Executive Order.— Registry of Foreign Built Vessels. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 28, 1919. 
Circular No. 601-95: 

In pursuance of the authority conferred upon the President of the United States by 
section 2 of the act approved August 18, 1914,* entitled "An Act to provide for the 
admission of foreign-built ships to American registry for the foreign trade, and for 
other purposes," it is hereby ordered: 

That the provisions of law requiring survey, inspection and measurement, by officers 
of the United States, of foreign-built ships admitted to United States registry under 
said Act are hereby suspended so tar and for such length of time as is herein provided, 
namely: The said provisions shall not apply to any such foreign-built ship during the 
period of eighteen months from September 1, 1919, provided the Secretary of Com- 
merce is satisfied in the case of any such ship that the ship is safe and seaworthy and 
that proper effort is being made to comply with the said provision. 

The White House, WOODROW WILSON. 

August 8, 1919. 

♦Published as circular No. 600-11. The Executive Order of August 8, 1919, above, has beea 
published as circular No. 6C1-9S. 



End of Contributions to the War Relief Fund. 

Payroll deductions of contributions to the war relief fund of the 
American National Red Cross by employees of The Panama Canal 
and the Panama Railroad were discontinued after July 31. Contri- 
butions began July 1, 1917, when a number of employees authorized 
the deduction each month of one per cent of their pay, and the total 
contributions to the war fund, made by payroll deduction and in 
cash, amounted to $136,279.46. Thanks to the community have been 
expressed by national and local headquarters. 



Official Circulars. 



Act of Congress. — Appropriations, Fiscal 
Year 1920, Made Available July 1, 1919. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., August 27, 1919. 
Circular No. 600-65: 

The Act of Congress quoted below is published 
for the information of all concerned. 

Chester Harding. 

Governor. 



8. Reimbursement for meals taken at a Panama 
Canal restaurant having a la carle service only is 
limited to 35 cents for the morning meal, and 45 
cents per meal for the noon and evening meal, or a 
total of $1.20 per day. At hotels where regular 
meals are served, reimbursement is limited to 
the price of such meals. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Joint Resolution to ratify and confirm from and 
including July 1, 1919, obligations incurred 
pursuant to the terms of certain appropria- 
tions for the fiscal year 1920. 
Resolved by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled. That appropriations for the service 
of the fiscal year 1920, contained in the Agri- 
cultural, Army, District of Columbia, Navy, and 
Sundry Civil Appropriations Acts, and the "Third 
Deficiency Appropriation Act, fiscal year, 1919," 
shall be available from and including July 1, 1919, 
for the purposes respectively provided in the said 
appropriations for the service of the said fiscal 
year. And all obligations incurred pursuant to 
the terms of such appropriations in the aforesaid 
Acts as approved are ratified and confirmed from 
and including July 1, 1919. 
Approved, July 31, 1919. 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., September 2, 1919. 
Circular No. 211: 

Effective September 2, 1919, Mr. W. F. Foster 
is designated an accountable official of The Pana- 
ma Canal, vice Mr. S. W. Heald, and as such 
will account for all nonexpendable property 
in use by the Superintendent of The Panama 
Railroad and The Panama Canal transportation. 
H. A. A. Smith, 
Approved: Auditor. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Reimbursement for Meals. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 29, 1919. 
Circular No. 658-5: 

Paragraph 8 of circular No. 658-4, dated No- 
vember 24, 1916, is amended to read as follows, 
effective September 1, 1919: 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., September 3, 1919. 
Circular No. 212: 

Effective as of September 2, 1919, Mr. G. S. 
Briggs is designated an accountable official of 
The Panama Canal, vice Mr. Arthur V. Dayton, 
and as such will account for all storehouse stock 
at The Panama Canal Press. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Approved: Auditor. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign. $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Offiae 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 17, 1919. No. 5. 

Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending September 13, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Line or charterer. 



Arrived. 



Departed. 



Cargo — 



Discharged Laded 



Zaoapa 

Iquitos 

Ellerdale 

Cartago 

Cauca 

San Juan._ 

Saint Louis. . . . 

Nortonian 

Urubamba 

Salvador 

Atenas 

William Green. 

Advance 

Euasco 

Laura C. Hall. . 

Balboa 

Santa Marta. . . 

Middlebury 

Panama 

Buford. ; 

NameoVi 



United Fruit Company 

Peruvian Steamship Line 

Roval Mail Steam Packet Co 

United Fruit Company 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Mail Steamship Line 

Compagnie Gen. Transatlantic^.. 

Levland Line .-•••.• 

Peruvian Steamship Line 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United Fruit Company 

Anglo-American Steamship Agency 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 

United Fruit Company. . ; 

Anglo-American Steamship Agency 

Terminal Shipping Agency 

United Fruit Company 

Panama Railroad Commissary.. . . . 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 

United States Government _. . . . 

Pa"flmi R'li'rnid Stenmshin Lne. . 



September 
September 



September 
September 



8.. 



September i 
September ! 
September ! 



September 7.. 
September 13. 
September 8.. 
September 9.. 
September 13. 
September 9.. 



September 
September 



September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 



September 10. 
September 11. 
September 12. 
September 13. 



September 11. 



Tons. 



1,525 



1,479 
1,214 



1001 
1,509 
2,641 



766 
9,900 



2,252 
41 

' 663 

'■W 2 
600 

3,735 
272 

2,745 



Tons. 

, 1 

822) 

3,132 

106 

1,113 

1,988 



1,053 
184 
C) 
1,562} 



*No cargo laded. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending September 13, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 






September 7.. . 
September 8.. . 
September 9... 
September 8.. 
September 9.. . 
September 10.. 
Sentember 10.. 


September 8.. . 
September 8.. . 


Tons. 
734 
1 


Tons. 
117 




Pacific Metals Corporation 






11 


Laura C.Hall 


September 10.. 
September 9.. . 
September 10.. 
Sent ember 11.. 


7 
1 
1 

52 










Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Colombia Maritime ^o 




Balboa 





Free Ertry Requests Approved in City of Panama. 

In compliance with the request of the Government of Panama, in 
the handling of requests for the free entry of goods for employees of 
the United States Government on the Isthmus, copies will no longer 
be forwarded to the Captain of the Port of Colon for approval but 
three copies of approved requests will be forwarded to the Secretary 
of Finance and Treasury, in the city of Panama, by the Executive 
Secretary. To avoid delay, these will be delivered and called for by a 
messenger of the Police and Fire Division. 

This change does not affect the procedure of employees in submitting 
the request (Form 164-2) in sextuplicate through the head of the 
department or division or the procedure of forwarding the request 
by the head of the department or division to the Executive Secretary; 
the only change is in connection with the administration in Panama. 



50 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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err! 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



51 



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52 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Prices of Various Commodities for Ships. 

The Supply Department has issued the following bulletin, effective 
September 1, 1919, of prices to individuals and companies, on commodi- 
ties listed: 



Commodity. 


Unit. 


Prioo. 




Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 

Bag 
Bag 
Bag 
Bag 

Bag 

Bag 

Bag 

Bag 

Cwfc 

Lb. 

Gal. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

M ft. B.M. 

M ft. B.M. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

42-gal. bbL 
42-gal. bbl. 
42-gal. bbL 

42-gal. bbl. 
42-gal. bbl. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

GaL 

Gal. 

GaL 

GaL 

GaL 

Gal. 

GaL 

GaL 

GaL 

Gal. 

GaL 

GaL 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

GaL 

Gal. 

Gal. 

GaL 

Gal. 

Lb. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

GaL 

Gal. 

GaL 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Gal. 

GaL 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb, 


$0.46 




.62 




.41 


Cement, at Panama: 


1.1925 




.085 




1.765 




.25 


Cement, at Colon: 


1.0475 

.085 




1.88 




.25 


Charcoal 


.75 




.41 




.38 




.11 


Lead, pig 


.11 


Lumber, yellow pine or fir (except ceiling) 


57.08 




74.00 


Metal, yellow 


.60 




.24) 




.20 




.00 




.08 




.17 


Oakum, Navy, unspun 


.16 


Fuel oil, at Balboa and Cristobal — in bulk: 


•2.00 




•2.00 




•2.04 


Fuel oil, at Balboa and Cristobal — in drums or barrels: 


•2.25 




•2 25 


Oils, greases, and lubricants: 


.62 




.37 




1.08 




.75 




.70 




.63 




.55 




.475 




.45 




.78 




.84 




.20 




.27 




1.80 




1.80 




.20 


Oil, lard 


1.40 




.03 




.60 




1.00 




.33 




.55 




.27 




.08 




.31 




2.42 


Oil, signal 


1.10 


Oil, valve 


.45 


Oil, car 


.18 


Vaclite 


.18 


Wax, lamp 


.09 




.05 


Grease, vellnw. cud. No. 3 


.10 


Grease, yellow, cup, No. 5 


.12 




.18 


Grease, tunnel, bearing -. 


.13 


Tallow 


.15 


Turpentine 


1.05 




.37 


Vaseline ; 


.00 




.10 




.12 


Paint, zinc, white, dry 


.18 


Paint, zinc, white, in oil 


.18 




.10 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



53 



Commodity. 


Unit. 


Price. 




Lb. 
Cft. 
Cft. 
Cft. 
Cft. 
Cft. 
Cft. 
Cft. 
Cft. 
Cft. 
Cft. 
Cft 
Cft 
Cft. 
Cft. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 


$0 08 




75 




1 65 




2 85 




4 50 




4 75 




6 00 




7 50 




10 00 




13 00 




27 00 




33 00 




35 00 




80 00 




100 00 




05 




10 




08 




05 




.05 


Tin, block 


78 




80 




10 


Washers, cut 


.10 




.17 




.12 



• No surcharge. 



Notice to Mariners.— Lights Established, Panama Canal. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 13, 1919. 
Circular No. 643-65 : 

Lights at the Panama Canal have been established as follows: 

Balboa Harbor — A light, electric, red, flashing, 1 second light, 1 second dark, on the 
top of shed on northern extremity Dock 4, Balbca Harbor, to mark the end of the 
dock. Height of focal plane 45 feet. 

Miraflores Approach, Southern end, West bank — A light, electric,*white, flashing, 
1 second light, 1 second dark, focal plane 8 feet, exhibited from iron standard or small 
wooden float, painted black, to mark the edge of the navigable channel, in 30 feet 
mean low water. This float is placed there temporarily, to take the place of former 
Beacon No. 9, until dredging operations are resumed. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 

Refrigeration Plant Installed at Pedro Miguel Commissary. 

A refrigerating plant has been installed and is now in operation at 
Pedro Miguel commissary. It is up-to-date cold storage equipment, 
furnished with refrigeration from the Pedro Miguel restaurant. Three 
rooms are supplied with refrigeration. Two of these are used for 
keeping meat, poultry, and similar commodities. The third and largest 
room is used for such purposes as the keeping of vegetables and the 
cutting of meat. The counter box has also been refrigerated, whereby 
a much lower temperature has been obtained than is possible through 
the use of ice. Improvement in the handling and keeping of supplies 
is consequently resulting. 

Weather Conditions in August, 1919. 

Rainfall during the month of August was generally deficient over the Canal Zone 
and vicinity. Totals ranged from 4.02 inches at Miraflores to 18.48 inches at Indio. 
The greatest amount of rainfall on any one day was 4.78 inches, at Porto Bello on the 
14th. 

The estimated average rainfall over Gatun Lake watershed was 9.42 inches, com- 
pared with a 9-year mean of 11.56 inches, and the average over the Chagres River 
basin above Alhajuela was 13.60 inches, compared with an 18-year mean of 14.35 
inches. 

Reference to a severe electric storm which occurred on the Atlantic side on August 
5, during which an observation balloon at Coco Solo was burned and the mess hall 
struck by lightning and slightly damaged was made in The Panama Canal Record 
of August 13. 



54 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



The air temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind movement, and evaporation were 
all slightly above normal, while the relative humidity was slightly below. The day- 
time cloudiness was above normal on the Atlantic coast and below on the Pacific. 
No fogs were observed on either coast but a number of fogs occurred over the interior, 
most of which lifted or were dissipated by 9 a. m. 

Gatun Lake hydrology — Mean elevation of GatunLake, 85.12 feet; maximum, 85.29, 
on the 31st; minimum, 85.00 on August 3-4-5; evaporation from Gatun Lake 
surface, 4.548 inches; rainfall on Gatun Lake drainage basin, 9.42 inches; total 
yield of Gatun Lake watershed, 4.44 inches on watershed. The total yield amounted 
to 47 per cent of the rainfall. 

The following table gives a summary of the weather conditions during the month: 





"So 
o §■«■ 

m ° O 


Temperature. 


£'■3 

s = 

»M-3 


Precipitation. 


Wind. 


Stations. 


a 
3 

81.4 
80.8 
81.2 
80 3 


a 

3 

a 

•p. 

09 

s 

92 
87 
92 

89 


a 


a 

3 

a 
•a 


ej 

"5 
« 


"cS 

"o 

H 


> 
& 

C cj 
O bO 

C3 

02 


<u 

SB 


If 

,5a 


a 

M 

'c3 £ 

N.W. 
W. 

N.E. 
N. 


I| 
S.S 

32 

28 
25 
23 


a 
^o 

1 

3 




Sslboa 
Heights . . 


29.730 
2S.818 


Aug. 4 
Aug. 24 
Ang 17* 

Aug. 24 


72 
73 

72 
72 


Aug. 20 
Aug. 21 
Aug. 13 
Aug. 20 


85.1 

85.2 


5.82 
6 77 
7.37 
9.07 


7.72 
14 83 
11.77 
13.99 


22 

22 
26 
23 


48.84 
68.23 
31.42 

43.58 


s.w. 

s. 
s. 

E. 


Aug. 5 
Aug. 21 
Aug. 5 
Aug. 5 







* And other dates. 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
■Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
•or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. AH 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seai, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of— 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by- 


Date of death. 




20329 
26935 
32807 
20154 


British Guiana. . 
R<?p. of Panama. 

Jamaica 


Ancon Hospital.. Health Department. . 
Panama Police anH Fire Div. . 


August 19, 1919. 
August 24, 1919. 
August 23, 1919. 
August 29. 1919. 


Clarence Delvalle 
Andreas Quintana. . . . 
Frederick A. White. . . 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal postofnces and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested mav obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights', (telephone 286): 

Welfare worker (female) ; $1,200 to $1,600 a year; October 8, 1919; form 1312; age, more than 25 
years. 

Radio clerk (male) ; $1,000 a year; October 8, 1919; form 1312. age, more than 18 years. 

Senior highway engineer (male) ; $2,200 to $4,000 a year; October 21, 1919; form 1312; age, not 
50 years.* 

Field superintendent in insect control (male); $1,800 to $2,400 a year; No. 453; October 4, 1919; 
form 2118; age, 25 years but not 50 years.* 

Laboratory assistant (male); $1,600 a year; No. 198-amended, supplemental; September 17-18, 
$919; form 1312. 

Expert radio aid (male); Grade 1, $7.04 per diem; Grade 2, $10 per diem; Grade 3, $12 per diem; 
No. 435; October 7, 1919; form 2118; age, within reasonable age limits. 

Claims examiner (male); $1,800 a year; No. 437; October 8, 1919; form 1312; age, 21 years but 
not 50 years. 

Technical expert (male) ; $1,800 a year; No. 446; October 14, 1919; form 1312; age, not less than 
20 years.* 

Physicist, qualified in optics (male); $3,600 to $4,000 a year; No. 445; October 14, 1919; form 
51312; age, within reasonable age limits.* 

File clerk (male and female) ; $1,000 to $1,200 a year; No. 77-amended; September 17, October 22, 
November 19, and December 10, 1919; form 1312; age, not under 18 years. 

Trained nurse (.male and female) (Panama Canal service); $95 a month (female); $100 a month 
<male); No. 269-amended; October 22, 1919, December 10, 1919; form 1312; age, males 20 to 40 
years, females 20 to 35 years. 

Clerk (Bureau of the Census) (male and female); $900 to $1,020 a year; October 18, 1919; form 304; 
age, 18 years but not 50 years. 

*Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 55 

Local Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations will be held at Balboa Heights, C. Z., on the datM 
set opposite the titles thereof: 

Clerk, September 21. 1919. 

Postal Clerk. September 28, 1919. 

Stenographer and Typist, September 28, 1919. 

Full information in regard to the scope and the character of the examinations is contained in pam- 
phlet form 1424, Information for Applicants for Stenographer and Typewriter Examination, a copy of 
which may be obtained from the Secretary of the Civil Service Board, Administration Building, Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. Applicants for the Clerk examination must take at least one optional subject in ad- 
dition to the regular basis subjects. The optional subjects are: First, typewriting; second, bookkeep- 
ing; third, general business training and experience; fourth, timekeeping training and experience. 
If the third optional is taken, three letters of recommendation from former employers should accompany 
the application. 

Applicants for the examination for Postal Clerk must show that they have had at least one year's 
experience as clerk in the United States or Canal Zone postoffices or as postmaster or as Navy mail 
clerk, and that they are familiar with the receipt, distribution and dispatch of mail matter, the issuance 
of money orders, registration of mail, and the preparation of various reports required of postmasters. 

Application form No. 1312 must be filled out, including the medicial certificate but excluding the 
county officers' certificate, and should be filed promptly with the Board of Civil Service Examiners at 
Balboa Heignts. C. Z. 

Applicants must have reached their 20th but not their 45th birthday on the date of the examination, 
must be citizens of the United States, physically sound and in good health. 

Applicants must submit to the examiner on the day of tne examination their photographs taken within 
2 years, securely pasted in the place provided in the admission cards sent them after their application! 
are filed. 

Applicants for the Clerk examination in answer to question 1 and on the outside of the form should 
Itate the optional subject taken in addition to the name of the examination required. 

In answer to question No. 4, applicant must show residence in some State or Territory of the United 
States from the time of taking up residence therein to September, 1919, on account of temporary employ- 
ment on the Canal Zone and their retention of legal residence in the United States. The same must be 
shown as to the county. 

This examination is scheduled on the dates shown especially to provide for the examination of soldiers, 
sailors, marines, field clerks, and enlisted army and navy nurses who were unable to compete after 
April 6, 1917, and who are allowed 60 days from August 1, 1919, to do so, if tney have been discharged 
prior to that date. Those discharged later will be allowed 60 days after discharge to compete; but, 
owing to our distance from the United States and the delay in receiving questions, all such persona 
should compete if possible on the date above mentioned. 

These examinations will also be open to any other applicants desiring to be examined for The Panama 
Canal Service. 

Tourist Cruises. 

A series of 11 cruises to the Isthmus, each to contain from 120 to 
140 persons, has been scheduled for the coming dry season by the 
United Fruit Company, the American Express Company, Thomas 
Cook & Son, and the Raymond & Whitcomb Company. The first 
party is scheduled to arrive at Cristobal about January 11, and the 
others will follow at weekly intervals. 



Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds Operating Boat Club. 

The operation of the Yacht Club at Balboa passed from private con- 
trol to the management of the Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds on 
September 10, on request of a majority of the members, and it will 
hereafter be operated along the lines of the other Canal clubhouses. 
Locker space will be rented and boats cared for at the rate of $3 per 
month, as before, and in other respects the house will be open to all 
gold employees. The name has been changed from Yacht Club to Boat 
Club. An effort will be made to stimulate its use, especially in con- 
nection with swimming at Farfan beach, on the west side of the Canal, 
opposite the clubhouse. 

Information concerning use of the property for private parties and 
dances may be obtained from the matron at the Boat Club (telephone 
778, Balboa), the secretary of the clubhouse at Balboa (telephone 800), 
or the General Secretary at Balboa Heights (telephone 200). 



Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is. "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," or "The Panama 
Canal, Washington, D. C." 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmu9. is "Pancanal, Panama"; in the 
United States, "Pancanal. Washington." 



56 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Joint Commission. 



Decision of the Umpire. 

In the matter of the claim of B. Burns 
Duncan for the Quebrada de Oro Plan- 
tation and Mining Company, located in 
the District of Empire, Canal Zone. Amount 
claimed: $100,000. 

Decision of the Umpire, judgment No. 
427, docket No. 3003, August 30, 1919. 

I. 

The hearing of the above-entitled claim 
commenced before the Joint Commission 
on December 2, 1918, and was concluded 
on December 10, 1918. The claimant, 
in reviewing the vicissitudes which the 
Quebrada de Oro mine, subject of this 
claim, had encountered, stated that it had 
been worked prior to the year 1882 by an 
American company from Philadelphia. 
Shortly after beginning operations this 
company was forced to abandon the proj- 
ect on account of the death of the repre- 
sentatives of the company and of the son 
of the president, caused by an epidemic of 
yellow fever which developed at that 
time. Only a guard remained at the 
mine on account of the panic whjch was 
created by this epidemic. 

After some timehad elapsed an engineer 
was sent from the United States to con- 
tinue the exploitation of the mine but 
this time operations were suspended on 
account of the "periodical revolution." 
The guard, believing that the mine had 
been completely abandoned, proceeded 
to sell the machinery belonging to the 
collapsed enterprise in order to collect his 
6alary which was due. 

A number of employees of the French 
Canal Company then organized a new 
company to work the abandoned mine, 
the present claimant being a member 
thereof. Another engineer was sent for, 
but soon after his arrival he was unfor- 
tunately killed in a fight, and as a conse- 
quence the work of the Quebrada de Oro 
mine was again paralyzed. The dis- 
couraged stockholders decided to dissolve 
the company, and in the year 1889 the 
claimant requested from the Government 
of Colombia the right to exploit the mine. 
Having obtained permission he organized 
a company under the name of "The 
Colombian Gold Mining Company." 



The claimant explained to the satis- 
faction of the Commission the reason the 
documents were not in his name, the 
reason he was using an assumed name, 
and why it was that his wife, and not him- 
self, acquired rights from the Government 



El Arbitro de la Comlsi6n Mixta Es- 
tados Unidos de America — Rep6b- 
lica de Panama, Panama. 

Reclamacion de B. Burns Duncan en 
representacion de "The Quebrada de Oro 
Plantation and Mining Co." enclavada en 
el Distrito de Emperador, Zona del Canal. 
Cantidad reclamada: $100,000. 

Decision del Arbitro, regla No. 427, ex- 
pediente No. 3003, 30 de Agosto de 1919. 

I. 

En la audiencia de esta reclamacion 
celebrada ante la Comision Mixta del 
2 al 10 de Diciembre de 1918, el recla- 
mante haciendo la historia de las vicisi- 
tudes por que habia pasado la mina de- 
nominada Quebrada de Oro, objeto de la 
presente reclamacion, manifesto que 
habia sido trabajada con anterioridad al 
aho 1882, por una compahia americana de 
Philadelphia, que hubo de abandonarla a 
poco de comenzar los trabajos, a causa 
de la epidemia de fiebre amarilla que se 
desarrollo por entonces, y de la que fue- 
ron victima los representantes de la 
Compafiia, con el hijo de su Presidente. 
Tal fue el panico que este creo que solo 
un guarda quedo al frente de la mina. 

Transcurrido algun tiempo, enviaron 
de los Estados Unidos un ingeniero para 
recomenzar las obras, pero esta vez fue la 
"revolucion periodica" la causa de su 
paralizacion. 

El guarda de la mina la consider6 
completamente abandonada, y procedio 
a la venta de las herramientas pertene- 
cientes a la fracasada empresa, con objeto 
de cobrarse los salarios que se le adeuda- 
ban. 

Entre varios empleados de la Com- 
pafiia del Canal frances, se organizo otra 
nueva, para reanudar los trabajos de la 
mina abandonada, de cuya Compafiia 
formo parte el actual reclamante. 

Se envio a buscar a los Estados Unidos 
otro ingeniero, y llego, pero con tan mala 
fortuna, que a poco lo mataron en una 
reyerta, quedando nuevamente paraliza- 
da la explotacion de la mina Quebrada 
de Oro. 

Desanimados los accionistas, decidie- 
ron disolver la Compafiia, y entonces el 
reclamante (afio- 1889) solicit 6 del 
Gobierno de Colombia el derecho de 
explotacion de la misma, y una vez 
obtenido, organizo una Compafiia con 
el titulo de "The Colombian Gold Min- 
ing Company." 

El reclamante manifest6 a satisfacci6n 
de la Comision Mixta por que causas 
los documentos est an expedidos a nom- 
bre que no es el suyo, por que pasaba a la 
sazon con nombre supuesto, y por cjue fue 
su esposa, y no el, quien intervino ea la 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



57 



of Colombia and organized the above- 
mentioned company. 

Operations were again begun with 
great expectations because they were 
working an open vein which had evi- 
dently been discovered by the assassi- 
nated engineer, but a little more than 3 
months later t his vein was exhausted, and 
it has not been lound again in spite of the 
fact that 27 years have elapsed since that 
time. The claimant, however, is of the 
opinion that the vein has not been lost. 
He believes that it has simply sunk as a 
result of the earthquakes which are prev- 
alent in these Central American coun- 
tries, and that by excavating to a greater 
depth the valuable gold vein can again 
be located. At all events, the stockhold- 
ers were not of the same opinion for they 
decided to suspend operations of the 
mine and to engage in agricultural pur- 
suits. In view of this intention the new 
name of "The Quebrada de Oro Planta- 
tion and Mining Company" was given 
to the company, and its representative 
claims from the Government of the 
United States the sum of $100,000 on 
account of the expropriation of the land 
where these two ventures might have 
been carried on. 



The claimant stated that in May, 1918, 
a few months before this claim was heard 
before the Joint Commission, he engaged 
Mr. Alex Gair Davidson, Bachelor of 
Science of the University of Dunedin, 
New Zealand, and resident of Panama 
since January, 1917, to write a report 
from a mining standpoint, on the com- 
mercial value of the land subject of this 
claim. 

According to the report of Mr. David- 
son^ the mineral zone of the land is 
divided into two sections — the "Que- 
brada de Oro" and the "Rio Sardinilla." 
The map which accompanies the report 
marks the exact location of these sec- 
tions. 

He stated that the principal part of the 
work which was done in the mine was ac- 
complished in the time of the Spaniards, 
and by the company which exploited it 
prior to the year 1882. He further stated 
that in making his examination of the 
ground he discovered a number of gold- 
bearing veins; that the possibility of ob- 
taining water in sufficient quantities to 
work the mine at all times, including the 
dry season, would greatly facilitate its op- 
eration, and that in his opinion it would 
be a paying proposition. He presented 
seventy-four samples taken from dif- 



adquisicion de los derechos de parte del 
Gobierno de Colombia y en la formacion 
de la Compania de referencia. 

Al organizarse esta, recibio cinco mil 
dollars ($5,000) en efectivo, mas el 
50 per cent en los intereses de la empresa. 

Entonces se trabajo la mina con gran- 
des esperanzas, porque se explotaba un 
filon descubierto, segiin parece, por el 
ingeniero asesinado, pero poco despues 
de trcs meses se agoto el filon, y no se ha 
vuelto a dar con el a pesar de los 27 afios 
trascurridos desda entonces. 

El reclamante, no obstante, es de 
opinion que el filon no se ha agotado: 
piensa que a causa de los movimientos 
sismicos peculiares a estas tierras centro 
americanas, el filon se ha hundido sim- 
plemente, y es solo cuestion de ahondar 
algo mas, para dar con la valiosa vena de 
oro. 

De todas suertes, los accionistas no 
debieron participar de la missma opinion, 
al desistir en su proposito de explotar la 
mina, y pensar dedicarse a la agricultura, 
para lo cual solicitaron un prestamo en los 
Estados Unidos, prestamo que no ma- 
terialize. 

Por este doble aspecto de las empresas 
a que debia haberse dedicado la "Com- 
pania Agricola-minera Quebrada de 
Oro," es por lo que se le dio nuevo titulo, 
y su representante reclama del Gobierno 
de los Estados Unidos la suma de $100,- 
000 por la expropiacion del terreno 
donde aquellas pudieron haber existido. 

El reclamante manifesto que en Mayo 
de 1918, pocos meses antes de verse la 
reclamacion ante la Comision Mixta, 
encomendo a Mr. Alex Gair Davidson, 
Bachiller en Ciencias por la Universidad 
de Dunedin, Nueva Zelandia, y residente 
en Panama desde Enero de 1917, la 
redaccion de una Memoria a fin de 
determinar el valor comercial del terreno 
objeto de esta reclamacion, en concepto 
de propiedad minera. 

Segiin la opinion de Mr. Davidson la 
zona minera de este terreno comprende 
dos secciones: la parte de la Quebrada 
de Oro, y la del Rio Sardinilla. En el 
mapa que acompana a la Memoria, se 
localiza la posicion precisa de dicha9 
secciones. 

Con respecto a la importancia de los 
trabajos realizados en la mina, considera 
que los principales fueron los llevados a 
cabo en tiempo de los espanoles, y des- 
pues, los que realizo la compania que la 
exploto con anterioridad al ano 1882. 
Manifiesta que en los examenes sobre el 
terreno ha descubiertos varias vetas 
auriferas; que la posibilidad de obtener 
agua para los trabajos en cantidad 
suficiente, en toda epoca, incluso en la 
temporada de secas, aconseja la explota- 
cion de la mina; y es de opinion que sus 
trabajos serian de resultados comerciales. 



58 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



ferent sections of the land the analysis of 
which shows a percentage of gold up 
to |8 per cubic yard. He explained in 
technical detail the commercial value of 
the mine; the work necessary to be done 
in order to exploit it ; the most favorable 
season to do the work; and after cal- 
culating the expenses and the production 
the following figures resulted: 



Expenses of exploitation for 

five years, $156,000.00 

Production during same 

period $289,000.00 

Net proceeds in five years. . $133,000.00 

There was introduced on behalf of the 
Government of the United States the 
testimony of the expert, Mr. Donald F. 
McDonald, who previously belonged to 
the Geological Survey in Washington, 
but who was an employee of The Panama 
Canal at the time he testified. He stated 
that he had made two inspections of the 
land; that he had taken samples and 
that he had had analyses made of these 
samples. The samples selected during 
the first inspection were sent to the 
Treasury Department of the United 
States for examination by the Mint. The 
assays showed a percentage of gold from 
$0.35 to $5 per cubic yard, and from 
$0.20 to $6.80 per ton. 

This expert stated in his testimony 
in answer to questions of counsel for 
the claimant that "The claim must be 
considered mineral land; that it is 
a good place for the prospector to work, 
and that it would not be impossible for 
him to find gold in paying quantities." 
(Page 114, Transcript.) 

The first inspection covered almost 
exclusively the "Quebrada de Oro" 
section; the second included both 
sections. Stone and gravel were se- 
lected from both sections to be assayed. 
The samples selected during this second 
inspection were sent by the authorities 
of the Canal Zone to a different office 
from the first to be assayed. The figures 
of the second analysis differ widely from 
the first ranging from zero to $1 per ton. 

The expert who testified on behalf of 
the claimant stated that he had studied 
on the ground from May 2d to Octo- 
ber 15th, 1918. (Page 5, Transcript.) 
Counsel for the claimant called the Com- 
mission's attention to the fact that the 
expert who testified on behalf of the 
Government of the United States, in 
making his examinations had followed 
the course of the Quebrada for more than 
a mile; had made the study necessary 



Presenta 74 muestras tomadas de las 
diversas secciones del terreno, cuyo 
analisis demuestra una existencia de oro 
hasta $8 por yarda ciibica. 

Entra en detalles tecnicos con respecto 
al valor comercial de la mina; acerca de 
la clase de trabajos que deben empren- 
derse para su explotacion; epoca mas 
favorable para realizarlos; y despues de 
calcular los gastos, compara estos con la 
produccion, dando las siguientes cifras: 
Gastos de explotacion du- 
rante un quinquenio. . . $156,000.00 
Producto durante el mis- 
mo tiempo $289,000.00 

Beneficio liquido en un 

quinquenio $133,000.00 

El Gobierno de los Estados Unidos, por 
su parte, presenta al pcrito Mr. Donald 
F. MacDonald, que anteriormente per- 
tenecia a la Oficina de Geologia de 
Washington, y al momento de servir de 
testigo era empleado de la Zona del Canal. 
Manifesta verifico dos inspecciones 
sobre el terreno, y de las muestras se 
hicieron los analisis correspondientes. 

Remitidas las muestras de la primera 
inspeccion de orden del Departamente del 
Tesoro de los Estados Unidos, de Wash- 
ington, al negociado de la Casa de Mon- 
eda, su analisis arroja una existencia de 
oro en proporciones'entre $0.35 y $5.00 
por yarda cubica, y $0.20 y $6.80 por 
tonelada. 

Dicho perito manifesto en su declara- 
cion, contestando a preguntas del 
abogado del reclamante, "que la re- 
clamacion debe ser considerada como de 
tierra mineral; que es un lugar a propo- 
sito para que un explotador haga en el 
trabajos; y que no seria imposible que 
estos llegaran a ser remunerados." (Pag. 
114 del Tetsimonio). 

La primera inspeccion cubrio casi sola- 
mente la parte de la Quebrada de Oro; 
la segunda, abarco las dos secciones. En 
ambas se tomaron piedra y arena, para 
los analisis. 

Las muestras de esta segunda inspec- 
cion fueron remitidas por las autori- 
dades de la Zona del Canal, para su 
analisis, a distinta oficina que las pri- 
meras. Las cifras de este segundo anali- 
sis, distan mucho de las del primero, 
oscilando entre cero y $1 por tonelada. 
El perito por parte del reclamante 
participa estuvo haciendo estuidos sobre 
el terreno, desde el 2 de Mayo al 15 de 
Octubre de 1918. (Pag. 5 del Testimonio.) 
El abogado del reclamante llama la 
atencion de la Comision Mixta acerca del 
hecho de que el perito del Gobierno de 
los Estados Unidos, para el examen del 
terreno ha tenido que seguir el curso de 
la quebrada durante mas de una rnilla; 
hacer los estudios necesarios para dividir- 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



59 



to divide the mine into two sections; 
had taken 198 samples of gravel and 
44 of rock, and that he had accomplished 
all of this work in 110 hours. (Page 101, 
Transcript.) 

Counsel for the claimant estimated 
that about $15,000 had been spent by 
the "Quebrada de Oro Plantation and 
Mining Company" in working the mine. 

II. 

The Members of the Joint Commission 
have been unable to reach an agreement 
either as to the rights of the claimant or 
as to the amount of compensation. 

The Panamanian Members believe that 
the claimant in obtaining the con- 
cession fulfilled all the requirements of 
the Colombian law in force at the time 
and they are of the opinion that the 
claim is legally justified, but when they 
proceed to value the damages sustained 
by the claimant as a result of the expro- 
priation of this concession, they es- 
timate the damages in the sum of $1 5 ,000. 

The American Commissioners deny 
that the claimant has any right to 
make a claim against the United States, 
and they base their opinion on the fact 
that by Article XXI of the Treaty the 
Republic of Panama granted to the 
United States all public lands without 
encumbrance whatever, and they are 
of the opinion that inasmuch as under 
the mining laws of Colombia the State or 
Department retained ownership ot the 
mines, granting to claimant only exploita- 
tion privileges, when Panama made 
that cession to the United States, it 
made impossible any such claim against 
the latter, and the claimant, therefore, 
only has recourse against the Republic 
of Panama. 

III. 

The fact remains that the claimant 
did not succeed in operating the mine 
in question in a manner which would 
render it possible to capitalize the re- 
turns, and to correctly judge the amount 
of damages sustained on account of its 
expropriation. 

The claim has two aspects: One 
technical, with regard to the intrinsic 
value of the mine, and the other eco- 
nomical, with regard to its commercial 
value. From the evidence adduced the 
undersigned Umpire has been unable 
to appraise either the intrinsic value 
or the commercial value of the mine. 
The reports of the experts have im- 
pressed him more as a business prop- 
osition than as an estimate. Therefore, 
whether or not the mine was worked, 
until the results obtainable are known, 
the value will remain a mystery, and 
to appraise it will be impossible. 



lo en secciones; tomar 198 muestras de 
arena y 44 de roca; y que para todo ello 
empleo solamente 110 horas (Pag. 101, 
del Testimonio). 

El obogado del reclamante aprecia en 
unos $15,000 el importe de los gastos 
realizados en sus trabajos por la Que- 
brada de Oro Plantation and Mining 
Company. 

II. 

Los miembros de la Comision Mixta 
no han logrado ponerse de acuerdo ni 
sobre el derecho del reclamante ni sobre 
el importe de la remuneracion. 

Mientras que los miembros por parte 
de Panama, fundandose en que el 
reclamante, para obtener las concesiones 
por cuya expropiaci on reclama, ha 
cumplido con los requisitos exigidos por 
la ley Colombia na vigente a la sazon, 
son de opinion de que le asisten todos los 
derechos para reclamar; al proceder al 
avaluo de los perjuicios esperimentados 
por este como consecuencia de la expro- 
piacion referida, los estiman en $15,000. 

Los comisionados por parte de los 
Estados Unidos, niegan que asista al 
reclamente derecho alguno contra el 
Gobierno de los Estados Unidos, y se 
fundan en que por el Articulo XXI del 
Tratado del Canal, la Republica de 
Panama cedio al Gobierno de los Es- 
tados Unidos todos los terrenos publicos 
sin gravamen alguno, y como por las 
leyes de minas Colombianas el Estado o 
el Dcpartamcnto conservaban el derecho 
de propicdad sobre las minas, concedien- 
do solo el de explotacion, al hacer Pana- 
ma aquella cesion a los Estados Unido9 
anulo .toda posible reclamacion contra 
estos, y al reclamante solo le queda 
hacerlo contra la Republica de Panama. 

III. 

El hecho es que el reclamante no 
logro explotar la mina en cuestion de 
modo que sea posible capitalizar sus 
rendimientos y poder juzgar a punto 
cierto la monta de los perjuicios experi- 
mentados a causa de su expropiacion. 

Esta reclamacion tiene dos aspectos: 
uno tecnico, relacionado con el valor real 
de la mina; y otro economico, relacion- 
ado con el valor comercial de la misma. 

Por las pruebas aducidas, el Arbitro 
que subscribe, no ha logrado poder llegar 
a materializar ni el valor real, ni el valor 
economico, o commercial de la mina. 
Los informes periciales le han impresion- 
ado m as como un proyecto de negocio que 
como un avaluo. Por aquel se podra 
pensar en emprenderlo o no, pero mien- 
tras se desconozcan sus resultados, el 
valor continuara siendo una incognita, 
y cl avaluo se hace imposible. 



60 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



The figure of $15,000, suggested by 
the Panamanian Members, in compen- 
sation for a gold mine seems a small 
amount. And, on the other hand, 
to ask the United States to pay the sum 
of $15,000 which is the amount counsel 
for the claimant stated had been spent 
in working the mine, does not seem 
just. If the business venture was a 
failure the United States Government 
•hould not be held responsible for it. 

Therefore, and without prejudice 
to any claim which the claimant may 
make before a competent tribunal the 
Hndersigned Umpire considers that on 
account of lack of evidence which would 
prove the true intrinsic and commercial 
value of the claim of the "Quebrada de 
Oro Plantation and Alining Company," 
be should refrain, and he does hereby re- 
frain from announcing a decision in this 
case. 

Done in the National Palace, Panama, 
August 30, 1919. 

Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 



Aceptar la cifra de $15,000 sugerida 
por los miembros panamenos, para re- 
compensar la expropiacion de una mina de 
oro, le parece poca recompensa. Y, por 
otra parte, hacer pagar al Gobierno de 
los Estados Unidos la suma de $15,000 
que coincide con lo que el abogado de! 
reclamante manifest 6 habia aquel gastado 
en los trabajos de la mina, no le parece 
justo. Si el negocio no salio bien, no 
debe hacerse responsable de ello al 
Gobierno de los Estados Unidos. 

En su consecuencia, y sin prejuzgar 
el mejor derecho que el reclamante pueda 
alegar ante Tribunal competente, el 
Arbitro que subscribe considera que por 
falta de elementos que le permitan cono- 
cer el verdadero valor tecnico y comer- 
cial relacionado con la reclamacion de la 
Quebrada de Oro Plantation and Mining 
Company debe inhibirse y se inhibe' de 
pronunciar fallo acerca de la misma. 

Dado en espafiol y en ingles en e 
Palacio Nacional de Panama a los 30 
dfas del mes de Agosto de 1919. 

Manuel Walls y Merino, 

A rkitro. 



Reoccupying Family Quarters after Leave. 

Attention of employees to whom family quarters are assigned 
is called to that part of paragraph 19 of circular No. 674-24 which 
reads, "Employees will be required to notify the District Quarter- 
master at expiration of leave period, and on date they reoccupy 
quarters, of the total time absent during that period. (Hospital 
treatment excepted.)" This applies to absences of 10 days or more. 

This report may be made orally or in writing. The simple state- 
ment, "I have reoccupied my quarters in House No " is 

sufficient. 



Official Circulars. 



Acting Superintendent, Acting Master of 
Transportation, Panama Railroad. 

Panama Railroad Company, 

Office of President, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., September 2. 1919. 
Hbads of Departments and Divisions: 

Effective this date, and during the absence on 
leave of Mr. S. W. Heald, Mr. W. F. Foster will 
act as Superintendent of the Panama Railroad, 
and Mr. W. J. Bissell will act as Master of Trans- 
portation. 

Chester Hardtng, President. 



Watch Inspection. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 10, 1919. 
Circular No. 1361: 

To conductors, engineers, yardmaster, motor 
tor operators — The records kept by the official 
watch inspectors at Panama and Colon show that 
A number of our conductors and engineers are not 
complying with Circular No. 1247, issued April 24, 
1919, relative to the semi-monthly watch inspec- 
tion, and through failure to do so makes it neces- 
sary to again call your attention to the importance 
of having your watch inspected as required by 
the rules. 



It seems to have been the practice of some of 
our conductors and engineers to call at the watch 
inspector, compare time with the clock therein, 
make some remark relative to the exactness of 
their watch, walk out and take it for granted that 
they had fulfilled all the requirements necessary 
in having their watch inspected. 

Please be advised that when calling at the 
official watch inspector for the purpose of having 
your watch inspected, as per rule, it will be neces- 
sary for conductors and engineers to hand their 
watch to the official watch inspector or his repre- 
sentative for inspection, otherwise your call at 
his office will not be considered official, and no 
record will be made of same. Should there be 
the faintest shadow of a doubt in your mind at 
any time as to the person who inspects your watch 
having authority to do so, you will submit written 
report to this office and the matter will be takeD 
up with the proper authorities. 

Open hours of the inspector's office at — 

Colon: 7.30 a. m. to 7.30 p. ro., daily except 
Sundays and holidays. 

Panama: 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. daily except Satur- 
days, Sundays, and holidays. 8 a. m. to 9 
p. m. Saturdays only. 

W. J. Bisseix, 
Acting Manager of Transportation- 
Approved : 

W. F» Foster, 

Acting Superintendent. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



61 



Opening of Public Schools. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 
Division of Schools, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 9, 1919. 

To all concerned — The public schools of the 
Canal Zone will open on Wednesday, October 1, 
1919. 

All children residing in the Canal Zone, whether 
of employees or non-employees, and children of 
American employees of The Panama Canal, 
Panama Railroad, United States Army and Navy, 
and other departments of the United States 
Government residing in Panama or Colon are 
entitled to free school privileges. The children 
of employees not living in the Canal Zone and 
not citizens of the United States are not entitled 
to Canal Zone school privileges. No child will be 
admitted, however, who will not be six (6) years 
old on or before February 1 , 1920. 

Schools for white children will be opened at the 
following places: 

Balboa Grades 1 to 12, inclusive 

Ancon Grades 1 to 8, inculsive 

Pedro Miguel Grades 1 to 8, inclusive 

Gatun Grades 1 to 8, inclusive 

Cristobal (Colon Beach) Grades 1 to 12, inclusive 

The dividing line between the Ancon and Bal- 
boa school districts commences at the old nurses' 
quarters and extends to the railroad tracks, 
passing between houses Nos. 592 and 593-X. 
Grade pupils wno live in houses No. 36, 47, 569, 
570, 571, 572, 574, and 592. and on the Ancon side 
of these houses, will attend the Ancon school; 
those who live in houses Nos. 201 , 202, 576, 593 to 
604, including 593-X, and on the Balboa side of 
these houses, will attend the Balboa school. 
i Pupils who live in Corozal will attend the Bai- 
boa school. 

Pupils who live in Paraiso and on the west side 
of the Canal will attend the Pedro Miguel school. 

Grade pupils who live between Gatun and New 
Culebra will attend the Gatun school. 

Pupils living in Cristobal will take the train 
to the Washington Hotel leaving the commissary 
at 8.36 a. m., and return on the train leaving the 
Washington Hotel at 3.30 p. m. 

Pupils in all schools remaining at school during 
the noon hour will be under the supervision of a 
teacher. 

White schools will open and close according to 
the following schedule: 

A. M. P. M. 

Balboa High 8.00—11.15 12.45—3.30 

Balboa Elementary . 8 . 00—1 1 . 30 1 . 00—2 . 30 

Ancon 8.00—11.30 1.00—2.30 

Pedro Miguel 8.00—11.30 1.00—2.30 

Gatun 8.00—11.30 1.00—2.30 

Cristobal Elementary 9 .00 — 12 .00 1 .00 — 3 .00 

Cristobal High 9.00—12.00 1.00—4.00 

i Wherever practicable, the first grade in all 
white schools will dismiss 30 minutes earlier 
than the other grades, and the second grade 15 
minutes earlier, both morning and afternoon. 

Schools for colored children will open at La 
Boca. Pedro Miguel, Paraiso, Empire, Gatun, 
and Cristobal. The sessions will be from 8 to 11 
a. m. and from 1 to 3 p. m. 

The above schedules are subject to such changes 
as conditions may warrant. 

I Requests should be made to this office im- 
mediately for necessary railroad transportation. 
I Parents of pupils attending the Canal Zone 
schools for the first time should prepare the follow- 
ing information and give the slip of paper con- 
taining the same to the pupils to hand to the 
teachers on the first day of school: Pupil's name; 

flace and date of birth; date of arrival on the 
sthmus; city, or town, and State in which pupil 
attended school, if pupil has previously attended 
school; and name, check number, occupation, and 
address of parent or guardian. Pupils who have 
attended school in the States should, if possible, 
submit their report cards from such schools. 
A. R. Lang, 
Approved : Superintendent of Schools. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Acting Shop Accountant, Mechanical 
Division. 

The Panama Canal, 
Mechanical Division, 
Balboa, C. Z., September 13, 1919. 
To all concerned — Mr. A. B. Caruthers it 
appointed acting shop accountant, Mechanical 
Division, effective September 13, 1919, vie* 
Mr. J. F. Everett, on leave. 

E. G. Kintner, 
Superintendent, Mechanical Division, 



Employees with Switch Keys. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C Z„ September 8, 191*, 
Circular No. 1358: 

To all concerned — Please furnish this office as 
soon as possible with a list of all employees, with 
check number, under your jurisdiction who hare 
in their possession a switch key. 

W. J. BlSSELL, 

Acting Master of Transportation. 



Cable Notice. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 11, 1919. 
To agents and operators — The following informa- 
tion has been received from the Central and Soutb 
American Telegraph and Cable Company: 

"Communication with Costa Rica restored} 
accept at sender's risk." 

"Tegucigalpa, Honduras, reports all traffic oa 
hand for Honduras since the first at main office; 
unable forward or deliver owing revolution. Use- 
less accepting traffic for Honduras. No means o< 
delivery." 

W. J. Bissell, 
Acting Master of Transportation. 



Christmas Candies in Pails. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., September 6, 1919. 
Memorandum No 871 : 

To all concerned — We have received a few 
requests for mixed candies in pails for Christmas. 
In order that our requisition may be placed is 
sufficient time to insure the arrival of these 
candies before Christmas, I would thank you to 
advise your estimated requirements for thit 
year. 

J. J. Jackson, 
General Manager, Commissary Division. 



Misdirected Letters. 

The following insufficiently addressed mail hat 
been received in the office of the Director of 
Posts, and may be obtained upon request of the 
addressee. Request may be made by telephone, 
calling No. 182, Balboa. 
Allpass, T. F. Neimarr, T. C. 

Avett, Mrs. Nora Noben, William H. 

Blumberg, Charles Roberts, Daniel 

Brown, Arthur Salmon, Richard Homer 

Crossman, Alfred H. Smith, Mrs. F. M. 
Dougherty, Charles F. Swanson, Oscar 
Fellstrom, Arthur Watson, W. C. 

Howard, Lawrence C. Welten, Theo. 
Narronga, R. T. Yale, Chas. E. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 15, 191*. 
Barry, Mrs. Max Hall, Fitz A.* 

Caicedo, Sra. Dolores Riely, Eugene R. 
Combs, Master Walter Salaman, Alejaindre 

V., Jr. Shoberg, Charles 

Crowford, Mrs. R. S. Thorne. Capt. E. A.f 
Eberling, Alexander Yale, Charles E. 
Head, C. V. 



* Special delivery, t Parcel. 



62 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



List of the Diplomatic and Consular Corps 
Accredited to the Republic of Panama. 

September 15, 1919. 

ARGENTINA 

Panama 
Bruno Cittadini, Consul General. 
Rafael Gutieri, Acting Consul General. 

BELGIUM. 

Guatemala. 
Alberto Moulaert (resides in Guatemala), Acting 
Charge d 'Affaires. 

Panama. 

B. D. Fidanque, Consul. 

Colon. 
J. J. Hcnriquez, Vice-Consul. 

BOLIVIA. 

Panama. 
Samuel Boyd, Consul General. 

Ccion. 
Isidoro Hazera, Consul. 

BRAZIL. 

Habana, Cuba. 
Luis Guinaraes, Charge d 'Affaires. 

Panama. 
Jose Fonseca Filho, Vice-Consul. 
Jorge Domingo Arias, Consular Agent. 

CHILE. 

San Jose, Costa Rica. 
Julio Garces, Envoy Extraordinary and Min- 
ister Plenipotentiary. 

Panama. 
Francisco Echaurren Orrego, Charge d'Affaires, 

ad interim and Consul General. 
Ramon Arias F., Jr., Consular A.gent. 

CHINA. 
Panama. 
Woo Pei Kuang, Consul General. 

C. N. Chau, Vice-Consul. 

CO?TA RICA. 
Panama. 
Humberto Vaglio, Consul General. 

Colon. 
Daniel Rojas P., Consul. 

Bocas del Toro. 
Juan Rafael Mora Escalante, Consul. 

CUBA. 

Panama. 
Carlos A. Vasseur y Poo, Minister Resident. 
Jose F. Baron, Secretary of Legation. 
Antonio Mesa Plasencia, Secretary of Legation. 

Colon. 
Jose Dominguez Romay, Consul. 

DENMARK. 

Panama. 
J. L. Maduro, Consul. 

Colon. 
J. V. Beverhoudt, Vice-Consul. 

ECUADOR. 

Panama. 
Modesto Rivadeneyra, Consul. 

FRANCE. 

Panama. 
J. P. E. Bizel, Charge d'Affaires. 
Maurice de Simoni n, Charge d 'Affaires, ad interim. 

Colon. 
Gustave de Laigue (resides in Panama City), 

Chancellor. (Attache.) 
M. Marcel, Vice-Consul. 

David. 
Eugene Loeffler, Vice-Consul. 

GREAT ERITAIN. 

Panama. 
Andrew Percy Bennett, Envoy Extraordinary 

and Minister Plenipotentiary. 
Charles F. Madeley, Vice-Consul. 
E. S. Humber, Proconsul. 

Colon. 
J. R. Murray, Consul. 
George Goodall, Vice-Consul. 
Frederick Woodcock, Proconsul. 
Bocas del Toro. 
William H. Ponton, Consul. 



David. 
William C. Kincaid, Consular Agent. 

GREECE. 
Panama. 
Florencio Arosemena Ycaza, Consul. 

GUATEMALA. 

Panama. 
J. F. Arango, Consul General. 

Colon. 
Vicente Delgado, Consul. 

HAITI. 

Colon. 
Hilario V. Seixas, Consul General. 

HOLLAND. 

Panama. 
David M. Sasso, Consul General. 

Colon. 
J. J. Ecker, Consul. 

HONDURAS. 

Panama. 
Marcos E. Velasquez, Consul General. 

ITALY. 

Panama. 
Carlo Raguzzi, Charge d'Affaires and Consul 

Colon. 
Miguel Papio, Consular Agent. 

JAPAN". 

Panama. 
Tadanao Imai, Vice-Consul. 

MEXICO. 

Panama. 
Vicente Rendon Quijano, Consul. 
Baldomero Mendez, Vice-Consul. 

Colon. 
Inocencio Galindo, Vice-Consul. 

THE NETHERLANDS. 

See HOLLAND. 

NICARAGUA. 

Panama. 
Marcos £. Velasquez, Charge d'Affaires. 

Bocas del Toro. 
Salomon H. Conoan, Consul. 

NORWAY. 

Mexico City. 
Michael Strom Lie, Consul G-eneral. 

Panama. 
C. D. Corinaldi, Vice-Consul. 

Colon. 
Oswald Montagn Grimsey, Consul. 
Nicolas Bergh, Vice-Consul. 

PARAGUAY. 

Panama. 
Juan Brin, Consul General. 

PERU. 

Panama. 
Oscar Barrenechea y Raygada, Charge d'Affaires. 
Alberto B. de Obarrio, Consular Agent. 

Colon 
Enrique Vallarino, Consul . 

PORTUGAL. 

Caracas. 

Fernao Botto Machado, Envoy Extraordinary 

and Minister Plenipotentiary. 

Colon. 

Ruben S. Arcia, Consul. 

Ofilio Hazera, (resides in Panama), Vice-ConauL 

Bocas del Toro. 
E. C. McFarland, Vice-Consul. 

SALVADOR. 

Panama. 
Ernesto A. Boyd, Consul General. 

SANTO DOMINGO. 

Colon. 
Jos6 M. Fidanque, Vice-Consul. 

SPAIN. 

Panama. 
Jos6 Albinana, Acting Charge d'Affaires and 

Consul. 
Luis San Simon y Ortega, Vice-Consul. 

Colon. 
Antonio Andrade Polanco, ConsuL 

David. 
Pedro del Rio, Consular Agent. 

Santiago de Veraguos. 
Julio Garcia Sierra, Vice-Consul. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



63 



SWEDEN. 

Panama. 
B. Malo, Consul. 

Colon. 
J. J. Ecker, Vice-Consul. 

SWITZERLAND. 
Panama. 
Jos£ Misteli, Consul. 

UNITED STATES. 

Panama. 
Win. Jennings Price, Envoy Extraordinary and 

Minister Plenipotentiary. 
Clarence B. Hewes, Secretary of the Legation. 
H. B. Crosby, Military Attache. 
Alban G. Snyder, Consul General. 

Colon. 
Jultus D. Dreher, Consul. 
Theodore M. Fisher, Vice-Consul. 

Bocas del Toro. 
William J. Burke, Consular Agent. 

VENEZUELA. 

Panama. 
Virgilio Capriles, Vice-Consul. 

Colon. 
Isaias Garbiras, Consul General. 



August Rainfall for Three Years. 



Shipping Commissioner's Sale. 

The Acting Shipping Commissioner, room 305, 
Administration Building, Balboa Heights, Canal 
Zone, will accept written bids up to noon, Satur- 
day 20, 1919, for the purchase of the personal 
effects belonging to the estate of A. Cunningham, 
deceased American seaman. The property to be 
sold is listed below and bids may be made for the 
entire lot of the effects or be limited to individual 
articles. 

Prospective bidders desiring to examine the 
effects should apply to the Acting Shipping Com- 
missioner's office on any business day. Bids should 
be submitted in sealed envelopes, addressed to 
the Acting Shipping Commissioner, marked "Bid 
on effects of A. Cunningham, deceased." The 
right is reserved to reject any or all bids. 

One sea bag, 2 hats, 1 coat, 1 trousers, 1 pipe 
and case. 1 safety razor. 

J. A. Mitchell, 
Acting Shipping Commissioner. 



Rainfall from August 1 to 31, 1919, Inclusive. 



Stations. 


.9 

I & 


Q 


i 

o 


Pacific tectum — 
Taboga 


Ins. 
4.10 
1.10 
1.14 
.84 
1.30 
2.24 

2.04 
1.45 
1.59 
1.04 

2 65 
1.40 
1.92 
1.60 
1.19 
3.08 

3 45 
2.36 
2 10 
2 94 

4.78 


7 
13 
9 
7 
31 
10 

11 
27 
10 
16 
16 
24 
30 
31 
28 
31 

21 
31 
31 
17 
14 


Ins. 
6.79 




5.96 




5.82 




4.02 




7.61 




9.95 


Central section — 


8.58 




8.63 




8.49 




7.37 




9.32 


*E1 Vigia 


8.11 

7.82 


*Darien 

"Trinidad 


10 27 
6 78 




10.17 


Atlantic section — 


9 07 




11 10 




6.77 




17.54 


♦Porto Bello 


17.76 



Stations. 



Pacific section — 

Balboa 

Balboa Heights 

Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel . . 

Rio Grande 

Central section — 

Culebra 

Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

Juan Mina. . . . 

Alhajuela 

Vigia 

Frijoles 

Trinidad 

Monte Lirio . . . 
Atlantic section- 

Gatun 

Brazos Brook. . 

Colon 



1919 



5.96 
5.82 
4.02 
7.61 
9.95 

8.58 
8.63 
8.49 
7.37 
9.32 
8.11 
7.82 

10.19 
6.78 

10.17 

9.07 
11.10 
6.77 



1918 



3.75 
3.84 
5.70 
4.41 
5.52 

4.91 
6.81 
5.18 
8.59 

11.36 
9.16 

10.25 
8.91 
5.81 

11.82 

17.95 
19.20 

18.85 



1917 



6.27 
7.42 
9.45 
9.51 
10.28 

9.97 
9.95 
8.76 
12.62 
15.30 
13.32 
15.71 
9.71 
10.35 
12.83 

17.81 
19.71 
15.79 



7.54 
7.72 
8.16 
8.26 
9.44 

10.00 
9.43 
9.12 
11.77 
11.63 
12.30 
12.23 
10.26 
10.20 
11 73 

13.99 
14.45 
14.83 



2. 

21 

25 
22 

27 
20 
25 
L'ti 
22 
J ! > 
22 

26 

2fi 

23 

26 
22 



* Standard rain gauge — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gauge at unstarred stations — values, 
midnight to midnight. 
{Standard rain gauge — readings at 8 a. m. daily. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Pipes, ea $0 

Pipes, ea 

Pulleys for sewing machine motor, ea 

Saws, panel, 12-point, Disston, 22", ea. . . 2 
Saws, compass No. 4, Disston, 12", ea. . . . 

Shades, Vuder, porch, 6', ea 5 

Shades, Vuder, porch, 8', ea 6 

Spoons : 

Tea, tinned, ea 

Table, tinned, ea 

Dictionary, Standard, Comprehensive, 
Funk and Wagnall's, ea 1 

Cambric, linen, 36", yd 1 

Camisoles, satin, assorted colors, plain or 

trimmed, ea 1 

Collars: 
Soft, Wellsford, ea 

Soft, Cavalier, ea 

Soft, Oakmont, ea 

Dress goods: 

Cotton, fancy, white goods, yd 

Cotton, fancy, white goods, yd 

Cotton, white, fancy pique, yd 

Cotton, fancy, white goods, yd 

Dimity, fancy, white goods, yd 

Organdie, 40", yd 

Satin, fancy, yd '. 

Suiting, Carolina, yd 

Swiss, yd 

Swiss, yd 

Swiss, colored, yd 

Voile, yd 

Voile, white pattern, 39", yd 

Voile, white pattern, 39", yd 

Voile, white pattern, 39", yd 

Voile, white pattern, 39", yd 

Voile, fancy, yd 

Hose, ladies', summer weight, full fasnion- 

ed. blacK, pr 

KnickerbocKers, boy's, beach cloth, pr. . . . 
Linen: 

Sheer, 36", yd 

Sheer, 36", yd 1 

Napkins, 18" x 18", ea 

Pajamas, men's, assorted, striped percale, 

suit 1 

Pins, hump, hair, 20s, pkg 

Shirts, negligee, boy's coat style, collar 

band, soft cuffs, assorted patterns: 

Colored. Madras striped, ea 1 

White pongette, ea 1 

Soap, erasive, Palmer's, cake 



64 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Beverage. 

Orange has been added to the list of flavors of soda water manufactured by the 
Commissary Division. 

Toys. 

All commissaries are selling Rollomobiles, at $2.75. These popular toys are buDt 
to withstand the abuse which healthy children may be expected to give them. 

Electric Sewing Machines. 

No. 1 portable sewing machines, recently arrived, are now offered at all commis- 
saries at $34.75. 

Baskets. 

Baskets, of various sizes and shapes, comprising waste paper, market, work, 
flower, and fruit baskets from Jamaica, are unusual values at the prices asked. They 
are much in request among commissary customers. 

Zweibach. 

A fine grade of zweibach is now being made by the commissary bakery and can 
be obtained at line stores, fresh, daily. The price of 10 cents per package is low in 
comparison with that of the imported product. 

Electric Irons. 

A number of customers will be glad to learn that a shipment of 6-pound electric 
irons has been received by recent arrival from the United States and may be obtained 
at all line stores, at $4.95. 

Auto Supplies. 

A shipment of auto supplies has recently been received and is on sale at Cristobal, 
Gatun, and Balboa commissaries this week. Lock washers, hand horns, outside 
blow-out patches, reliners, pumps, Black-Lac, tires and inner tubes, are some of the 
items. 

Books. 

Books received : 

"The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse," and "Mare Nostrum," by Blasco Ibafiez (11 6th edition); 
"What Happened to Europe," by Frank Vanderlip; "The Undying Fire," by H. G. Wells; "Shopa 
and Houses," "The Happy Family," "Nocturne," "The Chaste Wife," and "On the Staircase," by 
Frank Swinnerton. ^^^^ 

Kerosene Oil. 

Kerosene is now sold in any quantity, and not merely in 5-gallon tins, as formerly. 
Kerosene tanks with pump outfits, which permit such sales, have been placed in 
operation at the commissaries in Ancon, Ancon Market, Balboa, La Boca, Pedro 
Miguel, Red Tank, Gatun, Camp Bierd and Cristobal. These tanks are of concrete 
and are located outside of the commissary buildings. Yearly sales of kerosene through 
the commissaries amount approximately to 250,000 gallons. So that kerosene might 
be sold with less trouble to customers, and with less work to the Commissary Division, 
requisition for the 9 tanks and pumps was placed in July, 1918. The outfits were 
received and installation was handled by the Building Division. 

Delivery Delay. 

Typical of conditions now existing in many lines is the following letter from a 
manufacturer in the United States, with whom the Commissary Purchasing Agent 
placed awards for certain items of hardware: 

"We -quite agree with you that 90 days seems an unreasonable period in which 
to execute an order, especially as in the r a st we have been able to give you prompt 
delivery, but brieflv the explanation is this: The trade generally, has held off buy- 
ing in the firm conviction that prices would come down. Now with the shelves 
empty and facing no lower prices they have simply swamped us with business. 
These orders are from our old time customers both at home and abroad and we 
are under obligations to all. We are simply doing the best we can and if we can 
ship your order earlier than 90 days we assure you we will do so." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, 81.00 per year; foreign, $1.50: address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 24, 1919. No. 6. 



Purchases by Vessels from Canal Commissary Division. 

Two thousand two hundred forty-six dollars and five cents was the 
average of the daily purchases by commercial steamships of commis- 
sary supplies from The Panama Canal during the last fiscal year. The 
total of their purchases for the year was $819,808.17, which is slightly 
over $68,300 per month. The total was made up of $761,746.16 
for miscellaneous groceries and cold storage; $25,067.37 for coffee, 
$21,192.21 for bakery products, and $11,802.43 for ice. In addition, 
the Commissary Division rendered laundry service for the commer- 
cial ships valued at $19,123.62, averaging $1,593.63 per month. 

Sales to vessels of the United States Navy are accounted for with 
other sales to the United States Government. The latter amounted to 
$2,395,162.73 during the year. It is estimated that one-fourth of these 
sales were to ships of the Navy, purchases by which would accordingly 
approximate $600,000 a year. Including the estimated sales to Naval 
vessels, the value of the purchases by vessels during the year averaged 
approximately $118,000 a month. 

Ship's Chandlery. 

The General Storekeeper at Balboa has completed an investigation 
of the extent to which the range of standard snip's chandlery kept in 
stock on the Isthmus might be extended, and reports that as a whole 
the steamship operators, masters, and agents are very well satisfied 
with the stock now handled by The Panama Canal. 

Suggestions along this line are always welcome and will be given due 
consideration. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending September 20, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Line or charterer. 



Arrived. 



Departed. 



Cargo — 



Discharged Laded 



Balboa 

Middlebury 

Namecki 

Nortonian 

Urubamba 

Huasco 

Saint Louis 

Acajutla 

Puerto Rico 

Jamaica 

Abangarcz 

Manuel Calvo 

Panama 

Tivives 

Imperial 

Atenas 

C.A.Canfield.... 

Metapan 

Logician 

Lake Hurst 

Middleburv 

Buford 

Manavi 

San Jose 

Gen. O. H. Ernst 



Terminal Shipping Agency 

Panama Railroad Commissary. . . . 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 

Leyland Steamship Line 

Peruvian Steamship Line 

United Fruit Company 

Compagnie Gen. Transatlantique. . 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Compagnie Gen. Transatlantique. . 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United Fruit Company 

Spanish Steamship Line 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

Anglo-American S. S. Agency 

United Fruit Comoany 

Leyland Steamship Line 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 
Panama Railroad Commissary. 

United States Government 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Mail Steamship Line. 
Panama Railroad Steamship 1 ine. 



September 15 
September 15 
September 15 
September 16 
September 10 



September 17. 
September 17. 
September 18. 
September 18. 
September 19. 
September 19. 
September 19. 
September 19 



September 14 . 
September 14. 
September 15. 
September 15. 
September 10. 
September 16. 
September 16. 
September 18. 
September 19. 
September 20. 
September 16. 
September 17. 
September 18. 
September 18 . 



Tons. 



1,096 
42 

768 
36 

388 



September 18. 
September 19 
September 20 



September 20 
September 20 
September 20 



September 20 



869 

1,439 

li 

3,148 

1,077 

546 
2,595 

550 



Torn. 
205 
17 
(*) 

3 ,870 i 
289 
1,3351 
4,735* 
736 
i 
902 
22 
98 1 
3,568 1 
13! 



(*) 



1 



89 



678 
1.0194 

1.839 



433 



*Nn cargo laded. 



66 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
frorn Port of Balboa for Week Ending September 20, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 


Balboa 




September 14. 
September 14 . 
September 15. 

September 17. 
September 18. 




Tojis. 


Tom. 
34 




United States Government 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 


September 17. 
September 15. 


12,114 
1 




Jamaica 




Kronprinzessan 


2 




Pacific Mail Steamship Co 

United States Shipping Board 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 


September 20 . 


116 

578 

1 

35 




West Chatala 




Manavi 


September 20 . 


September 20 . 






2 


Jamaica 


September 20. 


September 20. 


37 



October Weather Probabilities. 

During the month of October, 1919, the following weather con- 
ditions may be expected at the Canal entrances. Predictions are 
based on the records at Colon and Balboa Heights for the past 12 
and 13 years, respectively: 

Winds — Light, variable winds will prevail over the Atlantic coast with an average 
hourly velocity of about seven miles. The prevailing direction of the wind is 
usually from the southeast, although a considerable percentage of west and north- 
west winds_ may be expected during the month. A maximum velocity of from 
30 to 38 miles an hour may be expected during the passage of local rain or thun- 
der squalls. 

Over the Pacific coast and the interior, light northwest winds will prevail with 
an hourly velocity of about 6 miles. Here, too, during occasional rain or thunder 
squalls, the maximum velocity of the wind may exceed 30 miles an hour, but these 
wind storms are invariably of short duration. 

Rain — The average October rainfall at the Atlantic entrance of the Canal is 
14.89 inches, and on the Pacific side 10.25 inches, these averages being for periods 
of 49 and 22 years, respectively. About 25 days with rain may be expected on 
the Atlantic coast, and 22 on the Pacific coast, while the average numler of days 
with heavy rain (1.00 inch or more) has been 6 at the Atlantic entrance and 3 
at the Pacific. Throughout the length of the Canal, the greatest part of the rain- 
fall occurs during the daytime, the heaviest rainfall generally occurring between 
the hours of 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. However, at this season of the year, the percentage 
of daytime rain fall is higher over the interior and Pacific coast than over the 
Atlantic coast, and heavy rainfall may be expected on the Atlantic side during the 
early morning hours. Over both coasts the time of least rainfall is from 8 to 
9 a. m. 

Fogs — No fogs are likely to occur at either Canal entrance, but night and early 
morning fogs will be numerous over the interior. About 25 nights with fog may 
be expected over the Gaillard Cut section of the Canal, but as all fogs lift or 
become dissipated before 8.30 a.m., they should not prove a hindrance to navi- 
gation. 

Temperature — The average shade air temperature will be about 79° Fahrenheit 
on both coasts. On the Atlantic coast the temperature is not likely to rise above 
90° F., or fall lower than 70° F., while on the Pacific side the maximum tempera- 
ture may be as high as 94° F. and the minimum as low as 68° F. The mean daily 
range of temperature will be about 10° F. on the Atlantic coast and 14° F. on the 
Pacific coast. 

Barometric pressure — The average sea-level atmospheric pressure will be approxi- 
mately 29.85 inches over both coasts. The maximum pressure for the month is not 
likely to exceed 29.95 inches, or the minimum to be lower than 29.70 inches. 

Relative humidity — The humidity of the atmosphere should average about 87 
per cent over both coasts. The daily range in humidity is greater on the Pacific 
coast than on the Atlantic side, the average night-time humidity being higher and 
the midday humidity lower than on the Atlantic side. The figures for years of 
record are 94 and 74 on the Pacific side and 92 and 78 on the Atlantic. 

Storms — The Isthmus is seldom visited by violent or widespread atmospheric 
disturbances although rain, wind, or thunder storms of more or less limited ex- 
tent are of common occurrence, and may be expected quite frequently during the 
month. Rough weather may be experienced occasionally to the northward of the 
Atlantic entrance, as this is the season of the West Indian hurricane. The path 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



67 



of these storms lies well to the northward of the Isthmus, but a rough sea accom- 
panied by brisk winds may be expected outside the breakwaters, following the 
passage of one of those storms. Generally cloudy weather will continue over both 
coasts, and smooth seas are usually experienced at the Pacific entrance during 
the month of October. 

Tides — Tidal fluctuations on the Atlantic side do not affect navigation as the 
extreme tidal range at Colon is but approximately two feet. 

Panama (Balboa) tide predictions lor the month are presented in the following 
table: 



Day of- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day cf- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Height of 
and Low Water 


High 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 




W 


I 


1:49 
3.8 


7:37 
13.4 


2:16 8:08 
3.6 12.7 


s 


12 


5:13 
17.9 


11:37 
-1.4 


5:44 11:58 
17.2 -0.5 


Th 


23 


3:10 
15.2 


9:33 
1.4 


3:35 
14.9 


9:47 
1.9 


Th 


1 


2:37 
4.6 


8:18 
12.6 


3:10 9:00 
4.4 12.1 


M 


I.; 


6:01 
17.6 


12:23 
-1.0 


6:31 
16.8 


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24 


3:47 
15.4 


10:09 
1.0 


4:13 
15.0 


10:23 
1.7 


F 


3 


3:36 
5.2 


9:12 
11.9 


4:13 10:03 
4.9 11.7 


Tu 


14 


0:45 
0.2 


6:50 
16 9 


1:11 7:22 
-0.1 16.1 


S 


25 


4-23 
15.5 


10:44 
0.8 


4:48 
15.1 


10:59 
1.8 


S 


4 


4:46 
5.4 


10:26 
11.7 


5:23 11:20 
4.9 12.0 


VV 


15 


1:37 

1.3 


7:42 
15.9 


2:04 8:16 
1.0 15.2 


s 


26 


4:57 
15 4 


11:16 
0.9 


5:24 
15.0 


11:33 
2.0 


s 


5 


5 :58 
5 


11:49 
12.0 


6:30 
4.4 


Th 


16 


2:36 

2.4 


8:37 
14.8 


3:05 9:16 
2.2 14.2 


M 


1~ 


5:31 
15.1 


11 :53 
1.3 


5:58 
14.7 




M 


6 


:28 
12.8 


7:02 
4 1 


12:57 7:29 
12.9 3.5 


F 


I? 


3:42 
3.3 


9:43 
13.7 


4:13 10:27 
3.1 13.6 


Tu 


28 


0:08 
2.4 


6:03 
14.7 


12:29 
1.8 


6:33 
14.3 


Tu 


7 


1:23 
13.9 


7:57 
2 8 


1:50 8:20 
14.0 2.3 


S 


18 


4:55 
3.S 


10:59 
13.1 


5:24 11:42 
3.6 13.5 


VV 


29 


0:45 
3.0 


6:37 
14.2 


1:06 
2.5 


7:08 
13.8 


W 


8 


2:12 
15.2 


8-45 
1.4 


2:40 9:06 
15 .2 1 .1 


s 


19 


6:08 12:16 
3.7 13.2 


6:32 
3.6 


Th 


33 


1 :25 
3.6 


7:12 
13.6 


1:48 
3.2 


7:47 
13.4 


Th 


9 


2:56 
16.3 


9:30 

0.2 


3:24 9:50 
16.1 0.2 


M 


20 


0:50 
13.9 


7:13 
3.3 


1:20 7:34 
13.6 3.3 


F 


3i 


2:11 
4.2 


7:52 
13.1 


2:36 
3.9 


8:33 
13.0 


F 


IO 


3:41 
17.2 


10:12 
-0.8 


4:09 10:32 
16.9 -0.5 


Tu 


21 


1:45 
14.4 


8:07 
2.7 


2:12 8:25 
14.0 2.8 














S 


ii 


4:26 
17.8 


10:55 
-1.4 


4:57 11:14 
17.8 -0.7 


VV 


22 


2:30 
14.8 


8:53 
2 


2:56 9:08 
14.5 2.3 















The tides are placed in the order of their occurrence; the times of high and low tides are shown on 
the upper lines. The figures in boldfaced type are hours and elevations between noon and midnight; 
ante meridian figures are given in the ordinary lightfaced type. The time is Cosmopolitan Standard 
for the meridian 75° W. 

The ettvntions of the water are shown on the second line for each day; a comparison of consecutive 
heights will indicate whether it is high or low water. Heights are reckoned from mean low water 
springs, which is 8.3 below mean sea level and is the datum ol soundings on the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey cnarts for this region. The depth of water may accordingly be estimated by adding the tabu- 
lar height of the tide to the soundings, unless a minus (-) sign is before the height, in which case it 
is to be subtracted. The annual inequality or variation in the mean sea level is included in the 
predictions. 

Work on Ex-German Ships Drawing to Completion. 

Following the receipt of the two main engine cylinders for the for- 
mer German steamship A nubis, renamed Paita, from the United States 
in August and of other replacement items during September, after 
delay occasioned by strikes in the United States, work on the completion 
of the vessel has been pushed, and it is expected that it will be ready 
to turn over to the Shipping Board about the end of the month. 

The Paita is the last of five ships towed from Callao and given a 
complete overhauling, amounting to a partial rebuilding, at Balboa 
shops. The others were, in the order of completion, the Callao, Eten, 
Pisco, and Salaverry. Their aggregate gross tonnage is 32,841 tons. 
The first of the ships left Callao on September 6, 1918, and left the 
Isthmus for New York, after overhauling, on April 8, 1919. 

Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," or "The Panama 
Canal, Washington. D. C." 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama"; in the 
United States, "Pancanal, Washington."' 



68 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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69 



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70 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Corrected Figures for Tonnage of Ships through the Canal in July. 

In the report of the Governor to the Secretary of War for the 
month of July, 1919, published in The Panama Canal Record of 
September 10, some of the figures for tonnage of commercial ships 
were in error, due to mistakes in tabulation. The following are the 
corrected figures for the 158 commercial ships: 



Item. 


Cristobal. 


Balboa. 


Total. 




223 ,490 
194,185 
291 ,708 
186,433 


287,318 
247,633 
380,380 
244 .086 


510,808 




441,818 




672,088 




430,519 



The same errors require the correction of the tables of tonnages by 
nationalities which are presented below as revised : 



Item. 


Cristobal. 


Balboa. 


Total. 


Panama Canal net tonnage of commercial ships through the Canal: 

British 


131,859 
5,570 


96,899 
5,570 
3,479 
3,934 

18,477 
5,042 
8,220 


228,758 




11,140 




3,479 






3,934 




18,185 


36,662 




5,042 




5,005 

53 

3,909 


13,225 




53 






3,900 




2,467 
143,230 


2,467 




68,918 


202,148 






Total 


223,490 

115,387 
3,540 


287,318 

83,089 
3,540 
2,823 
3,840 

16,095 
4,438 
5,803 


510,808 


United States equivalent net tonnage of commercial Bhips, through the 
Canal: 


198,476 




7,080 




2,823 






3,840 




15,926 


32 021 




4,438 




3,351 

53 

2,380 


0,154 




53 






2,380 




2,224 
125,781 


2,224 


United States 


53,548 


179,329 






Total 


194,185 

170,639 
6,367 


247,633 

127,303 
6,367 
4,395 
4,729 
24,116 
6,987 
12,677 


441,818 


Registered gross tonnage of commercial ships through the Canal: 

British 


297,942 




12,734 




4,395 






4,729 




23,652 


47,768 




6,987 




7,922 

69 

3,805 


20,599 




69 






3,805 




3,370 
190,436 


3,370 




79,254 


269,690 






Total 


291,708 

108,049 
3,889 


380,380 

81,890 
3,889 
2,795 
3,834 

14,855 
4,422 
7,014 


672,088 


Registered net tonnage of commercial ships, through the Canal: 


189,939 




7,778 




2,795 






3,834 




15,183 


30,038 




4,422 




3,941 

53 

2,833 


10,955 




53 




2,174 
123,213 


2,833 




2,174 




52,485 


175,698 






Total 


186,433 


244,0*6 


430,519 



Commissaries Closed on Account of Quarterly Inventory. 

Commissaries will be closed for quarterly inventory all day on Tues- 
day, September 30. The grocery and cold storage sections will be 
opened not later than 10 a. m. on Wednesday, October 1, and other 
departments as soon as the check by the Auditor's representatives has 
been completed. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 71 

Witnessing Pay Receipts. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 20, 1919. 
To all concerned — My attention has been called to the fact that it is a 
not uncommon occurrence for undelivered pay receipts to be returned 
to the Bureau of Payrolls, bearing the signature of a witness without 
such pay receipt having been signed by the payee. 

The practice of witnessing pay receipts in advance of signature by 
payee is contrary to instructions heretofore issued. It is impossible 
for a person to witness a signature before that signature is written, and 
this practice is strictly prohibited. Timekeepers or foremen violating 
this rule in the future will be subject to discipline. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor, The Panama Canal. 
President, Panama Railroad Co. 



Riprapping to Protect Bases of Range Light Towers. 

The Lighthouse Subdivision is completing the work of protecting 
four of the range light towers in Gatun Lake from erosion due to wave 
action. This has included the placing of concrete blocks around the 
bases. On one of them, tower No. 19, nearly two hundred cubes, 
two feet on the side, were used for riprapping, and since then erosion 
has been practically stopped. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations lor positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal postofhces and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service 
Board, Balboa Heights (telephone 286): 

Field superintendent of insect control (male); $1,800 to $2,400 a year; No. 453-amended; October 
14, 1919. 

The United States Civil Service Commission announces that the date of the open competitive exam- 
ination for field superintendent of insect control (announcement No. 4.S3), for men only, to fill vacan- 
cies in the Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agriculture, is October 14, 1919, instead of October 
4 as stated at the head of the original announcement. 

Assistant in marketing dairy products, Grade 1; SI, 800 to $2,400; No. 324. 

Inspector of dairy products; SI, 800 to $2,400; No. 570. 

Assistant in transportation, Grade 1; $1,800 to $2,700; No. 596. 

The United States Civil Service Commission states that as sufficient eligibles to meet the needs of 
the service have been obtained from the open competitive nonassembled continuous examinations 
listed above, until further notice no applications for these examinations will be accepted unless filed 
with the Commission at Washington, D. C, prior to the hour of closing business on September 23, 
1919. 

Glass blower, (male); Bureau of Standards; $1,200 to $1,860 a year; No. 466; October 28, 1919; 
form 1312; age, 20 years but not 46 years.* 

Artist (male);Sl.800ayear; No. 465; October 14, 1919; form 1312; age, not under 20 years.* 

Medical interne (Saint Elizabeth's Hospital) (male and female); $1,200 a year; No. 460; October 
22, November 19, and December 10, 1919; form 1312; a",e, 20 years or over. 

Agriculturist in charge of demonstrations on reclamation projects (male); $3,500 a year; No. 454; 
October 14, 1919; form2118; age. 25 veais orover.* 

Glass blower (male); Bureau of Standards; $1,200 to $1,860 a year; No. 466; October" 28, 1919; 
form 1312; age, 2C to 45 years inclusive.* 

Surveillance inspector (male); Ordnance Department at large; $1,600 to $2,400 a year; October 21, 
1919; form 1312; age. at least 21 years.* 

Assistant mechanical engineer (Bureau of Mines) (male) ; $1,500 to $1,680 a year; No. 360-amended; 
October 14. 1919; form 131?; a.e, ary.* 

Chief of division for scientific research, $3,500 to $4,500 a year; cnief of division for educational re- 
search and development, S3. 500 to $4,500 a year; educational assistant, $2, SCO to $3,600 a year; chief 
of division of relations with states, S3, 500 to $4,500 a year; chief of division of records, information, 
and planning, $3,500 to S4.500 a year; supervising assistant and inspector, $2,800 to $3,600 a year; 
field agent, SI. 800 to S3. 000 a year imale and female); November 4, 1919; form 2118; age, no limit.* 

Aeronautic engineer (Bureau of Construction and Repair, Navy Department) (male); Grade 1, 
S5.20 to $8.80 per diem; Grade 2, $9.20 per diem and above; October 28, 1919; form 1312; age, 20 
years or over.* 



* Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 



72 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Almost Whole Cargo of Fruit from California. 

The motorship Kronprinzessan Mar gar eta, passing through the Canal 
on September 17, carried almost a whole cargo of canned fruits from 
San Francisco to Swedish ports and Helsingfors. Finland. The cargo 
of 1,396 tons included 94 tons of coffee lor Gothenburg and 1,302 
tons of fruit, of which 99 tons were for Helsingfors, 523 tons for 
Stockholm, 283 tons for Malmo, and 397 tons for Gothenburg. 

Deceased and Insane Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased cr insane employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama 
Railroad Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any 
information which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, 
postal savings or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at 
the office of the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as 
possible. All claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having 
a seal, and submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 

DECEASED. 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by- 


Date of death. 


Wm. Cumberbatch — 


23996 
33493 
26980 

51993 

41545 
32745 
28141 
41211 
25686 


Barbados 

Trinidad 

Guadeloupe 

Guadeloupe 

Colombia 

Jamaica 

Panama 

Barbados 


Red Tank 

Panama 




August 29, 1919. 


Wm. Dowers (Downs) 


Commissary Division.. 
Mechanical Division . . . 

Sanitary Department.. . 

Municipal Eng. Div.. . . 
Commissary Division.. . 
Municipal Eng. Div.. . . 
Commissary Division.. . 
Mechanical Division. . . 


August 30, 1919. 
August 21, 1919. 

August 22, 1919. 

September 1, 1919. 
August 24, 1919. 


Leonard Lindsay {alias 


Panama 


Jose Anastario (alias 
Eeuben Berry 


Elijah Manning 

Juan Isabel Vega 
Augustus Pilgrim 


Cativa. R. P.... 

Panama 

La Boca 


August 24, 1319. 
September 8, 1919. 
September 11, 1919. 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of 

commitment. 


Guy K. Rounsevell . . . 


890 
22149 


United States. . . 


Aneon 

Paraiso 

S. S. Cuhbra 


Accounting Dept 

Supply Department. . 


September 5, 1919. 
August 5, 1919. 
September 5. 1919. 

















Official Circulars. 



Unserviceable Rubber Stamps. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 22, 1919. 
To all concerned — It is respectfu'ly requested 
that all unserviceable rubber stamps in the vari- 
ous offices of The Panama Canai and Panama 
Railroad Company, be forwarded to The Panama 
Canal Press, Mount Hope, where they can be 
utilized to good advantage, 

R. K. Morris, 
Chief Quartermaster. 



evenings from Paraiso will arrange to make 3 
stops in Panama yard instead of 2 as heretofore. 
First stop to be made with head and about oppo- 
site No. 8's engine, then pull down an equal num- 
ber of car lengths in making the other 2 stops. 
This to permit passengers detraining to pass 
from Panama yard to main thoroughfare north of 
No. 8's engine and avoid laborers climbing over 
coaches. 

This cancels all previous instructions issued 
relative to stopping Panama-Paraiso labor 
train in Panama yard. 

W. J. BlSSELL, 

Acting Master of Transportation. 



Stops of Panama-Paraiso Labor Train in 
Panama Yard. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 17, 1919. 
Circular No. 1371 : 

To conductors and engineers, P. R. R. — In view 
of the fact that Panama-Paraiso labor train con- 
sists of 21 cars, crew handling this labor train 



Sale of Tug "Chame." 

Sealed bids will be received in the office of the 
Chief Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, Balboa 
Heights, Canal Zone, up to 10.30 a. m., October 
23, 1919, and then opened, for the purchase of the 
tug Chame. Detailed information and form of 
prooosal may be had upon application to the office 
of the Chief Quartermaster. The Panama Canal 
reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Toys. 

California coasters, ordered for Christmas, are unobtainable, as the contractors 
advise that their factory has accepted orders beyond capacity for this year on these 
toys. 

Shoes. 

The shoe sale held at Cristobal and Balboa commissaries recently was well attended 
$2,100 worth being sold the first day. Not only was most of the bargain stock dis- 
posed of, but business was stimulated on other lines of shoes as well. 





THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, SI. 00 per year; foreign, S1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as fecond-elass matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October i, 1919. No. 7, 

CANAL WORK IN AUGUST. 

The following is the report of the Governor to the Secretary of 
War, of Canal work in the month of August, 1919: 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 23, 1919. 
The Honorable, the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of The Panama Canal for 
the month of August, 1919: 

CANAL TRAFFIC. 

The number of ocean-going commercial vessels passing through the Canal for 
the month was 188, exclusive of 34 United States Government vessels, as follows: 
Two battleships, 3 cruisers, 3 colliers, 6 supply ships, 9 destroyers, 1 submarine, 1 
submarine tender, 1 mineplanter, 2 minesweepers, 1 tug with target, and 2 subchasers 
of the Navy; and 1 transport and 2 tugs of the Army. The total number of ocean- 
going vessels was 222, in addition to which 1 launch went from Atlantic to Pacific. 

Classifications of the traffic are shown in the following tabulations. The net ton- 
nage of the 188 commercial ships aggregated 586,111 tons, Panama Canal measure- 
ment. Their registered gross tonnage was 757,843 tons, and their registered net ton- 
nage 487,811 tons. The cargo carried totaled 715,724 tons of 2,240 pounds, and ex- 
ceeded that handled during any month since May, 1918, when 780,041 tons went 
through the Canal. Of that in August, 1919, 7,928 tons were carried as deck load. 
Ships of 10 different nationalities were included in the month's traffic. The total 
Panama Canal net tonnage of commercial ships was 75,303 tons more than that of 
commercial ships passing through the Canal in July, when 15S ships of 510,808 tons 
made the transit. The cargo was 147,552 tons more than that handled through the 
Canal in July. 

Three British transports carried 2,259 troops through the Canal from Europe 
to New Zealand, and 1 United States transport carried 58 troops and 1,017 tons 
of cargo from New York to San Francisco, disembarking 86 passengers at Cristobal. 

The United States coastwise trade was made up of 26 vessels aggregating 99,087 
net tons, Panama Canal measurement, and carrying 154,219 tons of cargo. From the 
Atlantic to the Pacific, 4 ships with a total net tonnage of 19,132 net tons, Panama 
Canal measurement, carried 28,992 tons of cargo. From the Pacific to the Atlantic, 
22 vessels of 79,955 net tons, carried 125,227 tons of cargo. 

The United States Shipping Board operated 3 of the westbound ships in the coast- 
wise trade, with a net tonnage of 12,369 tons, Panama Canal measurement, carrying 
17,992 tons of cargo, and 20 of the 22 vessels eastbound. The net tonnage of the 20 
ships from Pacific to Atlantic aggregated 77,090 tons and their cargo amounted to 
125,227 tons. 

Among the principal commodities included in the traffic from the Pacific to the 
Atlantic during the month were: Flour, 3 whole cargoes, aggregating 23,922 tons; 
lumberand ties, 22 wholecargoes, 62,591 tons; 6 whole cargoes of nitrates, 27,088 tons; 
5 whole cargoes of sugar, amounting to 43,595 tons; barley, 6 whole cargoes, 17,950 
tons; 3 whole cargoes of wheat, 22,679 tons. Twenty-six ships carried general car- 
goes amounting to 74,623 tons. Four ships went in ballast from the west coast to 
Tampico; their aggregate net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, was 18,802 
tons. 

The bulk shipments from Atlantic to Pacific were: Fuel oil, 9,000 tons, for the 
west coast of South America; kerosene, 17,422 tons, of which 6,606 tons were from 
New Orleans to Shanghai, and 10,816 tons from Sabine to Hongkong; petroleum, 
18,992 tons, of which 7,992 tons were from New York to Nagasaki, and 11,000 tons 
from Beaumont to San Francisco; coal, 18,891 tons, of which 5,261 tons were from 
Norfolk, bound for the west coast of South America, 2,629 tons from Newport News 
to Callao, 4,500 tons from Norfolk to Port Chalmers, and 6,501 tons from Norfolk to 
Coquimbo; coke, 1,623 tons, from Baltimore to Callao; 3 cargoes of crude oil, 24,626 
tons, of which 9,261 tons were from Tampico to Tocopilla, and 15,365 tons from 



74 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Tampico to San Francisco; 1 cargo of case oil, 5,880 tons, from New York to 
Brisbane; 1 cargo of oil, 8,484 tons, from Beaumont to San Francisco; 1 cargo of 
railroad material, 932 tons, from New York to La Union; 1 cargo of Army supplies, 
1,997 tons from Baltimore to San Francisco; and 52 general cargoes amounting to 
209,108 tons. 

Commercial vessels passing through the Canal on their way to the west coast of 
Central and South America during August were, by nationalities, as follows: 



Nationality. 


No. 

of 

shi;-s. 


Registered 

gross 

tonnage. 


Registered 

net 
tonnage. 


Panama 
Canal net 
tonnage. 


Cargo. 




14 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 

18 


29,793 
19,130 
9,078 
8,065 
5,663 
4,952 
46,318 


17,987 
12,023 
5,503 
4,587 
3,458 
3,973 
28,872 


23,343 
14,288 
8,055 
5,459 
4,266 
4,013 
33,095 


Tons. 
19,550 




18,261 




2,093 




2,516 




700 




1,434 




45,183 






Total 


42 


122,999 


76,403 


92,519 


89,737 



Of the 42 vessels, 18 with 11,865 tons of cargo originated at the Atlantic terminus 
of the Canal; 17 with 50,289 tons, came from United States ports; 2 with 18,261 
tons of oil from Tampico; 1 with 903 tons of general cargo from Liverpool; 1 with 700 
tons of general cargo from Genoa; 1 with 1,434 tons of general cargo from Gothen- 
burg: 1 with 6,285 tons of general cargo from Glasgow, and 1 with no cargo from 
Puerto Plata. 

Shipments from the west coast of Central and South America through the Canal 
during August were carried by 37 vessels. Three were bound for Great Britain, with 
6,000 tons of sugar from Eten and 14,230 tons of general cargo from Chilean ports. 
Twenty-one completed the voyage at the Atlantic terminus of the Canal, discharging 
1 bulk cargo of 1,030 tons of ivory nuts from Nanta, and 24,165 tons of general cargo, 
including coffee, nuts, hides, and other raw materials. Nine ships were on the way 
to the United States; 6 had whole cargoes of nitrate, aggregating 27,088 tons of 
2,240 pounds; and 3 carried mixed cargoes, mostly ore, sugar, copper, wood, and 
hides, aggregating 9,981 tons. Four went in ballast to Tampico, Mexico; 3 were 
from Tocopilla, and 1 was from Corinto. 

By nationalities the ships from the west coast of South and Central America were as 
follows : 



Nationality. 


No. 

of 

ships 


Registered 

gross 
tonnage. 


Registered 

net 
tonnage. 


Panama 

Canal 

net 

tonnage. 


Carg*. 




17 
4 
2 
2 

12 


41,355 
12,894 
12,144 

7,(517 
36,369 


24,404 
7,793 
7,602 
3,941 

23,107 


32,369 

11,088 

9,246 

5,005 

26,014 


Ton*. 
33,194 




6.403 




8,024 




5,109 




30,261 






Totals 


37 


110,679 


66,847 


83,722 


82,994 







The distribution of the traffic through the Canal in August, 1919, according to the 
principal trade routes, was as follows: 



v 

Atlantic to Pacific. 

United States coastwise 

United States to South America 

Europe to South America 

Cristobal to South America 

Europe to west coast of North America 

Europe to Australia and New Zealand 

United States to Australia and New Zealand 

United States to Far East 

Cristobal to west coast of North America 

Mexico to west coast of North America 

Mexico to west coast of South America 

Miscellaneous 

Total , 

Pacific to Atlantic. 

United States coastwise 

West coast North America to Europe 

West coast South America to Europe 

West coast South America to United States 

West coast North America to Cristobal 



Ves- 
sels. 


Net 
tonnage. 


Cargo. 






Tons. 


4 


19,132 


28,992 


17 


40,103 


50,289 


4 


14,612 


9,322 


18 


26,908 


11,865 


2 


7,837 


1,182 


5 


39,431 


9,920 


8 


41,955 


50,881 


21 


99,072 


158,197 


2 


3,994 


3,739 


2 


8,651 


15,365 


2 


10,309 


18,261 


3 


2,508 


4,300 


8S 


314,512 


362,313 


22 


79,955 


125,227 


29 


64,259 


98,634 


3 


12,972 


20,730 


9 


21,100 


37,069 


3 


4,736 


4,524 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



75 



Ves- 



Net 
tonnage. 



Cargo. 



Pacific to Atlantic. — Continued. 

West coast South America lo Cristobal 

West coast South America to Mexico 

West coast North America to Cuba 

Australia and New Zealand to Europe 

Far East to east coast of North America 



30.848 
18,802 
2,854 
22,693 
13,380 



Ton*. 
25,195 

4,227 
18,808 
18,997 



Total. 



100 



271,599 



353,411 



•Ballast. 
SERVICES TO CANAL SHIPPING. 

Repairs were made on 1 1 1 vessels during the month, 65 at Cristobal and 46 at 
Balboa. Eleven vessels were dry docked at Cristobal and 7 at Balboa. Sales of fuel 
oil to ships from stock of The Panama Canal were 618.11 barrels to 3 vessels at Cris- 
tobal, and 4,127.76 barrels to 2 vessels at Balboa. Coal sales were 42,647 tons to 117 
vessels at Cristobal, and 6,237 tons to 21 vessels at Balboa, a total of 138 vessels 
receiving 48,884 tons. Water sold included 8,191,497 gallons to 181 vessels at Cris- 
tobal and 4,342,500 gallons to 153 vessels at Balboa, a total of 12,533,997 gallons to 
334 vessels. Sales of commissary supplies to commercial ships of lines other than that 
of the Panama Railroad aggregated $67,813.57, of which $43,318.85 worth, including 
$2,012.09 for laundry, was supplied at Cristobal and $24,494.72, including $1.71 for 
laundry at Balboa. Laundry service for all ships amounted to $3,116.86. Tug 
service performed for vessels using the Canal and the terminal ports was charged at 
$25,963.75, of which $12,063.75 was collected through the office of the Captain of the 
Port at Cristobal and $13,900 at Balboa. 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS. 

Details of the business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals of the 
Canal are shown in the following tabulation: 



Item. 


Cristobal. 


Balboa. 


Total. 




88 
314.512 
260.545 
402.170 
256.692 
362.313 
1,211 

37 
3 
3 
2 
9 

2 
2 
1 

29 


100 
271,599 
236,039 
355,673 
231.119 
353.411 
6,717 

25 

7 
4 
2 

1 
1 


188 




686,111 
496,584 






757,843 
487,811 
715 724 








7,928 
62 


Nationality of commercial ships through Canal: 










4 
10 






1 
2 




Dutch 














60 


89 






To'-d 


88 

149.137 

14.288 

8,055 

5,459 

40,770 


100 

76.369 

20.949 

11.088 

5.005 

4.037 

1,670 


188 

225,506 
35.237 
19 143 


Panama Canal net tonnage of commercial ships through the Canal: 
British 








10.464 
44,807 








7.980 
10.206 

4.266 
74.351 


7,980 
10,206 
4 266 


Dutch 




Italian 




United States 


152,481 


226,832 




Total 


314,512 

121.684 
12.281 

5,112 
3,579 
36.408 


271,599 

65,170 
17,726 
7,075 
3,351 
3,472 
1,566 


686,111 
186.854 


Dnited StateB equivalent net tonnage of commercial ships, through the 
Canal: 
British 


Norwegian 


Chilean 


12 187 


Permian 


6,930 

39,880 

1 666 




French 


Swedish 


6 071 

9,378 
3.9*1 
62.051 


6,071 
9,378 


Dutch 






137.679 


United States 


199 730 






Total 


260,545 


236,039 


496,684 



76 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Item. 



Cristobal. 



Balboa. 



Total 



Registered gross tonnage of commercial ships through the Canal: 

British 

Norwegian 

Chilean 

Peruvian 



French. 

Swedish 

Dutch 

Italian 

United States. 



Total 

Registered net tonnage of commercial ships, through the Canal: 

British 

Norwegian , 

Chilean 

Peruvian , 



French . 

Swedish 

Dutch 

Italian 

United States. 



Total. 



Cargo carried by ships of various nationalities: 

British. 

Norwegian 

Chilean 

Peruvian 



French. 

Swedish 

Dutch 

Italian 

United States. 



Total. 



Vessels passing through the Canal free of tolls: 

U. S. Navy battleships 

U. S. Navy cruisers 

U. S. Navy destroyers 

U. S. Navy colliers 

U. S. Navy supply ships 

U. S. Navy subchaser 

U. S. Navy submarine 

U. S. Navy sub-tender 

U. S. Navy mine-planter 

U. S. Navy mine-sweepers 

U. S. Navy tug and target 

U. S. Army tugs 

U. S. Army transport 



Total 

Laanches 

Net tonnage of launches. Panama Canal measurement 

Total ocean-going ships transiting Canal , 

Total vessels transiting Canal 

Cargo on which no tolls were charged 

Commercial ships through Canal without cargo, but not in ballast . 

Net tonnage of above, Canal measurement 

Commercial ships through Canal in ballast 

Net tonnage of above, Canal measurement 

Total of commercial ships without cargo transiting Canal 

Net tonnage of above, Canal measurement 

Motor ships through Canal 

Net tonnage of motor ships, Canal measurement 

Sailing ships through the Canal 

Net tonnage of sailing ships, Canal measurement 

Tolls levied on laden ships through the Canal, 

Tolls levied on ships in ballast 

Tolls on launches 

Supplemental payments, previous passages 



187,725 

19,130 

9,078 

S.065 

52,477 



8,726 
12.S17 

5,663 
98,489 



402,170 

118,770 

12,023 

5,503 

4,587 

35,451 



6,848 
8,137 
3,458 
61,915 



256,692 

153, ?41 
18,261 
2,093 
2,516 
65,595 



1,434 

14,060 

700 

103,813 



362,313 



31 
1 
1 

119 

120 

39,922 

3 
26,699 

6 
10,237 

9 
36,936 

6 



Total tolls levied ...... 

Total Bhips entering port, including Canal transit 

Total ships clearing from port including Canal transit 

Total ships handled 

Net registered tonnage of vessels entering port 

Net registered tonnage of vessels clearing port 



$314,196 15 

7,370.64 

1.20 

1,250.00 



94,431 
26,881 
12,894 
7,917 
4,557 
2,705 



206,288 



355,673 

59,759 
17,199 
7,793 
2,941 
3,247 
1,646 



137,534 



231,119 

84,494 
29,766 
6,406 
5,109 
4,870 
2,329 



220,437 



353,411 



103 
103 



6 

21,667 

6 

21,667 

8 

7,730 

4 

6.162 

$269,828.45 

15,796.92 

3.60 

1.000.00 



$322,817.99 
244 
237 



$286,628.97 
228 
231 



481 459 

697,624 666,984 

685.420 712,100 



Total for vessels entering and clearing i 



1.3S3.044 I 1,379,084 



34 
1 
1 

222 

223 

39,922 

• 3 

26,699 

12 

31,904 

15 

58.603 

14 

16,696 

4 

6,162 

$584,024.60 

23,167.56 

4.80 

2,250.00 



$609,446.96 
472 
468 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



77 



Item. 


Cristobal. 


Balbea. 


Total. 




1,043,104 
1,022.058 


958,835 
1,001,742 


2,001,939 




2,023,800 










2.065,162 

43 

95,478 

162,904 

40 

86,144 

145,955 

34 
92,522 
129,665 

30 
88,395 
122,543 

787,938 
764,077 


1,960,577 
10 
47,376 
49,759 
8 
38,985 
42,469 

34 

44,850 
75,969 

36 

49,578 

82,268 

751,313 

743,193 


4,025.739 




53 




142,854 




212,663 




48 




125,129 




188,424 


Vessels passing through Canal, and handling passengers or cargo at 


68 




137,372 




205,634 


Vessels passing through Canal, and handling passengers or cargo 


it port, 


66 




137,973 




204,811 




. tons. . 
..tons. . 
.tons. . 

;y of 

. tons . . 
..tons. . 


1,539,251 




1.507,270 




25.902 
5,220 


3,839 
2.587 


29,741 




7,807 




31,122 


6.426 


37,548 




813.840 

769,297 

78.172 

44 ,892 

1,434 


755,152 

745,780 

8,117 

3.150 

4,337 


1,568,992 


Cargo received by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R... 
Cargo dispatched by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R . . 
Cargo rehandled by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R.. 


1,515,077 

86,289 

48,042 

5,771 


Total cargo handled by Receiving and Forwarding Agen 
P. R. R 


124,498 

59,989 

99 

34,700 

6 

709 

8 

7,143 

4 

95 

117 

42,647 

795 

242 

2,090 

480 


15,604 

1,917 

15 

3,388 


140,102 


Commercial vessels other than P. R. R. supplied with bunker coal 
Coal supplied to commercial vessels other than Panama Railroad 


61,906 

114 

38,088 

6 




709 




5 

2,807 

1 

42 

21 

6,237 


13 






9,950 
5 


Coal supplied to U. S. Army vessels 


.tons. . 


137 

138 






48,884 
795 






242 




645 


2,735 




480 








46,254 


6,882 

3,419 

3,000 

153 

4,342,500 

7 

81 


53,136 
3,419 




86,616 

181 

8,191,497 

11 

138 

9 

30 


89,616 
334 






12,533,997 




18 




219 




9 


Other U. S. Government vessels furnished commissary supplies . . . 




21 


51 




177 

$979.12 

9,770.32 

28,032.89 

2,012.09 

2,524.43 


102 

$742 81 

4,076.20 

17,067.58 

1,71 

2,606.42 


279 


Commissary sales to commercial vessels: 

lee 


$1,721.93 




13,846.52 




45,100.47 




2,013 80 




5,130.85 








Total 


$43,318.85 

$132 00 

1,660.97 

5,033.79 

582.19 

652 61 


S24.494.72 


$67,813.57 


Commissary sales to Panama Railroad vessels: 


$132.00 






1,660.97 






5,033.79 






582.19 






652.61 










Total ... . 


S3 ,061.56 

$164 26 

6,858.46 

26,832.06 

286.68 

2,213.86 




$8,061.56 


Commissary sales to other Government vessels: 

Ice 


$429.15 

8,376.31 

25,603.99 

234. 19 

816.11 


$593.41 




15,234.77 




52,436.05 




520.87 




3,029.97 








Total 


$36,355.32 


$35,459.75 


$71,815.07 










$87,735.73 


$59,954.47 


$147,690.20 



78 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Item. 


Cristobal. 


Balboa. 


Total. 






210 51 

310 60 

7,798 82 

97 00 


4,127.76 


4,338.27 
310.60 


Fuel oil issued to Canal departments 




i5,762.54 
279.08 


23,561.36 
376.08 


Total furnished from Canal tanks 

Other oil pumped 


8,416.93 
24.143.59 
233,234.93 


20,169.38 
98,532.45 
14,594.30 


28,586 31 
122,676.04 
247,829.23 


Diesel oil on hand September 1 




1,516.21 

1,547 
3,061 


1,516.21 


Passengers arriving, including transit passengers: 




3,410 
3,100 


4,957 


Other than first cabin 


6,161 








Total 


6,510 

2,930 
3,626 


4,608 

1,542 
3,112 


11,118 


Total passengers departing including transit passengers: 

First cabin 


4,472 




6,738 








Total 


6 556 


4.654 


11,210 










13,066 

1.987 
986 


9,262 

190 

49 


22,328 


Passengers disembarking: 


2,177 




1,035 








Total 


2,973 

2,004 
943 


239 

185 
100 


3,212 


Passengers embarking: 


2,189 




1,043 








Total 


2,917 

277 

169 

3 


285 

106 

60 

3 

1 


3,232 


8ervicee to American seamen: 


383 




229 




6 


Seamen deceased 


1 




30 


30 












479 

84,743.10 

83,738 16 

S12.749.98 

2 
3 
2 
13 
2 


170 
82 034 45 
82,065 08 
$3,499.53 


649 




86.777 55 




$5,803 24 




$16,249.51 


Services to American vessels: 


2 






3 




6 

6 


8 




19 




2 



LOCK OPERATIONS. 

Lockages of commercial vessels were made during the month as follows: 





Number of lockages. 


Number of vessels. 




North. 


South. 


Total. 


North. 


South. 


TotaL 




95 
99 
92 


86 
SO 
85 


181 
189 
177 


101 
100 
100 


90 
90 
90 


191 




190 




190 



Army and Navy vessels, and vessels operated by The Panama Canal are included 
in the following summary of all lockages during the month: 



Lockages. 


Gatun. 


Pedro 
Miguel. 


Miraflores. 




181 

21 

5 


189 
22 
IS 


177 




21 




19 






Total 


207 

191 
61 


229 

190 

76 


217 


7eesels: 


190 




74 






Total 


252 


266 


264 



Water consumed for all lockages amounted to 1,570,880,000 cubic feet, that used 
at Pedro Miguel becoming available for second use at Miraflores Locks. 
Consumption of water during the month was as follows: 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



79 





Cubic feet. 




Gatun. 


Pedro Miguel. 


Miraflores. 




858,860,000 
20,000,000 


722.020,000 
28,980,000 
3,810,000 


652,910,000 




14,000,000 












Total 


878,860,000 


754,810,000 


666,910,000 







METEOROLOGY. 

Rainfall during the month was generally deficient, especially on the Atlantic side. 
The fall at Colon, 6.77 inches, was the least August precipitation at that station 
6ince 1902. The greatest monthly fall was at Indio, totaling 18. S4 inches, and the 
minimum was at Miraflores, 4.02 inches. The greatest precipitation recorded in 24 
hours was 4.78 inches, at Porto Bello on the 14th. 

A slight seismic disturbance was recorded at Balboa Heights on the evening of 
August 18, which although of slight amplitude, was felt by a number of people in 
Ancon and Balboa. The epicenter of this disturbance was about 100 miles distant, 
probably to the south. . 

The Chagres River discharge at Alhajuela was 31 per cent below the 18-year August 
average, or 2,049 c. f. s. against a mean of 2,986 c. f. s. The Chagres furnished 40 
per cent of the Gatun Lake total yield. There was one freshet in the Chagres River 
during the month with a rise of more than 5 feet at Alhajuela. 

The elevation of Gatun Lake on August 31, was 85.29, as compared with 85.26 
at the end of the prior month. 

A severe electric storm occurred on the Atlantic side on August 5, during which 
an observation balloon at Coco Solo was burned and the mess hall was struck and 
slightly damaged. 

ELECTRICAL DIVISION. 

Gatun hydroelectric station — The net output of the hydroelectric station for the 
month of August was 5,332,123 K. W. H., and the computed water consumption was 
4,043,885,000 cubic feet. 

Miraflores steam plant — The net output of the steam plant was minus 187,950 
K. W. H., and the oil consumption was 2,368.42 barrels. 

Total power output — The total net power out put for both generating stations was 
5,144,173 K. W. H., and the total amount of power distributed to feeders by sub- 
stations and generating plants was 4,637,893 K. W. H., representing an energy loss 
of 9.84 per cent. 

Transmission line — There was one interruption to transmission service during the 
month. Line No. 1 failed at 12.25 p. m., on the 2d, from unknown cause, interrupting 
service at Cristobal 1 minute, Darien 8 minutes, Gamboa 2 minutes, and Balboa 2 
minutes. 

Marine work — Repairs and additions of electrical equipment were made at Cristo- 
bal on the following vessels, under 22 work orders: Steamships Middlebury, Urubam- 
ba, Kineo, Carrillo, Colon, Caribbean, Advance, Mono, Jamaica, Panama, Nemesis, 
Paraiso, and City of Para; tug Engineer and dredge Paraiso. The work in progress 
on the steamships Middlebury and Caribbean of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line 
advanced to 95 and 65 per cent of completion, respectively. At Balboa, electrical 
work was done on the following vessels: Anubis, Cristobal, Azov, Snetind, Fort Sill, 
Santa Elena, Ossining, Acuelo, Mario de Ronde, Brookside, Mount Shasta, Chipchung, 
Bushrod, Pakeha, Eyota, Fort Seward, Belding, Charles Nelson, Buhisan, Grayling, 
Afalkey, Lake Sanford, Guardian, Orotina, Cow Boy, Aimwell, Tuckanuck, submarine 
C-4, U. S. S. Cleveland, Melville, Rhode Island, tugs Bolivar and Empire, dredge 
Cascadas, and barges No. 13 and No. 29. 

New construction — The installation of lighting in the new cold storage plant at 
Cristobal was completed during the month, and the installation of the electrical 
equipment there advanced to 96 per cent of completion. Installatic n in the slaughter- 
house adjoining remains 95 per cent complete. Electrical work at Pier 6, Cristobal, 
was 80 per cent complete at the end of the month. 

SHOPS, FOUNDRY, AND DRY DOCK WORK. 

The repairs to the ex-German vessel Anubis were continued. The two main engine 
cylinders were received from the United States and completely machined, ready to be 
erected in place, at the end of the month. Nearly all the machinery to be received 
from the United States had been received or was en route and it is expected that the 
vessel will be completed and turned over to the Shipping Board by the end of Sep- 
tember. 



80 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Definite instructions were received to convert the steamship Cristobal from coal to 
oil burning and to enlarge her passenger accommodations. Details remain still to be 
settled but the situation was unlocked to such an extent by the two decisions noted 
that the work may now be expected to proceed rapidly. 

Repairs and general overhauling of the steamship Azov were completed, except 
for the finishing touches and the trial of the vessel's machinery. 

At the beginning of the month the U. S. S. Cleveland was being repaired at the 
Balboa shops, subject to the provision that the shio must not be disabled to such an 
extent that she could not be ready for sea upon 48 hours' notice. Such notice was 
given on Saturday, August 9, at an hour when most of the employees might be 
expected to be out of reach of the telephone on account of the more or less general 
custom of seeking amusement away from home on Saturday night. This was the 
most difficult time that could be found to call in extra men and finish up work on a 
ship to meet departure on short notice; nevertheless, all unfinished work was com- 
pleted well within the time set for the departure of the vessel. 

The U. S. S. Melville was towed to the Balboa shops, arriving August 16, in a dis- 
abled condition; both of her boilers having been burnt out at sea. New boiler tubes 
were secured from the cruiser Charleston and the defective tubes in the boilers of the 
Melville were replaced and tested to Navy requirements. After departure the vessel 
returned from the Pacific because the boilers again showed signs of failure. The Navy 
Department thereupon decided to modify her furnaces and oil burning system. At 
the end of August the vessel was still moored before the shops waiting the arrival 
of the modified furnace fronts and oil-burning system which are being sent from 
the United States to be installed by the Mechanical Division. 

During the month the battleship Rhode Island, which had passed through the Canal 
with the Pacific Fleet, put back to Balboa with the starboard propeller shaft disabled. 
The vessel was docked on August 11, and it was found that the outside shaft coupling 
had broken, allowing the propeller and propeller shaft to come aft in the strut until 
brought up by the remnants of the coupling. The propeller shaft was bent; the 
strut torn loose, top and bottom, a hole punched in the shell of the ship in one of the 
after compartments, and the after peak tank and steering engine room were flooded 
where the strut fastenings had torn loose. The wreckage was removed, the hole in 
the shell closed and the strut reriveted. A new propeller shaft and coupling were 
machined from rough machined spares carried on board. Meanwhile, the stern tube 
was removed from the ship after considerable difficulty; and after removal was found 
to be cracked. There being no spare on board and no billet on the Isthmus of sufficient 
size or quality for the manufacture of a new shaft, the vessel was ordered North under 
one engine by the Navy Department for repairs. Accordingly, she was redocked, 
made secure for the voyage and the parts gotten out at Balboa placed on board. 

A new feed line was supplied the cruiser Salem, and a quantity of work was per- 
formed on her boilers. 

Minor repairs were made to minesweepers Tern and Bran!. 

The heavy operating repairs in progress at the beginning of the month on steam- 
ships Fort Sill, Ossining, Santa Elena, and Aculeo were completed during the month 
and a large amount of miscellaneous commercial work was performed for various 
vessels. 

At the Cristobal shops the following vessels arrived for repairs: Caribbean, Oraton, 
Urubamba, Culebra, Orator, Brookside, Afalkey, General Goethals, Balboa, Balsto, 
Palena, Republic, Paraiso, Cauca, tug Sea Rover, General' Ernst, Salvador, Finisterre, 
Kineo, Jamaica, Acidbia, Acajutla, A.G. Forse, Lake Wilson, Gold Shell, Panama, 
Guatemala, Metapan, Cranenest, Abangarez, Allianca, Manavi, Middlebury ,SanGiorgiol ', 
Colon, Benoni, Advance, Aberdeen, Chile, West Isley, Deer Lodge, Nemesis, Antera, 
City of Melbourne, Peru, Ucayali, Chiquimula, tug Porto Bello, tug Tavernilla, barge 
No. 49, barge No. 17, U. S. S. Brutus, Fort Bragg, San Bias, Bologna, G. W. Elder, 
Castle Point, C. W. Fields, City of Para, Braeburn, Champlain, derrick barge No. 157, 
and transport Kilpatrick. 

Of the above the following were in dry dock during the month: Barge No. 17, 
steamships Caribbean, Jamaica, Manavi, Nemesis, Paraiso, San Bias, motorboat 
Orotina, tug A.G. Forse, cable ship Cyrus W. Fields, and derrick barge No. 157. 

At the Cristobal shops 199 individual and company job orders were issued during 
the month, 6 of which were for work on Navy craft, none for submarines. Of the 
remaining 183, 86 covered repairs to ships making this port or in transit of the Canal, 
exclusive of Panama Railroad ships. The work of overhauling the steamship Culebra, 
prior to turning her over to the Dredging Division, was continued during the month. 
The work of converting the steamship Middlebury into a cattle carrier was completed 
during the month. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



81 



Work was performed at the Balboa shops during the month for the following ves- 
sels: Steamers Brookside, Aculeo ,Ossining, Azov, Anubis, Cristobal, Salvador, Acajutla, 
Chipchung, West Islay, Bushrod, Eyota, Sherman, Pakeha, Fort Seward, Helding, 
Lompoc, Buhisan, Grayling, Crabtree, Afalkey, La Habra, Braeburn, Lake Sanford, 
Aimwell, Cow Boy, War Culumn, Tuckanuck, Cauca, cable ship Guardian, U. S. S. 
Melville, U. S. S. Cleveland, U. S. S. Rhode Island, U. S. S. Salem, U. S, S. Tern, 
U. S. S. Brant, motorships Marie de Ronde, Santa Elena, Pauline, Mount Shasta, 
Orotina, Maranon, Chiriqui, and Snetind, schooner Falketind, and steam schooner 
Chas. Nelson. 

The following vessels were in dry dock at Balboa during the month: Steamships 
Cristobal, Azov, Anubis, U. S. S. Rhode Island, cable ship Guardian, tugs Cocoli and 
Bolivar. 

Foundry output, compared with that of July, was as follows: 





August. 


July. 




PounAt. 

130,226} 
34,860 
28, 086 f 


Poundt. 
143,370$ 


Steel 


45,070 




19,308 



Equipment was hostled as follows: Locomotives, 1,603; cranes, 196; making 
a total of 1,799. Two hundred and ninety-eight shop and 1,575 field repairs were 
made on cars, 759 freight cars were packed, and 2,053 passenger coaches were packed, 
cleaned, oiled, and inspected. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 

Assembling of the towers and material for the Puerto Obaldia radio station was 
completed during the month, and on August 28, the entire outfit was transported to 
Puerto Obaldia. 

Installation of offal room equipment at the abattoir was completed during the 
month. Oleo equipment was brought to 95 per cent and the lard equipment to 90 
per cent of completion. 

The canning plant building at Mount Hope was completed, except for the installa- 
tion of an elevator. 

The boiler house and exterior steam lines of the Mount Hope cold storage plant 
were completed during the month. The machine shop was 87 per cent completed, 
and the carpenter shop 90 per cent completed. 

Of the ten 12-family quarters at Mount Hope, 8 buildings were completed and the 
other 2 were completed except for painting. 

The office building of the Central and South American Telegraph Company at 
Balboa was 40 per cent completed. 

The tuberculosis ward of Corozal Hospital remains 80 per cent completed. 

The office for the Lighthouse Subdivision at Gatun was 90 per cent completed. 

Terminal construction — The status of the work under way at Pier 6, Cristobal, is 
as follows: Doors, 99 per cent ; cranes, 5 per cent; and trimming work, 100 per cent 
completed. The pier is now practically completed except for installation of cargo- 
handling cranes and putting on finish wash on outside walls. 

Reconstruction of the Royal Mail pier at Colon was started during the month. 
Plant was assembled and one section of floor slab was brought to 10 per cent com- 
pletion. 

DREDGING DIVISION. 

The total excavation by dredges during August was 367,150 cubic yards, as follows: 





Classified as: 




Stations. 


Equipment. 


Cubic yards. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


of work. 


24,800 (a) 


24,800 

122,000 

1,050 

2,6?0 

It, 700 

10,600 

58,000 

SI, 200 


4.500 
7.850 
24,000 
15,800 


Maintenance . < 
Maintenance. . . . 

Aux. Const 

Maintenance... . 
Maintenance... . 

Total for month 


2289-00 to 2300-60 W. 1 


No. 88. 


122,000 (a) 


2186-00 to 2174-50 W. / 

2218-00 to 2221-25 E 


No. 84. 


5,550 (fc) 


Pier No. 6, Cristobal 




10,500 (6) 






38,700 (6) 






26,400 (b) 






58,000 (c) 






81,200 (c) 




No. 88. 








367,150 


315,000 


52.150 





(a) Pacific entrance. (6) Atlantic entrance, (c) Balboa inner harbor. 
The following disposition was made of the excavated material: Thirty thousand 
five hundred cubic yards were dumped in San Juan fill; 116,300 cubic yards in 
Pacific entrance flats, west of channel; 58,000 cubic yards from the Pacific entrance 
at sea; 81,200 cubic yards in Diablo Dump "A"; and 81,150 cubic yards in between 
land end of the East breakwater and Margarita Point. 



82 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



The excavation remaining to be done in the Canal prism on September 1, was 
173,200 cubic yards, the same as stated for August 1, in my report for July, no original 
excavation within the prism having been performed during August. 

During the month forces of the Dredging Division made borings on the area selected 
for a proposed ferry landing near Mindi. 

MUNICIPAL DIVISION. 

The road to the cold storage plant at Mount Hope was completed in August; 
14,103 square yards of road and 1,414 linear feet of curb were concreted during the 
month. The extension of the road to Pier 6 at Cristobal was also completed. The 
renewal of the cast iron discharge line from the sewage sump in Colon is. held up 
indefinitely, pending availability of necessary material. Work in Block 29, Colon, 
was completed during the month. Work of grading and filling the new townsite at 
Mount Hope for silver employees, was advanced to 40 per cent of completion, 7,480 
cubic yards having been excavated and filled and 1,510 square yards graded. On 
the circulating water system for the cold storage plant at Mount Hope, 1,993 cubic 
yards were excavated, 942 cubic yards backfilled, and 415 linear feet of 20-inch 
dredge pipe were laid ; this work is 65 per cent completed. Reversing the sewer grades 
in 16th, 17th, 19th, and 20th streets, Panama, was brought to completion during 
August. 

This division did extensive work in grading and filling and the construction 
of track, sewers, and water lines at the Army posts at Gatun and Miraflores, of which 
separate report has been made. 

Water pumped in the southern district amounted to 617,943,000 gallons, and in 
the northern district to 207,402,000 gallons, making a total of 825,345,000 gallons. 
This was an increase of 37,490,500 gallons over the quantity pumped in July. Colon 
was furnished with 46,107,055 gallons of water, Panama with 86,101,000 gallons and 
12,533,997 gallons were supplied to 334 ships. The incinerator at Gavilan Island 
burned 2,059 tons of garbage and 53 dead animals during the month. 

WORKING FORCE. 

Effective August 20, 1919. 



Department or Division. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


TotaL 


Operation and Maintenance: 

Office 


38 
272 
270 
125 
162 
147 
963 
135 

62 


42 

1,790 

347 

2,635 

557 

829 

1,830 

362 

282 


80 




2,062 




617 




2,760 




719 




976 




2,793 




497 




344 






Total 


2,174 

147 
28 
247 
34 
228 
241 
493 

64 
163 
88 

S7 
5 


8,647 

1,735 
412 

1,550 

716 

12 

1,155 
181 

528 
282 
1,722 
795 
99 


10,848 


Supply Department: 


1,900 




440 


Commissary 


1,797 




750 




240 


Health 


1,396 




674 


Panama Railroad: 


592 




445 




1,810 




882 




104 








.3,999 


17,879 


21 .878 



The total gold force at work on August 20 was 366 more than the 3,633 at work 
on July 23, and the silver force was 189 more than the 17,690 then at work. As 
compared with the gold force for the corresponding month of last year, reported as 
of August 21, 1918, the gold force was an increase of 1,114 over the 2,850 at work on 
that date, and the silver force an increase of 1,653 over the 16,226 of that day. 

The occupation of quarters on August 31, was as follows: 



Occupants. 


Men. 


Women. 


Children. 


Total. 




3,469 

206 

5,365 


2.118 

39 

2,000 


2,515 

66 

3.813 


8,102 




311 




11,178 








Total 


9,040 


4,157 


6,394 


19,591 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 83 

PUBLIC HEALTH. 

One hundred and twenty-six cases of malaria were admitted to the Canal Zone 
hospitals; 1 death resulted from malaria, as compared with 262 admissions and 2 
deaths during the month of July. Influenza admissions numbered 20, as compared 
with 37 during the preceding month. There were no deaths from influenza. There 
were 6 admissions and 5 deaths from pneumonia, as compared with 6 admissions 
and 1 death during the preceeding month. One case of yellow fever was received at 
quarantine from Nicaragua. The patient died on the day of admission. One case of 
smallpox from the interior of the Republic of Panama was admitted to Ancon Hos- 
pital. 

RECEIPTS AND SALES OF MATERIAL AND SUPPLIES. 

The value of material received during the month on United States requisitions was 
$525,760.57, as compared with $439,572.67 in July. Of that received in August, 
$480,885.92 was chargeable to operation and maintenance; $19,475.72 to construc- 
tion and equipment; and $25,398.93 to miscellaneous departments. Isthmian cash 
sales from storehouses and obsolete store amounted to $46,463.69, of which $40,928.67 
was for stock, $1,458.20 for scrap, and $4,076.82 for obsolete and second-hand ma- 
terial. The more important sales made during the month in the United States were 
as follows: Dredge spare parts, $1,457.76; 6 pairs of skid chains, $67.20; 6 pairs of 
nonskid chains, $31.98. On the Isthmus, important sales of obsolete material in- 
cluded a 20-ton locomotive crane for $2,500; 20 tons of rail for $600; 48,200 pounds 
of scrap iron for $482; 2\ K. W. generator for $300; a steel barge for $150; and the 
hull of clapet No. 4, for $150. 

The total sales of material from storehouses to steamships for the month, including 
fuel oil, but excluding sales by the Commissary Division, amounting to $147,690.20, 
were $25,782.84. Sales of commissary supplies to all purchasers for the month aggre- 
gated $1,020,270.16, made up as follows: To steamships, other than United States 
Naval vessels and those of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, $67,813.57; to 
Panama Railroad vessels, $8,061.56; to The Panama Canal, $130,527.07; to the 
United States Government, including sales to the Army and Navy, $228,418.77; 
to individuals and companies, principally through charge accounts in the retail stores, 
$17,312.26; to the Panama Railroad including the Hotel Washington, $20,764.19; 
and to individuals purchasing with coupons, $547,372.74. 

FINANCIAL RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The cash balance in Canal appropriations on August 31, exclusive of fortifications, 
was $16,369,782.27; the balance in fortifications was $7,703,480.67. Payments from 
appropriations by Disbursing Clerk in Washington, amounted to $515,856.07 and 
by the Paymaster on the Isthmus to $1,444,506.25. Purchases of commissary books 
from the Panama Railroad Company amounted to $322,070.49. Collections of tolls 
totaled $608, 196.96. Deposits of $230,358.40 were made with the Assistant Treasurer 
of the United States to be applied on payment of tolls and other charges against 
vessels using the Canal. The total Panama Canal collections on the Isthmus were 
$1,767,094.59, and collections by the Disbursing Clerk, Washington, $83,627.03. 
Receipts from the Canal Zone and miscellaneous funds were $133,895.06, and dis- 
bursements from the same source amounted to $181,194.71. August pay rolls on the 
Isthmus aggregated $1,229,398.32, as compared with $1,225,661.93 for July, a differ- 
ence of $3,736.39. 

Respectfully, 

Chester Harding, Governor. 

The "Culebra" to Return to Dredging. 

The steamship Culebra, which has been used by the Panama Railroad 
Steamship Line for carrying cattje and other live stock from Colombian 
ports to the Canal Zone for the Cattle Industry Division, is being 
readjusted at Cristobal shops for service in its original capacity of sea- 
going suction dredge and is to be returned to the Dredging Division. 
The dredge will be used in maintenance work, principally for the 
removal of silt, and will range through all sections of the Canal as 
needed. The steamship Middlebury has been chartered from the 
United States Shipping Board and placed in service in the place of 
the Culebra, and the Caribbean, former suction dredge, sister ship of 
the Culebra, and the first of the cattle carriers of the Cattle Industry 
Division, remains in the cattle service with the Middlebury. 



84 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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86 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending September 27, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Newport 

Fair haven 

Imperial 

Middlebury 

Laura C.Hall.... 

Lake Hurst 

Heredia 

Ucayali 

Palena 

Carrillo 

Lake Wilson 

Turrialba 

Manavi 

Tivives 

Colon 

Gen. 0. H. Ernst. 

Kilpatrick 

AHbnca 

Loeiean 



Line or charterer. 



Pacific-Mail Steamship Line , 

Anglo- American S. S. Agency 

United Fruit Company 

Panama Railroad Commissary 

Anglo-American S. S. Agency 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 

United Fruit Company 

Peruvian Steamship Line 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 

United Fruit Company 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United Fruit Company 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 

United States Government 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 
Levland Line 



Arrived. 



September 21 
September 21 



September 22 
September 23 
September 24 
September 24 
September 24 
September 24 



September 25 
September 25 



September 26 
September 27 



Departed. 



September 22 
September 22 
September 24 
September 24 
September 24 



September 24 



September 25 
September 25 
September 25 



September 26 



Serter. ber 27 



Cargo — 



Discharged Laded. 



Tom 



847 



1,199 
1,211 
1,642 
92 
1,398 
1,539 



2 
3,000 



485 
2,007§ 



Tom. 



720 
16 
45 

1,971 
464 



146 

723 

1 



3,895 



2,421 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending September 28, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 


Manavi 


Fairhaven Steamship Company 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Rolph Coal and Navigation Co 

Rolnh Coal and Navigation Co 


September 20 
September 25 
September 24 
Sentember 25 


September 21 
September 25 
September 26 

Sentember 28 


Tom. 
98 
(*) 
125 
206 


Ton*. 
(t) 

2 
(t) 
125 


Annetti Rolph 



* No cargo discharged. 



f No cargo laded. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal post officer and clubhouses. In cases where such anouncements are not posted, 
persons interested mav obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights, (telephone 286) : 

Farm economist (male); No. 416-amended; October 21, 1919. The United States Civil Service 
Commission announces the amendment of the announcement of the open competitive examination for 
farm economist (announcement No. 416) by the omission of the word "extension" in the last lines of the 
sixth and seventh paragraphs, and by the postponement of the date by which applications must be on 
file with the Civil Service Commission at Washington, D. C, prior to the hour of closing business, from 
September 2 3 to October 21,1919. 

Junior computer (male and female); No. 448-amended; October 8, 1919. The United States Civil 
Service Commission announces that the open competitive examination for junior computer. Bureau of 
Mines, will be held on October 8, instead of on October 8 and 9, as stated in the original announcement 
(No. 448). The statement in the original announcement that "Two days will be required for this 
examination" is incorrect and onlv one dav will be allowed. 

Training officer (male); $2,400 to $3,000 a year; No. 433; form 2118; age, at least 24 years but under 
50 years, t 

Training assistant (male) ; $1,500 to $2,400 a year; No. 433; form 2118; age, at least 24 years bat 
under 50 years, t 

Placement officer (male) ; $2,400 to $3,000 a year; No. 433; form 2118; age, at least 24 years but 
under 50 years, t 

District medical officer (male); $1 ,800 to $3,000 a year; No. 433; form 2118; age, at least 25 years 
but under 65 years, t 

Assistant medical officer (male) ; $1,800 to $2, 750 a year; No. 433; form2118; age, at least 25 years 
but under 65 years, f 

Placement assistant (male) ; $1,500 to $2,400 a year; No. 433; form 2118; age, at least 24 but under 
50 years, t 

Assistant eccnomist in marketing (male); Grade 1, $1,800 to S2.400; Grade 2, $2,400 to $3,000 a 
year; No. 464; November 5, 1919; form 1312; age. Grade 1, at least 22 years; Grade 2, at least 25 
years. 

Clerk, Bureau of the Census (male and female); $900 to $1,029 a year; No. 461; October 18, 1919. 
and November 15, 1919; form 304; age, at least 18 years but under 50 years. 

Claims examiner (male) ; $1,800 to $2,500 a year; No. 437-amended; October 8, 1919; the require- 
ment that applicants must not have reached their fiftieth birthday on the date of the examination is 
eliminated. 

Trained nurse (female); No. 1952-amended. 

The United States Civil Service Commission announces the amendment of the maximum age require- 
ment of the open competitive nonassembled continuous examination for trained nurse (announcement 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 87 

No. 1952-A), so as to provide that for the public health service, applicants must not have reached their fiftieth 
birthday on the date of making oath to the application, instead of that they must not have reached their 
forty-fifth birthday on such date. 

Drainage engineer (male) : $1,800 to $2,100 a year; November 4. 1919; form 1312; age, at least 25 
years but less than 45 years. Persons entitled to preference because of military or naval service are 
released from age requirements.* 

Map colorist (male and female) ; $900 a year; November 5, 1919; form 1312; age, at least 18 years, 
but less than 40 years. Persons entitled to preference because of military or naval service are released 
from age limitations. 

Forest ranger (male); $900 to $1,200 ; October 27, 1919; form 1312; age, at least 21 vears but less 
than 40 years. Persons entitled to preference because of military or naval service are released from age 
requirements. 



♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing buskiess 
on that date. 

tNonassernbled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 

The United States Civil Service Commission announces that as sufficient eligibles to meet the needs 
of the service have been obtained from the open competitive nonassembled continuous examinations 
listed below, until further notice no applications for these examinations will be accepted unless filed with 
the Commission at Washington, D. C., prior to the hour of closing business on September 23, 1919. 
(Issued September 5, 1019). No. 374, Assistant in marketing dairy products. Grade 1, $1,800 to $2,400; 
No. 570 Inspector of dairy products, $1,800 to $2,400 a year; No. 596, assistant to transportation, Grade 
t, $1 ,800 to $2,700 a year. 



Membership in Canal Clubhouses Discontinued. 

The Governor has authorized the discontinuance of memberships 
in the Panama Canal clubhouses, effective September 1, 1919. All 
members may have the balance due them on that date refunded, if 
the request is made to the local secretary in writing, and is accom- 
panied by unexpired membership card. Request for refund should 
be made as soon as convenient. 



Wind Storm at Gamboa. 

The Chief Hydrog^apher has made the following report of a severe 
wind storm which visited the vicinity of Gamboa, near the north end 
of Gaillard Cut, on September 26. Salvaging operations on the gravel 
cranes were begun by the Dredging Division on September 29: 

A wind storm r f unusual severity occurred at Gamboa shortly after noon on Sep- 
tember 26, 1919. The storm moved down the Chagres River arm of Gatun Lake 
from the northeast and \v;is accompanied by heavy rainfall. 

The high winds at Gamboa continued for only 21 minutes, from 12.29 p. m. to 
12.50 p. m. During this time the wind shifted from northwest to north, northeast, 
east and southeast, but nearly all of the strongest winds blew from the northeast. 

The maximum velocity recorded at the Gamboa station was 50 miles an hour from 
the northeast at 12.45 p. m. It is thought that the center of the storm passed over 
a depression in the ridge and across the Canal about midway between the Gamboa 
hydrographic station and the Gamboa signal station, and that there the wind veloci- 
ties were considerably higher. A tree 15 to 18 inches in diameter of vigorous growth 
was broken off clean, indicating a maximum wind velocity of 70 or more miles per 
hour. 

The path of destructive winds was relatively narrow, approximately \ mile in 
width, and it is thought that the storm soon spent itself as no damage was reported 
except in the vicinity of Gamboa. 

The two unloading cranes at the Gamboa gravel plant were overturned and wrecked 
causing damage estimated at about $20,000. 

A silver quarters building at Gamboa was partly unroofed, the monitor on the 
Marine Division signal station was torn off, and three buildings were similarly 
damaged at the Gamboa stockade. Most of the buildings damaged were old French 
buildings in a state of partial decay. Except for the signal station no new buildings 
at Gamboa weie materially damaged. Nearly all fruit trees were considerably dam- 
aged in the strrm path. 

Storms of this type have a gyratory or whirlwind motion and resemble in many 
respects the destructive tornadoes (miscalled cyclones) that visit mid-western, cen- 
tral, and eastern sections of the United States, but tornadoes in the States are of 
far greater violence than the most destructive storms that occur on the Isthmus. 
A storm of similar type occurred in the vicinity of Gamboa on May 14, 1912, during 
which the high winds did considerable damage at Matachin, and at Bas Obispo. 
No automatic record of the wind velocity was obtained, but from the damage done 
the maximum wind velocity was estimated at 60 miles an hour. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Official Circulars. 



Appointment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 26, 1919. 
Circular No. 661-79: 

Mr. Thomas L. Clear is hereby reinstated as 
Collector of The Panama Canal, effective Sep- 
tember 20, 1919, vice Mr. Elwood P. Sine, resigned. 
Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Accountable Official. 
The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 8, 1919. 
Circular No. 213: 

Effective as of August 19, 1919, Mr. Stanley 
R. Ford, district quartermaster, is designated an 
accountable official, vice Mr. Charles P. Morgan, 
and as such will account for all nonexpendable 
property charged to the district quartermaster at 
Gatun, and for all storehouse stock under his 
charge. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Approved: Auditor, The Panama Canal. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Annual Reports. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 22, 1919. 

To all concerned — In order to facilitate the 
preparation, handling and mailing of future an- 
nual reports of the Governor to the Secretary of 
War, it is directed that all duplicate, triplicate 
and quadruplicate copies of the annual reports 
of all heads of Departments and Divisions of 
The Panama Canal to the Governor shall be 
turned in to the Correspondence Bureau, the 
originals thereof being sent direct to the Governor, 
and that all details connected with the handling 
of this yearly report shall be centered in the 
Correspondence Bureau instead of the Bureau cf 
Statistics, as heretofore. 

The stenographer in the Correspondence Bu- 
reau selected by the Governor to prepare his 
report to the Secretary of War shall be charged 
with the responsibility of all details in connection 
with the handling of this yearly report, such as 
corrections to be made in departmental and di- 
visional reports subsequent to their submission, 
the collection of all photographs, charts and 
diagrams to accompany the Governor's report, 
etc. 

C. A. McIlvainb, 

Approved: Executive Secretary. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 22, 1919. 
Circular No. 214: 

Effective September 12, 1919, Mr. John G. 
Fels is designated an accountable official of 
The Panama Canal, vice Capt. Frederick Kariger, 
and as such will account for all nonexpendable 
property in use by the Lighthouse Sub-Division. 
H. A. A. Smith, 
Approved: Auditor, The Panama Canal. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Appointments. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 29, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective September 6, 1919. 
the following appointments are made: 

Mr. Wilson H. Kromer, Chief Accountant, 
Mr. Frank Bruk, Railroad Accountant, 
Mr. Malcolm L. Duff, Assistant Railroad Ac- 
countant. 

Those having business with these branches of 
the Accounting Department should be governed 
accordingly. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 



Misdirected Letters. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 29, 1919. 

The following insufficiently addressed mail has 
been received in the office of the Director of 
Posts, and may be obtained upon request of the 
addressee. Requests may be made by telephone. 
calling No. 182, Balboa: 



Alexander, Julian 
Baker, Harry D.* 
Beukena, Herman 
Bonum, H. B. 
Carey, Medos J., M. D. 
Dreher, Miss Evlyn 
Earle, Lyon H. 
Erton, Fred 
Guthridge, Morton N. 
Jackson, Mrs. Harold 
Rufus 



Jensen, A. B. 
Lewis, Miss Manne 

Claudius 
Miller, Eugene D. 
Rowland, W. 
Rumler, Jose D. 
Stamatakos, Geo. 
Stevens, Mrs. Janet E.t 
Towler, Mrs. H. H. 
Tuthill, Mrs. Maude A. 



* Special delivery, t Paper. 



Sale of 2-Cylinder Buffalo Marine Gasoline 
Engine. 

Sealed bids will be received in the office of the 
Chief Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, Balboa 
Heights, C. Z., up to 10 a. m., October 6, 1919. 
and. then opened for the purchase of the above 
described engine. Engine is located at Cristobal 
store and will be shown to prospective purchasers 
by the storekeeper at that place any week day 
between the hours of 7 a. m. and 11a. m., and 
1 2 (noon) and 4 p. m. Bids must be accompanied 
by postal money order or certified check in an 
amount not less than 10 per cent of the bid. 
Bidders should make inspection of engine and 
satisfy themselves as to condition. 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Oysters. 

The first shipment of ovsters of the season, 30 barrels, was received ex the steam- 
ship Allianca, 5eptember"25, and distributed to the line stores. 

Books. 

Books received: 

"The Magnificent Ambersons," by Booth Tarkington; 
son; "Modern Japan," by Amos and Susanne Hershey; >,u...c,. ... «~^.~... ^ M ^.,, -., ' -■—- 
Humphrey: "The Yellow Lord." by Will Levington Comfort; "Labrador Days by Wilfred Thoma- 
sonGrenfell; "Abraham Lincoln," by Rose Strunsky; "Irish Fairy and Folk Tales, by W. H.Aeats; 
"The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse," by Blasco Ibafiez; "The Re-Creation of Brian Kent, 
by Harold Bell Wright. 



Far Away and Long Ago," by W. H. Hud- 
Women in American History," by Grace 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1 00 per year; ioreign, SI. 50 address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal. Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 8, 1919. No. 8. 



Distances of Various Ports from the Canal. 

The Panama Canal has issued, and distributed among steam- 
ship lines and allied interests, a small single-sheet folder of distances 
by way of the Canal and representative reductions effected by 
its use. Additional copies may be had free on request to The Panama 
Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or Washington, D. C. 

One item in the folder is the following tabulation of distances 
to the nearest Canal terminal by usual routes from the representative 
ports named; figures are nautical miles, and the length of the Canal' 
is 43 nautical miles: 



Montreal, Can 3,160 

Halifax, N.S 2,317 

Portland, Me 2,108 

Boston, Mass 2,157 

New York, N. Y 1,974 

Philadelphia, Pa 1,046 

Baltimore, Md 1,901 

Norfolk, Va 1,779 

Wilmington, N. C 1,730 

Charleston, S. C 1,564 

Savannah, Ga 1,607 

Jacksonville, Fla 1 ,535 

Key West, Fla 1,065 

Mobile, Ala 1,393 

New Orleans, La 1,403 

Galveston, Tex 1,493 

Tampico, Mexico 1,485 

Tuxpan, Mexico 1,455 

Vera Cruz, Mexico 1 ,420 

Belize, Brit. Honduras. . . 816 
Puerto Barrios, Guatemala 780 

Truxillo, Honduras 622 

Bluefields, Nicaragua 276 

Port Limon, Costa Rica. . 192 
Bocas del Tnro, Panama. 144 

Habana, Cuba 1,003 

Bermuda Islands 1,643 

Kingston, Jamaica 551 

Port au Prince, Haiti 774 

San Juan, Porto Rico 993 

St. Thomas. Virgin Id.... 1,029 
Barbados. West Indies... 1,237 
Port of Spain, Trinidad... 1,159 

Curacao 609 

Cartagena, Colombia 281 

La Guaira, Venezuela. ... 841 
Georgetown, Br. Guiana. . 1 ,535 
Paramaribo, Dtch Guiana 1,648 

Para. Brazil 2,374 

Pernambuco. Brazil 3.458 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 4,349 

Buenos Aires, Argentina.. 5,450 



Ascension Island 4 

St. Helena Island 4 

Cape Town, Africa 6 

Monrovia, Liberia 4 

Freetown, Sierra Leone. . . 3 

St. Vincent, C. V. 1 3 

Funchal, Madeira 3, 

Fayal, Azores 3, 

Gibraltar (Strait) 4, 

Marseilles, France 5 ; 

Genoa, Italy 5, 

Naples, Italy 5, 

Constantinople, Turkey.. . 6 

Odessa, Russia 6. 

Port Said, Egypt 6, 



212 
878 
574 
148 
983 
268 
859 
288 
343 
036 
203 
325 
166 
509 
268 



Lisbon, Portugal . 


. 4,205 


Bordeaux, France 


. 4,598 


Havre, France 


. 4,610 


Bishops Rock, Scilly Is.. 


. 4,356 


Liverpool, Fngland 


. 4,548 


Glasgow, Scotland 


. 4.402 


Plvmouth, England 


. 4,455 


London, England 


. 4,763 


Antwerp, Belgium 


. 4,808 


Amsterdam, Holland. . . . 


. 4,832 


Hamburg, Germany 


. 5,070 


Copenhagen, Denmark. . 


. 5,350 


Christiania, Norway 


. 5,237 


Stockholm, Sweden 


. 5,897 


Petrograd, Russia 


. 6,282 


Bergen. Norway 


. 5,295 


Archangel, Rassia 


. 6,900 



Sitka, Alaska 4,547 

Vancouver, B. C 4,032 

Seattle, Wash 4.021 

Fort Townsend, Wash.... 3,9 5 

Astoria. Oreg 3, 775 

Portland, Oreg 3,869 

San Francisco. Cal 3,245 

Los Angeles, Cal 2.913 

San Diego, Cal 2,843 



Magdalena Bay, Mexico. . 

Mazatlan, Mexico 

Acapulc., Mexico 

Salina ( Iruz, Mexico 

San Jo3e, Guatemala 

La Union, Salvador 

Amapala, Honduras 

Corinto, Nicaragua 

Puntarenas, Cosla Rica.. . 

Pedregal. Panama 

Buenaventura, Colombia. 

Guayaquil. Eouador 

Callao, Peru 

Iquique, Chile 

Antofagasta, Chile 

Valparaiso. Chile 

Coronel, Chile 

Punta Arenas. Chile 

Cape Koru, Chi'e 



Galapagos Islands 

Marquesas Islands 

Christmas Island 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Midway Islands 

Yokohama, Japan 

Vladivostok , Siberia 

Shanghai, China 

Hongkong. Cl.ina 

Manila, P.I 

Singapore, S. S 

Bata.ia, .lava 

Port Apra, Guam 

Caroline Islands tPoaape) 

Marshall Islands 

Fiji Islands (Levuka) 

Samoa (Apia) 

Tahiti, Sonetv Islands.... 

Sydney, Australia 

Melbourne, Australia.... 
Vieilingtou, New Zealand. 



2,265 

2,00ft 

1,426 

1,170 

886 

748 

745 

683 

471 

243 

358 

793 

1,346 

1,778 

2,140 

2,618 

2,822 

3.943 

4,260 

864 
3.826 
4,752 
4 685 
5,707 
7,682 
7.S3S 
8 . 556 
9,195 
9.347 
10.505 
10,610 
7,988 
7,321 
7,041 
6,288 
5,710 
4.486 
7.674 
8,255 
6,505 



Prices of Representative Items in Cold Storage Plant. 

In connection with the description of the cold storage plant and 
abattoir published in this issue, steamship masters and operators wilt 
be interested in the following representative prices, in effect at present 
but subject to change: 

Beef hinds, from Colombian cattle, per pound, S0.18f ; beef fores ? 
per pound, $0.13|; beef ribs, entire set, per pound, $0.20; short loins, 
$0.25; potatoes, per pound, $0.05. ■ 



90 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



91 



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92 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Nitrate Traffic through the Canal. 

Press reports state that the sale of 500,000 tons of nitrate from 
Chilean fields for delivery in Great Britain was made in England 
in the early part of September, and that vessels will be sent from 
Eneland to receive the shipments between October of this year and 
March of 1920 This traffic will normally pass through the Canal, 
which effects a saving of about 3,000 miles in the voyage from ports 
of Great Britain to Iquique or Arica, or about 10 days for a 12-knot 
shin with the advantage of cheaper coal by the Canal route. 

During the current year the nitrate traffic through the Canal 
has declined very noticeably, which is ascribed to lack oi trans- 
portation, the cessation of the war, development of the extraction ot 
nitrogen from the air, and conditions of the market. During the 
time that the United States was in the war the shipments of nitrate 
through the Canal (from April 1, 1917 to November 1, 1918) aggre- 
gated 3,644,443 tons, an average of 191,813 tons per month for the 
19 months. In November, 1918, they amounted to 242,623 tons; 
in December they dropped to 176,288 tons, and the total shipments 
from January 1* to September 1, 1919, have been 192 799 tons, 
on average of 24,100 tons a month, slightly over an eighth of the 
war period average. The following table shows the shipments 
Through the Canal from July 1, 1918, to September 1, 19i9, allow- 
ing as an average that in the instances where nitrate was carried in 
mixed cargoes and not definitely stated, half the cargo may be 
considered as nitrate: 



Month and Year. 



1918. 



July 

August. . . . 
September. 

October 

November. 
December . 



1919. 



January.. 
February. 
March — 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 



Bulk. 



Mixed. 



U.S. 



192,804 

208,514 
195,317 
286,328 
210,055 
168,315 

45,484 
11,234 
19,063 
13.S80 
1,504 
13,341 
13,636 
27, OSS 



Europe. 



41.427 
9,630 



20,050 
17,172 
6,370 

5,731 

""800 
27,050 
11,947 



4,901 



Tota l 11.406,563 j 120,778 



U.S. 



20,860 
22,574 
16,086 

8,303 

21,383 

3,206 

2 242 
4. hi 
10,097 



Europe. 



8,913 
7,060 
12,497 
9,460 



10,867 



109,476 



5,800 
5,511 



3,592 



Total— Bulk and h mixed. 



U.S. 



203,234 
21 9, S01 
203,360 
290,479 
220,721 
169,918 

46,605 
13,621 
24,111 
13.S80 
1,504 
13,341 
13,636 
2 7, OSS 



Europe. 



41,427 
14,280 

3,530 
26,298 
21,902 

6,370 

5,731 
5.433 
S00 
5,650 
14,702 



6,697 



1,461,299 152,826 



Total. 



244,661 
234,087 
206,980 
316,777 
242 , 623 
176,238 

52,336 
19,064 
24,911 
19,530 
16,206 
13,341 
20,333 
27,088 



1,614,125 



From the opening of the Canal to April 1, 1917, the nitrate ship- 
ents aggregated 3,208,700 tons, and from April 1, 1917, to September 



ments aggreg 



1 1919 they amounted to 4,256,163 tons, making the aggregate to 
the latter date, 7,464,863 tons, slightly over one-iourth of all the 
cargo which had passed through the Canal. 



Notice to Mariners. -Light Extinguished, Serrana Eank, Caribbean Sea. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 4, 1919. 
Circular No. 643-66: 

Serrana Bank Light is reported out at present for some unknown reason. 

It will be investigated and relighted as soon as practicable. 

L^ht— white, flashing, 0.5 second light, 4.5 seconds dark. 

Latitude 14° 16' 40" north. 

Longitude 80° 23' 50" west. Chester ^^ 

Governor. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 93 

New Cold Storage Plant and Abattoir. 

The cold storage plant and abattoir unit at Mount Hope, adjoining 
Cristobal, at the Atlantic entrance to the Canal, has been placed in 
practically complete operation. The services which the new plant has 
rendered in the past few months have demonstrated its fitness and have 
served to suggest at the same time a few minor changes of internal 
arrangement which will increase its efficiency. It has shown itself to 
be a valuable adjunct in the service of supplying foodstuffs to the 
steamships at the Canal, as well as to the Government forces stationed 
here. 

In the handling of cattle, the force at the abattoir has been able to 
kill and dress 200 beeves, preparatory to chilling, in a working day of 
eight hours. This is at the rate of 25 an hour, or one every 2 minutes 
and 40 seconds. At an average of 500 pounds per dressed carcass, the 
daily output of beef products would be 100,000 pounds, or 50 tons. 
In addition, 200 hogs and 600 chickens may be killed in a day. The 
storage rooms in the adjoining building will ordinarily hold 4,815 beef 
carcasses hanging in halves, or 2,957 head if hung in quarters, and 
these capacities can be increased if necessary by stacking the beef 
instead of hanging it. 

The unit contains three main buildings, each three stories in height, 
the cold storage building, abattoir, and a meat cannery, now used 
as a storage for canned goods. The refrigerating and ice plant is 
housed in a separate building adjoining the cold storage building, and 
across a concrete road from this and the main buildings is a garage, 
which serves also as a charging station for the electric trucks used 
about the plant, and a building which houses the steam plant, with a 
machine and tin shop at one end and a carpenter shop at the other. 
Cattle pens adjoin the abattoir. 

The plant covers slightly over four acres, and its cost to Septem- 
ber 1, 1919, was approximately $1,491,500. 

The construction is of reinforced concrete columns, beams, and 
floor slabs, with filled-in block walls. The roofs are of flat slabs, made 
waterproof by eliminating temperature cracks with | per cent of rein- 
forcing steel. Floors, walls, and ceiling are lined with 4-inch, 6-inch, 
or 9-inch thickness of cork where low temperatures are required. The 
ice cream rooms and those devoted to storage and handling of dairy 
products are floored with red ceramic tile. 

ABATTOIR. 

The abattoir is 95 by 134 feet in plan, and three stories in height. 

The live stock is driven up from the stockyards over a 6-foot wide 
exterior concrete runway to the third floor, where all killing is done. 
Provision has been made for slaughtering as high as 300 cattle per day 
on six killing beds, with allowance for installation of a seventh bed, 
and 600 hogs per day, with capacity for further expansion. A dehair- 
ing machine with a capacity of 200 per hour has been installed. 
The dressed beef and hogs are run upon overhead rails across a bridge 
and directly into the chill rooms of the cold storage plant. 

All offal and by-products from the killing floor are dropped through 
chutes and delivered by gravity to the floor below, where they are cleaned 
and sent to the proper department. On this floor are also located the 
bone room, the upper part of the tank house, and the upper part of the 
lard and oleo oil department. 



94 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

The tank house, which extends to the basement, is equipped with 
six rendering tanks, two blood cookers, an evaporator, and a press from 
which the tankage is conveyed by trucks to the fertilizer plant and 
the grease in barrels for transportation to the United States. 

The lard and oleo department, extending through the first and 
second floor, is provided with machinery required for the manufacture 
of steam lard, open-kettle lard, oleo oil and stearine, together with the 
cold room for storage of the finished products. 

A small poultry-killing space has been provided on the first floor 
where 600 chickens, ducks, etc., may be killed daily. 

The remainder of the first floor is occupied by the hide department. 
The hides are dropped direct from the killing floor, after which they 
are salted and stored in salt vats, which have a storage capacity 
of 6,000 hides. 

The building occupies a convenient location with respect to the cold 
storage building, boiler house, and repair shops, and is reached by a 
road on the east side and by railroad tracks on the west. 
COLD STORAGE BUILDING. 

The visitor to the cold storage plant is struck by the novelty of zero 
temperature in the tropics, and snow at an elevation of 10 feet above 
sea level at a latitude of nine degrees from the equator. The refrigerat- 
ing pipes become in time so encrusted with snow that it is necessary 
to remove it. The pipes are flushed with a hot gas and the melting 
snow drops to the floor, from which it is picked up in scoops and carted 
away. It is one of the few waste products of the plant. 

Nearly half of the storage space is devoted to beef, which is killed 
in the adjacent abattoir and transferred to the chill and storage rooms 
on overhead tracks. Space is provided for refrigeration of over 5,000 
carcasses of beef, consisting of: 

Two chill rooms with a capacity of 200 carcasses each; four coolers 
with a hanging capacity of 4,815 carcasses (9,630 sides) ; three freezers 
in which quarters of beef are stacked, having a capacity of 8,064 quar- 
ters, or 2,016 carcasses. 

Over 50,000 square feet of floor space, or 688,780 cubic feet, are 
devoted to storage of various classes, as follows: 



Storage. 


Square 
feet. 


Cubic 
feet. 


Be?f 


20,710 
4,705 
1,110 
4,440 
2,254 

17,670 


333,100 




53,400 


Butter 


12,130 




72,500 




24,650 




193,000 








Total 


50,88!) 


688,780 



The cold storage building has three floors. The first story is 341 
feet 3 inches in length, overall, by 115 feet 8 inches in width, and the 
two stories above, having the same length, are 105 feet 8 inches wide. 

On the third floor of the building are rooms, with necessary equip- 
ment, for corning beef, for making sausage and hamburger, and for 
pickling meat. On the first floor are an ice cream manufacturing plant, 
with rooms for freezing, hardening, brick cutting, storage, etc., and 
the milk bottling plant, where milk is pasteurized and bottled. The 
remainder of the third and first floors and all of the second floor are 
devoted to storage rooms, with necessary small allowances of space for 
the three electric elevators, each 6 by 10 feet, and for office room. The 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



95 



beef storage is mostly on the third floor and shipping rooms are on the 
first floor; the distribution of spaces throughout the building is shown 
in this tabulation: 

FIRST FLOOR. 



No 



Name of Room. 



Length. 



Width. Height. 





Tem- 


Cubic feet. 


perature, 




degrees F. 


178,000 


45° 


14,800 


10" 


9,780 


10° 


6,450 


20° 


12,150 


5° 


8,279 


0° 


26,180 


45° 


5,690 


26°— 30° 


5,150 


45° 


3,960 


20° 


1,695 


32° 


16,300 


40° 


13,550 


18° 


29,600 


18° 


27,800 


18° 




45° 




0° 
20* 
40° 




9,090 




0° 
0° 


1,650 


27,000 


28° 



Kind of 
refrigeration. 



100 



101 

102 
103 
104 
105 

106 

107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
125 
126 



Corridors. 



Box goods freezer 

Box goods freezer 

Box goods freezer 

Box goods freezer 

Box goods freezer 

Packing room < 

Livers, tongues, and hearts 

Saw room 

Scrap room 

Butcher 

Cutting 

Meat cooler 

Meat cooler .*. . 

Meat cooler 

Packing 

Hardening room 

Ante room 

Brick cutting 

Hardening room 

Finished product 

Ice storage 



330' 
330' 
74' 
74' 
34' 
41' 
II' 

34' 6" 
66' 10' 
39' 

27' 6" 
73' 
11' 

27' 6" 
27' 6" 
24' 6" 
14' 3" 
36' 3" 
72' 6" 
72' 6" 
72' 6" 
40' 6" 
21' 

17' 1" 
IS' 4" 
21' 
12' 
83' 



14' 8" 
15' 6" 
15' 3" 
10' 

34' 6" 
10' 
25' 

8' 6" 
27' 6" 
26' 7" 
33' 

9' 
18*3" 
16' 6" 
14' 3" 
10' 6" 
29' 8" 
16' 6" 
36' 
35' 
39' 

8' 

7' 
14' 10" 
8' 

12' 6" 
34' 6" 



11' 4" 



11' 4" 

11' 4" 
11' 4" 

ir 4" 

11' 4" 
11' 4" 

11' 4" 

ir 4" 

11' 4" 
11' 4" 
11' 4" 
11' 4" 
11' 4" 
11'4" 
11' 4" 
11' 4" 
11' 4" 
11' 4" 
11' 4" 
11' 4" 



Brine spray 



Direct expansion 

Direct expansion 
Direct expansion 
Direct expansion 
Direct expansion 

Fan system 

Direct expansion 

Brine 

Direct expansion 

Direct expansion 

Fan system 

Direct expansion 

Direct expansion 

Direct expansion 

Brine 

Direct expansion 

Direct expansion 
Direst expansion 
Direct expansion 
Direct expansion 



SECOND FLOOR. 



200 
205 



200 



207 

208 
209 
210 
211 



214 
215 
216 
217 
219 
220 
223 



Corridor. 
Onions. . 



Vegetable storage. 



Vegetable storage 

Cheese 

Egg packing 

Ventilating system 

Egg storage 

Salt cured meat 

Butter cutting 

Oleomargarine and butter. 

Milk storage 

Tempering room 

Bunker room , 

Extract 

Bunker 



297' 6' 
48' 1' 



87' 
30' 
11' 

87' 
21' 
l!i' 
18' 
34' 
39' 
48' 
24' 
11' 
21' 
30' 
29' 
28' 

21' 
Hi' 
21' 



14' 6" 
14' 4" 

85' 2" 
15' 
10' 

S5' 2" 
54' 

9' 
17' 1" 
17' 1" 
18' 8" 
34' 4" 
15' 

6' 
15' 3" 
24'. i'/ 

28' 2" 
13' 4" 

8' 

6' 8" 



10' 101" 
10' 101" 



10' 10J' 



10' 101" 



101" 
101" 
101" 
101" 
101" 
10^" 
101" 
101" 
10J" 
lOi" 
101" 
101" 
lOi" 



46,800 
7,480 



82,750 



95,500 

3,465 
6,300 
8,100 
17,900 
4,700 

4,020 
7,820 
8,800 
4,070 

(a) 



45° 
36°— 38° 



36°— 38 c 



36°— 38° 



32°— 38° 
38°-40° 

58° 
10° 
32° 
40° 

(a) 



Brine spray 
Direct expansion 



Fan system 



Fan system 

Direct expansion 
Brine 



Direct expansion 
Brine 

Brine 

Direct expansion 
Direct expansion 
Direct expansion 

(a) 



(a) Included in ice cream. 



THIRD FLOOR. 



300 



303 
304 

305 

306 
307 
30S 

309 
310 
311 
312 



Corridor 

Sausage cutting. 
Sausage cooker. . 
Pickling room. . . 
Meat cooler 



Meat cooler. 
Meat cooler. 
Meat cooler. 
Meat cooler. 
Meat cooler. 
Meat cooler. 
Chill room. . 
Chill room. . 
Chill room. .. 
Chill room. . 



227' 6" 
52' 6" 


14' 6" 

6' 


14' 6" 

18' 6" 


] 53,630 


37' 


17' 


14' 6" 


9,125 


25'10" 


15' 7" 


14' 6" 


5,840 


50'10S" 


33' 3" 


14' 6" 


24,500 


88' 5" 


18' 1" 






10' 


7' 


14' 6" 


24,200 


11' 


10' 






88' 5" 


34' 4" 


14' 6" 


43,300 


SS' 5" 


51'10" 


14' 6" 


66,500 


88' 5" 


51'10" 


14' 6" 


66,500 


SS' 5" 


51'10" 


14' 6" 


65,000 


11' 


11' 






45' 4" 


25' 3" 


IS' 6" 


21,160 


45' 4" 


25' 3" 


18' 6" 


21,160 


45' 4" 


26' 3" 


IS' 6" 


22,000 


45' 4" 


26' 3" 


18' 6" 


22,000 



45° 

3S° 
33° 
38° 

18° 

1S° 
18° 
18° 
18° 

36<>—4S 
30°— 36° 
36°— 48° 
30°— 36° 



Brine spray 

Brine spray 
Direct, expansion* 
Brine spray 

Direct expansion. 

Direct expansion 
Direct expansion 
Direct expansion 
Direct expansion 



Brine spray 



Ice manufacturing plant — This structure adjoins the cold storage 
building and is connected with it by a 30-foot platform. Three 



96 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

50-ton freezing tanks with necessary agitators, air blowers, filters, 
tipping tables, precoolers, and dipping tanks are located in the tank 
room. 

Raw water ice is manufactured in 300-pound cakes, and three over- 
head cranes, one for each tank, are provided for handling the ice. The 
plant is^ now supplying the north end of the Canal Zone. The ice 
plant at Balboa supplies the south end. 

Engine room — The engine room equipment consists of three 200-ton 
high speed York single-action vertical condensed ammonia compres- 
sors, directly connected to 400-horse power motors. One pump-out 
machine is provided. Four vertical centrifugal pumps of 1,000 gal- 
lons-per-minute capacity are located in a sump under the engine 
room, directly connected to vertical motors located on the main floor 
of the engine room. Salt water is furnished to this sump from the 
East Diversion by gravity through a 24-inch concrete pipe, 3,900 feet 
Jong, and is pumped to double tube condensers on the roof of the 
freezing room. Fresh water is furnished from Brazos Brook Reser- 
voir. 

A 20-ton overhead electric crane is provided, covering the entire area 
©f the engine room. 

The main electrical switchboard, transformers, and distribution 
system are located along one side of this room. 

An idea of the producing work of the plant may be gained from the 
following comparative statement of output of the several plants during 
the five fiscal years, 1915 to 1919. In the last column is shown the 
average daily production for each of the 304 working days of the fiscal 
year 1919. These figures do not show the ultimate capacity of the 
new plant, and it was not until toward the end of the fiscal year 1919, 
(June 30), that it was in use: 

(For statement referred to, see page 97.) 

The new cold storage plant was used for the first time on February 
25, 1919, when 300 sides of beef were put into the chill rooms. Two 
rendering tanks, each with a daily capacity of 9,000 pounds of offal, 
were placed in operation on February 26. The first hides were put down 
three days later and by the middle of March practically all the beef 
storage was in use. With the transfer of the butter, cheese, egg, and 
vegetable sections on May 18, the new cold storage plant proper 
was in complete operation. 

At the end of June, 1919, the plant was full almost to capacity, there 
being 3,61 1 carcasses hanging, 8, 159quarters wrapped ready for export, 
and 2,009 quarters unwrapped. This was due to the fact that the kill 
had been for some time maintained at the rate of 200 cattle daily and 
shipments on a contract with the Depot Quartermaster, United States 
Army, New York, were suspended on very short notice. As soon as 
this advice was received from the Army, the kill was reduced to 
approximately 100 cattle daily. 

The facilities at the new abattoir are a great improvement over those 
at the old slaughterhouse, where the employees worked in such con- 
gested quarters that, when the kill reached 200 cattle per day, it was 
necessary to work two shifts. Located immediately contiguous to the 
cold storage, it is much more convenient for all concerned and time 
and labor are saved. After slaughtering, the halved carcasses are 
transferred by conveyor track to the chill room, thus obviating the 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



97 



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98 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



necessity of the car formerly used for conveying from the old abattoir 
to cold storage. 

The plant was designed by Canal engineers, in cooperation with 
officials of the Commissary Division, and is a development to meet local 
conditions, using at the same time the equipment and lay-out of modern 
plants in the United States. 

The meat-canning factory, a three-story building 103 feet 4 inches 
long by 87 feet 8 inches in width, has been completed as far as build- 
ing operations are concerned, but the canning machinery has not 
been installed. The building is now used as a storage for canned 
goods. 

The accompanying plan shows the layout of the completed build- 
ings and also the site adjoining on which it is proposed to erect a 
large building of the same general type of construction, to serve as a 
laundry, warehouse, and bakery. 




GRAPHIC 5CAL& 



LAYOUT OF COLD STORAGE, ICE PLANT, AND ABATTOIR OPERATED BY THE PANAMA CANAL AT ATLANTIC 

TERMINUS. 



Tolls in September. 

Tolls paid by commercial ships passing through the Canal in 
September aggregated $588,993.99, of which $264,114.90 was paid 
by vessels from Atlantic to Pacific and $324,879.09 by those going 
from Pacific to Atlantic; the number of the former was 73 and of the 
latter, 101. (The average per ship was $3,385.02.) The total tolls 
were $20,452.97 less than in Ausust. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



99 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending October 4, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Line or charterer. 



Arrived. 



Departed. 



Cargo — 



Discharged Laded. 



Newport 

Middlebury 

Balboa 

Palena 

Lake \\ ilson 

Cartago 

Kilpatrick 

Fairhaven '. 

San Jose 

Gen. \V. C. Gorgas. 

Ulysses 

Oauca 

Santa Leonora 

Allianca 

Santa Malta 

Chile 

Santa Marta 

Ucayali 

Coppename.' 

Colen 

Acajutla 

Jamaica 

Zacapa 

Alexandrian 

Advance 

S. M. Spalding 



Pacific Mail Steam-hip Line 

Panama Railroad Commissary.... 
Terminal Shipping Agency 

United Fruit Company 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

United Fruit Company 

United States Government 

Anglo-American S. S. Agency 

Pacific Mail Steam-hip Line 

Panama Railroad Steamship Lim 
Panama Railroad Steam-hip Line. 
Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United States Government 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

United States Government 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

I'niieii Fruit Company 

Peruvian Steamship Company.. . . 

United Fruit Company 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United Fruit Company 

Leyland Line 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 
Anelo-American S. S. Aeen iv.. . 



September 28 
September 28 



September 28' 



Tons. 



September 29 



September 30 
September 30 

September 30. 
September 30. 



September 29 
September 29 
September 30 
September 30 
Septemb r 30 
September 30. 



500 
704 



Tons. 
1,071 



October 3. 



i Ictober 1. 

October 1. 

October I. 



October 1. 



1,250 

12.102! 

1,190 

460 



620 
2,295 

424 
33 

935 
1,822 



October 2. 
October 2. 

October 2. 
October 2. 
October 3. 
October 3. 



October 2. 
October 2. 
October 2. 
October 2. 



1,065 

1 , 553 

928 



1,769 



October 3. 



806 

352 

68 

653 

1,916 

10.000 



50 
773} 
113 
3,479 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending October 4, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo- 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 


Newport 


Pacific Mail Steamship Co 


September 28. 
September 28 . 
Septemher 30. 
September 30. 

October 1 

October 2 
October 2 . ... 
October 2 


September 28 . 
September 28. 


Tons. 
90 
50 


Tons. 
47 




Pacific Mail Steamship Co 

Pacific Steam \a\ igation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United States SI ipping Board 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United States Shinning Board 


1 




September 30 . 
October 1. 
October 2. 
October 2 
October 3. 


4 

22 

805 

1 

7 
1.679 




Chile 






Acajutla 











Manifests of Cargo. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 29, 1919. 
Circular No. 679-9: 

1. Circular No. 695-5, of December 13, 1918, requiring each vessel transiting the 
Canal to furnish to the boarding officer a full manifest of the cargo on such vessel, 
and each vessel entering a Canal Zone port to furnish an additional copy of its mani- 
fest, for statistical purposes, is canceled. 

2. Present requirements are t hat t hree copies of the manifest be submitted by each 
ship handling cargo in the terminal ports of the Canal, and that the cargo declaration 
form, No. 4363, be submitted by vessels making the transit of the Canal, but not 
handling cargo at the terminal ports. For the convenience of such vessels, however, 
a manifest will be accepted in place of the cargo declaration at the option of the ship's 
master. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Contract for 1,000,000 Barrels of Fuel Oil. 

Contract has been made with The Panama Canal by the West 
India Oil Company for the delivery by the latter of 1,000,000 barrels 
of fuel oil to the tanks of the Canal, June 30, 1920. Three hundred 
thousand barrels are to be delivered at Cristobal, at $1.12 per barrel 
and 700,000 at Balboa at Si. 29 per barrel. The oil is to be purchased 
on the basis of 42 gallons to the barrel at 60° F. 



100 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Toll Charges in Connection with Double Bottom Spaces. 

Under the present method of assessing tolls on loaded merchant 
vessels, other than oil tankers, transiting the Panama Canal, spaces 
in cellular double bottoms are, in effect, not charged for even when such 
spaces are used to carry fuel oil, boiler feed water, drinking water, or 
cargo, when the Panama Canal net tonnage times $1.20 exceeds the 
United States net tonnage times $1.25. 

} Oil tank steamers are charged oh such spaces when used for other 
than water ballast. 

| Merchant vessels, when in ballast, are charged on such spaces if 
used for other than water ballast. 



Seventy-four Days from the Fiji Islands. 

The 4-masted schooner Ludlow arrived at Balboa fromLevuka, Fiji 
Islands, on September 28, for passage through the Canal, carrying a 
cargo of 799 tons of copra in bulk for Norfolk. The schooner was 74 
days in making the voyage from Levuka. She is 185 feet in length 
by 39 foot beam, and carries a crew of 10 men. She laid up at Balboa 
for repairs, and is there now. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal 
postomces, and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights (telephone 286): 

Surveillance inspector (male); $1,600 to $2,400 a year; No. 469; October 28, 1919; form 1312; 
age, not under 21 years.* 

' Teacher (Indian Service) (male and female); $600 to $720 a year; No. 148-amended; October 22, 
November 19, and December 10, 1919; form 1312; age, at least 20 years but under .SO years. 

Automobile mechanic (male) ; $l,000ayear; No. 482; October 23, 1919; form 1800; age.atleast 18 
years.* 

Matron; $500 to $720 a year; No. 152-amended; October 22, November 19, and December 10, 
1919; form 304; age, at least 21 years, but under 48 years. 

Domestic science teacher (female); $720 a year; No. 258-amended; October 22, November 19, and 
December 10, 1919; form 1312; age, at least 22 years hut under 50 years. 

Calculating machine operator (male and female); $900 to SI, 200 a year; No. 32-amended; October 
2, November 19, and December 10, 1919; form 304; age, at least 18 years. 

Operative (male and female); $900 to $1,000 a year; No. 32-amended; October 22, November 19, 
and December 10, 1919; form 304; age, at least 18 years. 

♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by- 


Date of death. 


Samuel Friedman .... 


923 

26788 

40867 


United States. . . 
United States. . . 

Jamaica 


Gatun, C. Z.... 
Cristobal 

Colon 


Accounting Department 
Mechanical Division . . . 

Electrical Division 


Sontember 30, 1919. 
September 18, 1919. 


James Muir (Muire or 
Mure) 


September 21.1 91 9 



Police Census of the Canal Zone. 

The Police and Fire Division has issued a summary of a house- 
to-house canvass of civil inhabitants of the Canal Zone, taken between 
August 20 and 31, 1919. The total civil population was found to be 
21,759, an increase of 52 persons from the 21,707 enumerated be- 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



101 



tween June 20 and 30, 1918. The results of that canvass were pub- 
lished in The Panama Canal Record of July 24, 1918. In the Balboa 
district there was an increase of 44 persons, to a total of 14,056, and 
in the Cristobal district an increase of 62, to a total of 7,586; the 
prisoners, counted separately, decreased from 171 to 117, a change of 
54. In connection with the canvass, an enumeration was made of 
people living outside the Canal Zone on the shores of Gatun Lake and 
dependent on the lake for transportation; these showed an increase 
of 616, to a new total of 2,979. The detailed figures of the enumeration 
follow: 

BALBOA DISTRICT. 





Americans. 


All others. 


Americans. 


All others. 




Location. 


1 
Total 
men. 


tC_c 

P. 


Total 
men. 

180 

46 
377 


if 

180 

46 
158 


Total 
wom- 
en. 


K o 

c 


Chil- 
dren. 


Total 
wom- 
en. 


e o 
■3, 


Chil- 
dren. 


Total. 




507 

20 

169 

19 


503 

20 
30 


162 

60 
8 
11 


76 

60 
2 


241 


74 




20 


1,184 


Ancon Hospital. 
Staff 


126 


Patients (civilians only) . . 
Tivoli Hotel 


9 

5 


75 
2 

3 

48 
155 

1 

426 

3 


3 

2 


17 
4 


646 
37 


Rural (on east side of Canal be- 
tween boundary line and Car- 


5 
24 
145 


5 
24 
94 


12 




171 

967 

3 

54 
9 
3 

1 


168 
953 


252 

664 

3 

59 
2 


143 
52 

1 


192 

863 

3 

67 
2 


687 






37 


2,831 




10 




54 
5 
3 

1 


895 
23 
34 

16 
48 

1 

2 

70 
28 

156 
222 


895 
16 
23 

16 




874 


2,375 




39 








37 


PALO SBCO 

Staff 


1 




3 


6 
17 


2 


8 


27 




73 








1 








1 


Rural (on west side of Canal be- 
tween Pacific shore and Arrai- 












1 




5 


8 








70 
24 

156 








70 




8 

16 

4 

11 

226 


3 
16 

11 

222 


5 
8 


8 


5 

8 


28 

15 

168 

2 

14 

4 

385 

1 


15 


4 


78 


Corozal Asylum. 

Staff 


203 




394 
















13 




23 

6 

571 

1 


23 

6 

564 

1 


157 


14 


159 






579 






3 
647 

1 


13 














1,603 


Rural Con east side of Canal be- 
tween Cardenas River and 


1 


1 


1 






5 












5 


5 

3 
5 


478 

8 

24 

82 


468 

8 
24 
81 


4 


2 


8 


283 




570 


1,348 




8 




3 
5 














27 




1 




2 


15 




28 


133 












8 

7 

4 
15 










1 




2 


11 
















7 


gambol (south of Cliagres River) 
Ganiboa stockade. 


2 

5 

1 


2 

5 
1 


77 

4 
15 








42 




67 


188 








'9 










2 




1 


19 














7 


6 


18 
9ft 
156 
64 
28 


2 
25 
63 
17 


7 




4 


1 

88 
106 
63 






37 






127 
186 
150 


314 




3 


1 


3 


1 


3 


'[457 




277 














28 
























2 


2 


136 
4 


136 














H 138 


Rural (on west side ot Canal be- 
tween Arraijan trail and Gatun 
Lake) 














4 
























j, . J ■ ■ s 




















































2.027 


4.081 


3,222 


1,408 


359 






22 


2. 751 


5.630 


Total oersons 


2.213 


1,574 


2,029 


14,056 



102 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



CRISTOBAL DISTRICT. 





Americans. 


All others. 


Americans. 


.All others. 




Location. 


Total 
men. 


K o 
C. 


Total 
men. 


"3. 


Total 
wom- 
en. 


Cd o 

"S 


Chil- 
dren. 


Total 
wom- 
en. 


"2. 


Chil- 
dren. 


Total. 




10 


10 






4 




5 


2 






21 
















1 


1 


30 


30 








3 




1 


35 


Rural (on east side of Canal be- 
tween Chagres River and Rio 
















7 
17 
24 
19 

8 
43 

2 

20S 

55 

527 

2 

7 

6 

4S 
6 

24 

39 

387 

1,711 

17 

1 
2 


7 

17 
24 
19 

8 
42 

2 

203 

55 

496 

2 

7 
48 

24 

36 

381 

1,711 

17 

1 

2 








2 
5 
10 






9 




1 
1 


1 
1 


1 








3 
12 


27 








47 










19 




















8 




4 


3 


1 




o 


20 

1 

170 




23 


93 




3 




183 


180 


161 


5 


224 




261 


1,207 




55 




1 


1 


1 




1 


300 
1 

4 

28 
2 
2 

13 

9 

341 

35 
3 


1 
" " 4 " 


437 

2 

3 

6 
2 
2 

11 

1 

783 

66 


1,267 




5 


Rural (on east side ot Canal be- 
tween north shore of Gatun 


1 

1 
1 
15 

4 

693 

I 


1 

1 
12 

4 

679 

1 


1 

1 

1 

10 

2 
240 






16 


France Field, Coco Solo and Ft. 




1 
5 
26 


43 




59 




^ 61 


Mt. Hope pastures (including 
hog farm and Manjagual 


54 




31 


221 


1,203 




1,512 










1,812 














20 


















1 














2 




5 


9 














895 


3,190 


3,132 


423 


36 






5 


1.618 


4,008 


Total persons 


917 


485 


953 


7,586 



PRISONERS. 





4 




17 
3 

20 
1 

30 
3 

25 








1 






22 
















3 




3 


















29 


















1 




2 


















32 


















3 




2 


















27 




















Total persons 


11 




105 




1 




1 






117 



RECAPITULATION. 







2,027 




3,222 
3,132 


1,408 
423 


395 
36 






22 
5 


2,751 

1,618 


5,630 




2,213 


4.081 


1,574 


2,029 


14,056 




895 


3,190 
'105 


4,068 




917 
11 


485 


953 
1 


7,586 




117 






















2,922 


7, 376 


6,354 


1,831 


395 






27 


4,369 


9,698 


Total persons 


8.141 


2,059 


2,983 


21,759 



POPULATION OF THE GATUN LAKE AREA (OUTSIDE THE CANAL ZONE), WHO ARE DEPENDENT 
ON GATUN LAKE FOR TRANSPORTATION. 








— _ 


83 

38 

40 

107 

166 

12S 

74 

177 

243 

28 

18 


5 








66 

21 

29 

44 

99 

109 

38 

152 

138 

14 

7 




89 
28 
35 

68 
180 
180 

62 
243 
220 

17 

13 


238 














87 
















104 


CANO QFJEBR ADA 


1 
2 
3 


i 

i 


11 

1 








220 








447 




3 




1 


424 




174 




3 
3 


2 
1 


9 
15 


i 

2 




1 

3 


577 




609 




59 




1 






1 






40 














5 


1.102 


41 














46 


Total persons 


13 


" 




5 


717 




1,135 


2,979 



rosuu and Cable Addresses ot The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," or "The Panama 
Canal. Washington, D. C." 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama": in the 
United States. "Pancanal, Washington." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



103 



Official Circulars. 



Appointment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 30, 1919. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Effective October 1, 1919, Mr. R. W. Glaw is 
designated Paymaster, The Panama Canal, and 
wiM serve during the absence of Mr. J. H. McLean. 
Chester Harding. 
Governor. 



Transportation. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., October 1. 1919. 
Circular No. 65S-6: 

Paragraph 17 of Circular No. 658-4, dated No- 
vember 24, 1916, is amended to read as follows, 
effective October 1, 1919: 

17. Reimbursement for cab, jitney or street 
car fares will be allowed when it is necessary for 
an employee to use such transportation in the 
performance of official duties assigned to him by 
proper authority. The trips must be itemized in- 
cluding date, starting point and destination, when 
submitting voucher for reimbursement. When 
available, regular bus or street car must be used. 
Fares in excess of those charged on bus or street 
car lines, when the points between which the 
travel is performed are convenient to such lines, 
Tvill'require specific explanation. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Official Correspondence. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 30, 1919. 
Circular No. 616-1 : 

1. Employees must not take any action either 
by correspondence with or a visit to a contractor 
or prospective contractor for material or supplies 
for The Panama Canal, which could in any way 
be construed to be official or authoritative, unless 
such employees have been specially authorized 
to so represent The Panama Canal. 

2. If it is desirable to give or to receive informa- 
tion regarding any Panama Canal contract or 
prospective contract in the United States, the 
employee may, if on the Isthmus, address the 
Chief Quartermaster; if in the United States, 
address the General Purchasing Officer, The Pana- 
ma Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Photographs and Blue Prints. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 1, 1919. 
Circular No. 617-2: 

Paragraph 3, of Circular No. 617-1, dated 
March 15, 1916, is amended to read as follows: 
3. Copies of tracings in blue or white prints 
will be sold at 5 cents per square foot, and brown 
prints (vandyke negatives) at 10 cents per square 
foot, regardless of the size of the drawing. 
When the tracing is furnished by the person de- 
siring prints, the rate will be 3 cents per square 
foot for blue or white prints, and 7 cents per 
square foot for brown prints. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Sale of Universal Marine Gas Engine. 

Sealed bids will be received in the office of the 
Chief Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, Balboa 
Heights. C. Z., up to 10 a. m., October 11, and 
then opened for the purchase of the above- 



mentioned engine. This is a 12-horsepower, high 
speed engine, with magneto and reverse gear, rear 
starter, propeller and shaft, muffler, etc. Same 
will be shown to prospective purchasers by the 
Storekeeper, Cristobal, any week day between 
the hours of 7 and 11 a. m. and 12 noon and 4 
p. m. Bid should be accompanied by postal money 
order or certified check in an amount not less 
than 10 per cent of the amount bid. The Panama 
Canal reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 



Rainfall from Sept. 1 to 30, 1919, Inclusive. 



Stations. 


.a 

2 =8 

°» S 


a) 

Q 


o 


Pacific uciion — 


Int. 
3.50 
2.17 
2.58 
1.51 
1.44 
2.15 

2.40 
3.60 
2.21 
1.80 
2.73 
1.88 
2.68 
1.50 
1.96 
3.96 

2.25 
3.60 
2.22 


23 
24 
24 

3 
8 

1 

1 

1 

1 

21 

19 

26 

1 

7&21 

11 

8 

22 

8 
4 


Ins. 
9 25 


Balboa 


8 46 


Balboa Heights 


10.84 


Miraflores 


8 33 


Pedro Miguel 


9.3S 


Rio Grande 


10 89 


Central tection — 
•Culebra 


11 73 




12 21 




11 04 




9 39 


•Juan Mina 


13.85 


Alhajuela 


9 35 




11 96 


*Darien 


12 73 


•Trinidad 

•Monte Lirio 


8.44 
15 48 


Atlantic section — 


8 42 




10 55 


Colon 


11 74 


JBocasdel Toro 




•Porto Bello 


2.45 


7 


14.37 



♦Standard rain gauge— readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gauge at unstarred stations — values, 
midnight to midnight. 
{Standard rain gauge — readings at 8 a. m. daily. 



September Rainfall for Three Years. 



Statioia. 



Pacific section — 

Balboa 

Balboa Heights 

Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel . . 

Rio Grande 

Central section — 

Culebra 

Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

Juan Mina. . . . 

Alhajuela 

Vigia 

Prijoles 

Trinidad 

Monte Lirio . . . 
Atlantic section- 

Gatun 

Brazos Brook. . 

Colon 




11.73 
12.21 
11.04 

9.39 
13.85 141.53 

9.35 11.07 
11.96 113.24 



13 50 
8.44 
15.48 


12.87 

9.C4 

12.10 


8.42 
10.55 
11.74 


7.27 
13.79 
15.34 



12.20 
13.31 
17.67 



104 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Live Stock on Pastures and Farms. 

At the beginning of October, the Cattle Industry had on hand 
in the Canal Zone pastures, fattening for slaughter, 12,430 beef 
cattle, classified as follows: Fat steers, 4,769; 4- year olds, 7,375; 
3-year olds, 161 ; 2-year olds, 41 ; and 1-year olds, 84. The breeding 
stock, in addition to the foregoing, contained 1,155 head, and the 
dairy stock, 1,083 head, of which 85 are Holstein cows. 

Stock on the hog farms consisted of 731 pigs, 937 shoats, 155 hogs, 
790 sows, 13 boars, and 110 goats. 

Stock at the poultry farm included 11 chicks, 2,048 chickens, and 
49 turkeys. 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Voile. 

The Commissary purchasing agent has written that the market is practically 
bare of low-priced voile and any acceptable quality is commanding a good figure 
at present. 

Straw Hats. 

Inquiries recently made failed to locate an inexpensive grade of straw hat being 
manufactured in the United States. From all indications the day of the cheap straw- 
hat is at an end. 



Oysters. 

Another shipment of oysters, consisting of 25 barrels, was received on the steam- 
ship Advance. They are, for the most part, large in size and were received in excellent 
condition. All line stores now have them for sale. 

Oil Stoves. 

A shipment of "Florence Way" oil cook stoves, 2 burner and 4-burner, was dis- 
tributed to the line stores Saturday. These have been in large request among com- 
missary patrons. 

Shirts. 

Advice from New York states that men's negligee shirts have reached a high- 
mark in price. It is said to be hard to find a retail store selling a shirt of any quality 
at less than $2. 

Pottery. 

A further increase of 10 per cent in price is announced by the Royal Doulton 
Potteries. It is stated that the recent increase in the cost of fuel added to the con- 
siderable advance given their work people together with the certainty that materials- 
will continue to rise makes this action absolutely necessary. 

Crushed Orange Syrup. 

Concentrated crushed orange syrup, a new beverage product for making soft 
drinks at home at little cost, has been manufactured by the Commisssary Divi- 
sion and is now on sale at all retail stores in quart bottles at 50 cents (with 5 cents 
for return of the bottle). It is only necessary to add several tablespoonfuls to a glass 
of ice cold water to obtain a drink that will, as a rule, allay the thirst. The fresh 
fruit flavor makes it delicious as well as refreshing. The time and trouble usually 
spent in cutting and crushing the fruit is saved, this drink being preparable within 
a few minutes. 

Cabbage. 

The commissary purchasing agent has advised that just prior to the departure 
of the steamship Advance from New York there was little cabbage in the market 
and that it was the general opinion that it would be impossible to obtain this vege- 
table in shipping condition for the next five weeks, after which good "Danish" 
cabbage would be coming into the market. 

However, commissary customers will probably suffer no inconvenience on this 
account as the supply from Costa Rica will, it is believed, be sufficient to last during 
this period. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1,50: address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class mattti' February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act ot March S. 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 15, 1919. No. 9. 



Notice to Steamship Lines. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 11, 1919. 

1. Difficulties experienced in securing *he delivery of sufficient coal to snpply ships 
using the Canal with all the bunker coal they desire, make it necessary to request the 
cooperation of steamship lines in limiting the amount of coal required by their ships 
to a minimum. 

2. For the present, it is requested that vessels be dispatched so that those passing 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific will require only sufficient bunker coal to reach San 
Francisco, Honolulu, or Coronel. Those vessels trading to South American ports 
north of Valparaiso will be supplied with sufficient coal for return voyage to the Canal. 
In the case of vessels passing from the Pacific to the Atlantic and bound for European 
ports, it will be impracticable at present to supply them with sufficient bunker coal 
to make the voyage direct, but they will be bunkered to reach Norfolk, or Newport 
News, Va. 

3. Those vessels using either terminal port as a terminus of their established route 
should be dispatched so as to require only sufficient coal to make the next port of call 
on their established route where a commercial coaling station is available. 

4. Those vessels using either terminal port merely as a port of call will be given 
coal only in exceptional cases. 

Chester Harding, Governor. 

Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending October 11, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Alexandrian 

S. M. Spalding 

Gen. W. C. Gorgas.. 

Middlebury 

Santa Leonora 

fanta Malta 

Acajutla 

Jamaica 

Advance 

Salvador 

Achilles 

Laura C.Hall 

Aysen 

Atenas 

Ansaldo I 

Chile 

Santa Marta 

Marica 

Cauca 

Neptune 

Panama 

Mctaoan 



Line or charterer. 



Leyland Line 

Pan-American Pet. <fc Trans. Co. . 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

United States Government 

United Stales Government 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Fanama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Panama Railroad Steamsiiip Line. 

Pacific Metal Corporation 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

Societa Nazionale Navigazione. . . 

Pacific Ste^m Navigation Co 

United Fruit Company 

United States Government 

Paeific Steam Navigation Co 

United Slates Government 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 
Pnitn I Prmt rvmmnv. . 



Arrived. 



October 5.. 
October 6. , 
October 7., 
Ostober8.. 
October 8.. 
October 8. 



October 9. 
October 9. 



October 10. 
October 10. 

O'-tol.or 11. 



Departed. 



October 5.. . 
October 5.. , 
October 5.. . 
October 6.. . 
October 6... 
October B.. , 
October 7.. . 
October 7 . , 
October 7.. . 
October 9.. , 
October 10.. 
October 10.. 



October 9.. . 
October 10., 
October 9.. . 
October 9. . 



October 10. 



O^nher 11. 



Cargo- 



Discharged Laded. 



Tons. 



302 
12,023 
65 
l,6fi6 
179 
137 



28 
203 



17 
3,262 

50 



Tom. 

163 
C) 

4,215 

70 

i 

8 

1,080} 

713 

1,568 

1,042 J 

<•) 

55' 



H 



J7 



792 
95) 



695 



OS 



No cargo laaed. 



t Pounds. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending October 11, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded 


Salvador 


Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navi ration Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Anglo-American Steamship Co 

Marco Ro"co 

.TnWnn T.i-0, 


October 7, 
October 9 

October 10.... 
fWnnpr in. . 


Octoher 7 


Tons. 
93 


Tom. 


Acajutla 


2 

9 
1 1 








Chile.. 


October 9.... 




Laura C. Hall... 


October 9. . . 




34 


Ansaldo I 

Sa'l FYanFUICO 


October 10.. . . 
Op»n'.er 11.. 


5 

1?i 



106 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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107 



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a: ^3 



108 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Bonded Warehouses near Atlantic End of the Canal. 

Contracts have been entered into by the Government of Panama 
with two United States corporations for the establishment of bonded 
warehouses in the city of Colon, adjacent to the Atlantic terminus of 
the Canal, and one of the firms has its warehouse well advanced toward 
completion. The contracts provide for the importation and reexpor- 
tation of goods under a net tariff charge of about two per cent. 

Cristobal, the Atlantic terminus of the Canal, is the port at which 
most of the transshipment of goods at the Canal is handled. Six 
lines plying the Pacific make Cristobal their terminus, their vessels 
passing through the Canal on each voyage, but there is no line which 
runs from the Atlantic through the Canal to complete its voyage at the 
Pacific terminus. Such a service was established by the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Line shortly after the opening of the Canal 
but was abandoned. During the past 2 years and 8 months, from 
January 1, 1917, to September 1, 1919, the incoming cargo handled 
over the piers at Cristobal has been slightly over 14 times the quantity 
received at Balboa, and that dispatched has been over 23 times as 
much as was shipped from Balboa. 

The accompanying table, printed on pages 110 and 111, shows the 
total cargo handled by the Receiving and Forwarding Agency of the 
Panama Railroad Company, operating the terminal piers of the Canal 
at Cristobal and Balboa, from August, 1914, to August, 1919, in- 
clusive. The Canal was opened on August 15, 1914. As far as the old 
records are available the table shows also the cargo received, dis- 
patched, and rehandled, and, as a matter of local interest, the cargo 
stevedored by the forces of the Receiving and Forwarding Agency. 
Where a quantity is unknown the fact is indicated by leaders in the 
table. The sudden drop in tonnage rehandled at Cristobal, after Oc- 
tober, 1916, was due to the better preparation of ships' papers prior 
to discharging cargo on the piers and subsequent establishment of 
better connections between carriers. Rehandling is simply a feature 
of discharging and storing or relading cargo; the real index of traffic 
is the cargo received and the cargo dispatched. Relatively little cargo 
originates on the Isthmus, and the difference between cargo received 
and dispatched is approximately the goods of which the final destina- 
tion is the Isthmus. 

The quantities of cargo received and cargo dispatched through the 
Receiving and Forwarding Agency at Cristobal are shown graphically 
on the accompanying chart, by months from the opening of the Canal. 
Up to April 15, 1916, traffic through the Canal was subjected to inter- 
ruptions by the slides, and this was reflected in extensive fluctuations 
of goods transshipped over the terminal piers and by way of the 
Panama Railroad. From the middle of 1917 the movement of goods 
has been steadier. An interesting feature is the development of cargo 
dispatched, as shown by the broken line; with the virtual completion 
of Canal and terminal construction it has approached the height of 
the solid line indicating cargo received, and the lagging parallelism 
between the lines has become very distinct since March, 1918. The 
chart affords no index for the future, only suggesting that with the 
steadying of traffic, violent variations in the yearly average are not to 
be expected, though with the development of warehousing and trans- 
shipping businesses on the Isthmus a gradual increase of cargo handled 
over the piers would normally be anticipated. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



109 



TONS OF CARGO. 

1916 1917 



1919 



97,000 



90,000 



80,000 



70,000 



60,000 



60,000 



40,000 



30,000 



20,000 



10,000 




1914 



1915 



1916 



1917 



1918 



191-9 



CHART OF CARGO RECEIVED AND DISPATCHED BY RECEIVING AND FORWARDING AGENCY OF PANAMA 
RAILROAD AT CRISTOBAL; SOLID LINE INDICATES CARGO RECEIVED. BROKEN LINE CARGO DISPATCHED. 
VERTICAL LINES REPRESENT MONTHS AND HORIZONTAL LINES THOUSANDS OF TONS OF CARGO. 



110 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Cargo Handled by Receiving and Forwarding Agency During Five Years of Canal Operation. 

PORT OF CRISTOBAL. 



Month. 


Cargo 
received. 


Cargo 
dispatched. 


Cargo 
rehandled. 


Total 
handled. 


Cargo 
stevedored. 


1914. 


51, £93 
43,881 
54,841 
38,500 
68,000 


17,612 

14,874 
8,940 
8,500 

22,000 


19,202 
12,000 

4,262 
14,000 

5,500 


88,807 
70,755 
68,043 
61,000 
95.500 
























Total, 1914 


257,215 

••9,500 
46,200 
49,500 
54,999 
53.301 
78,232 
62,85! 
77, 970 
50,500 
62,211 
67.287 
37,062 


71,926 

24,500 
17,000 
24,000 
27,065 
27,734 
25,665 
32,642 
33,262 
24,525 
43,907 
51,833 
21,599 


54,964 

21,175 
14,600 
14,900 
27.75S 
29,817 
27,849 
30,000 
19,061 
9,135 
20,639 
31.425 
22,414 


384,105 

95,175 

77,800 

88,400 
109, S22 
110,852 
131,746 
125,493 
130.296 

84 , 160 
126,757 
150,545 

81,075 




1915. 
























Julv 




























Total, 1915 


689,613 

65,314 
52,281 
68,948 
69,623 

96,479 
90,450 
70,042 
79,448 
88,018 
74,068 
77,776 
81,970 


353,732 

39,905 
27,111 
35,926 
42,422 
62 i486 
71,541 
57,930 
62,405 
54,498 
46,392 
62,411 
66,865 


26S.776 

35,684 
22,000 
47,500 
67,200 
78,500 
52,000 
35,000 
42,559 
38,000 
35,257- 
984 
1,334 


1,312,121 

140,903 
101,392 
152,374 
179,245 
237,465 
213,991 
162,972 
184,412 
ISO, 516 
155,717 
141,171 
150,169 




1916. 
























July 














68,641 




73,251 




64,820 






Total, 1916 


914,417 

05,664 
54,237 
77,067 
71,535 
78,397 
79,739 
84,866 
72,833 
51,165 
74,198 
66,823 
50,354 


629,892 

55,648 

33,408 
39,8.31 
47,739 
51.616 
64,897 
62,367 
53,308 
55.272 
49,900 
41,877 
34,417 


456, 01S 

746 

461 

845 

2,365 

811 

558 

2,194 

2,696 

1,719 

3,806 

2,546 

4,676 


2,000,327 

122,058 
88,196 
117,743 
121,039 
130,824 
145.104 
149,427 
128,837 
108,156 
127,904 
111,246 
89,447 




1917. 










61,154 




59,005 




67,455 




68,017 


July 


79,787 




58,425 




58,733 




76,607 




64,738 




44,798 






Total, 1917 


826,878 

64,430 
54, 70S 
63,462 
58,774 
75,047 
63,955 
62, 90S 
01,762 
56,526 
47,976 
68,664 
60,419 


590,370 

31,768 
32,171 
41,440 
56,177 
48,751 
65,065 
45,826 
58,606 
55,106 
39,706 
47,830 
54,426 


23,423 

3,016 
1,597 
1,627 
2,513 
3,211 
1,993 
3,279 
3,402 
2,850 
3,210 
4,130 
2,737 


1,440,671 

99,214 
88,476 
106,529 
117,464 
127,009 
131,013 
112,013 
123,770 
114,552 
91,892 
120,624 
117,572 




1918. 


51,892 




42,528 


March 


58,661 




62,816 




57,609 




57,694 


Julv 


55,824 




54,679 




61,750 




39,630 




51,454 




66,177 






Total, 1918 


738,631 

67,461 
76,063 
55,800 
75,343 
58,458 
59,089 
39,118 
78,172 


576,932 

"51,105 
62,821 

49,588 
54.949 
43,201 
42,877 
46,087 
44.S92 


33,565 

4,822 
3,094 
4,316 
3,081 
2,217 
1,522 
666 
1,434 


1,350,128 

123,388 
141,978 
109,704 
133,378 
103,876 
103,488 
85,871 
124,498 


660,714 


1919. 


6 9 722 


Februarv 


80,851 


March 


47,471 




73,098 


May 


70,864 




41,250 




30,545 


Augubt 


59,989 






Total, 1919 


509,509 
3,936,263 


394,520 


21,152 


926,181 


469,790 






Grand total to Senrember 1. 1919 


2,617,372 


857,898 


7,413,533 





THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



111 



TORT OF BALBOA. 



Month. 


Cargo 
received. 


Cargo 
dispatched. 


Cargo 
rehandlcd. 


Total 
handled. 


Cargo 
stevedored. 


Total 

handled 

both ports. 


1914. 


27,160 
11,960 
11,436 
23,163 
17,027 

90,746 

23,020 
20,445 
21,025 
29,469 
19,274 
19,756 
20,236 
15,144 


27,127 
9,508 
10,709 
12,379 
16,411 




54,287 
21,468 
22,145 
35,542 
33,438 




143,094 








92,223 








90,188 








96,542 








128,938 










Total, 1914 


76,134 

17,596 
18,647 
22,(170 
23,248 
20,086 
17,776 
16,615 
11,173 




166,880 

40,616 
39,092 
43,101 
52,717 
39,360 
37,532 
36,851 
26,317 
18,434 
60,043 
94,000 
55,569 




550,985 


1915. 
January 




18,783 
18,967 
18,796 
23,225 
20,530 
19,189 
5,147 


135,791 






116,892 






131,501 






162,539 






150,212 






169,278 


Julv 




162,344 






156,613 








102,594 












186,800 












244,545 








9,540 




136,644 












Total, 1915 








543,632 

70,310 
69,401 
69.483 
26,488 
6,000 
6,794 
8,546 
4,129 
4,170 
18,284 
19,853 
3,582 




1,855,753 


1916. 










211,213 








15.441 

17,650 

18,602 

3,441 

590 

796 

770 

98 

7,346 

5,704 

228 


12,180 
5,054 
1,603 
3,369 
1,689 

282 
4,330 

501 

665 
1,024 

707 


170,793 


March 






221,857 


April 






205,733 








243,525 




1.472 
6.414 
2,738 
3,053 
10,545 
12,657 
3,315 


4,732 
1,336 

621 
1,019 

393 

1,492 

39 


220,785 




171,518 




188.541 




184,686 




174,001 




161,024 




153,751 






Total, 1916 








307,100 

12,790 

10,063 

11,308 

2,798 

7,266 

4,726 

3,149 

1,083 

2,401 

3,531 

20,145 

4,265 




2,307,427 


1917. 


11.270 

9,310 
3,408 
2,560 
4,664 
3,575 
2,365 
869 
2,199 
1,528 
12,814 
2,781 


920 

753 

7,900 

238 

2,602 

1,151 

7S4 

214 

202 

2,003 

7,331 

1,484 


600 


2,491 
179 


134,848 




98,259 






129,051 


April 




528 

2,225 

1,719 

479 

483 

377 

2,972 

12,171 

176 


124,437 






138,090 






149,920 






152,576 


August 




129,920 






110,557 






131,435 






131,391 






93,712 








Total, 1917 


57,343 

3,506 
2.303 
2,924 
7,697 
3,945 
3,459 
1,788 
3,137 
1,854 
7.024 
1,401 
5,282 


25,582 

1,548 
2,131 

169 
1,032 
2,353 
1,464 

541 

752 
2,093 
6,799 

S30 
3.771 




83,525 

5,108 
4,434 
3,093 
8,728 
6,207 
4,923 
2,329 
3,888 
3,947 
15,744 
2,359 
9,271 




1,524,196 


1918. 
January 




3,263 


104,322 


February 




92,910 


March 




14S 
561 
306 

2,846 
835 

2,680 

375 

14,199 

452 

7,839 


109,622 


April 




126,192 






133,308 


June 




135,936 






114,343 


August 




127,658 


September 




118,499 


October 


1,021 
US 
21S 


107,638 




122,983 




126,843 






Total, 1918 


45,220 

4,437 

1,283 

11,480 

5,405 

4,0'.; 

7,646 
8,117 


23,483 

3,951 
3,290 

2,047 
3,020 
551 
751 
1,510 
3,150 




70,121 

8,456 
4,573 
21,637 
1 , 145 
4,888 
1,487 
14,479 
15,604 


33,504 

3,106 

3,234 

3,586 

174 

253 

176 

134 

1,917 


1,420,249 
131 844 


1919. 
January 


6S 


February 


146,551 




8,110 

2,630 

270 

62 

5,323 

4,337 


131,341 
134,523 
108,764 
104 975 


April 




June 


J.ilv 


100,350 
140 102 


August 






Total, 1919 


43,201 


IS, 270 


20.S00 


72,269 


12,580 


998,450 




-^Orand total to September 1. 10 1 ft 








1.243,527 




8,657.060 



112 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Toll Charges in Connection with Double Bottom Spaces. 

Because of a decision of the Commissioner of Navigation, received 
since the publication of The Panama Canal Record of last week, 
the statement in that issue on this matter is amended to read as follows: 
Under the present method of assessing tolls on loaded merchant vessels, transiting 
the Panama Canal, spaces in cellular double bottoms are, in effect, not charged for 
even when such spaces are used to carry fuel oil, boiler feed water, drinking water, 
or cargo, when the Panama Canal net tonnage times $1.20 exceeds the United States 
net tonnage times $1.25. 

The above does not apply, however, to a merchant ship in ballast. 



Notice to Mariners.— Serrana Bank Light Relighted. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 13, 1919. 
Circular No. 643-67: 

Serrana Bank Light, previously reported out of commission, was relighted on 
October 10, 1919: 

Light — White, flashing, 0.5 second light, 4.5 seconds dark. 
Latitude 14° 16' 40" north. 
Longitude 80' 23' 50" west. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Cargo Declarations. 

The cargo declaration referred to in Circular No. 679-9, dated Sep- 
tember 29, as acceptable in place of a manifest from ships making the 
transit of the Canal but not handling cargo at its terminal ports, is a 
single sheet, folded once, giving four pages, each 8 by 10£ inches. 
Over 90 classifications of cargo are listed, with spaces opposite for 
quantity, port at which shipped, and port at which to be discharged. 
The following instructions are printed at the top of the first page : 

A copy of this form is handed to the master of each vessel arriving at Balboa or 
Cristobal for passage through the Canal, if he has not been previously provided with 
the form through the office of his steamship line. It should be filled in while the vessel 
is in transit (if not previously prepared) and delivered to the pilot at the opposite ter- 
minal port. Extra copies for future use will be supplied at the Canal. 

Accurate information is desired concerning cargo that is important on account of its 
tonnage or value, though it is not expected that small and unimportant items of cargo 
will be entered separately on the list. . , , , .... , 

In the case of ships carrying general cargo it is desired that the principal items be 
listed, and the remainder may be included under the designation 'general. 

Entries should be made in tons of 2,240 pounds wherever possible. Please give the 
value of treasure. 

Addressing Mail for Ships at the Canal. 

All mail for ships transiting the Canal or for ships touching at Canal 
ports is handled through the Cristobal, Canal Zone, post office and 
should be addressed, "Cristobal, Canal Zone." 

Mail addressed to Colon or Panama may miss connection, as ships 
at all times are in Canal waters. The attention of shipping interests is 
called to the fact that Cristobal and Balboa are the terminal ports of 
entry for Colon and Panama, and that ships arrive at and depart from 
Cristobal and Balboa, and not Colon and Panama. 

It will be noted that this applies to all ships, including those which 
call only at Balboa in passing along the west coast. The Cristobal post 
office receives reports of expected arrival three times daily and forwards 
to Balboa the mail for ships due there. 



% THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 113 

The Roosevelt Memorial. 

Governor Harding has accepted the chairmanship of the Canal Zone 
branch of the Roosevelt Memorial Association and issues an invitation 
to the employees of The Panama Canal, Panama Railroad Company, 
and other residents of the Canal Zone and Republic of Panama to 
become subscribers to the memorial fund. It is the intention of the 
association to construct a monumental memorial at Washington, 
D. C. and establish a memorial park at Oyster Bay which will ulti- 
mately include Sagamore Hill, the old home of Colonel Roosevelt. 
It is a nonpartisan, nonpolitical cause. No one will be urged to con- 
tribute to the fund, the object of the association being simply to 
encourage and facilitate the subscriptions of those who desire to 
participate in the erection of these memorials. 

The Governor has appointed a local chairman for each town and 
military post on the Canal Zone and for the cities of Panama and Colon 
through whom subscriptions to the memorial fund may be made. 
Arrangements have also been made whereby employees of The Panama 
Canal and Panama Railroad Company can have their subscription 
paid by collection from the pay rolls for the month of October or 
November if desired. It is intended to hold public meetings in each of 
the towns during the week of October 20-27, which is the time fixed for 
the campaign throughout the United States. 

The fact that Theodore Roosevelt took such a personal interest in 
the construction of the Panama Canal will serve to make the pro- 
posed memorial to him of unusual interest to Panama Canal em- 
ployees, especially the older ones who now have the naedal authorized 
by him for those employees who were here during construction. 

Rates at Hotel Aspinwal), Taboga. 
The following rates at the Hotel Aspinwall, Taboga, have been 
established, effective August 1: 

Employees: Dinner, lodging, and breakfast $2 . 00 

Employees per day . . 2 . 75 

Children under 12 years of age per day . . 1 .25 

Servants of employees per day . . 1 .50 

Employees for stay of 7 days per day . . 2 . 00 

Reduction of 10 per cent on above rates for stay of 30 days. Reduction of 
10 per cent for families of four or more for over 7 days' stay. 

Nonemployees per day . . 3 .50 

Children of nonemployees (under 12 years of age) per day . . 1 . 50 

Servants of nonemployees per day . . 1.75 

Meals: 

Breakfast 1 .00 

Luncheon 1 . 25 

Dinner 1 . 25 

Schedule of Official Jitney Service. 

Following is the schedule of the official jitney plying between Balboa 
shops and the Ancon police station, carrying employees in the 
conduct of official business, upon presentation of passes issued by the 
Chief Quartermaster, or of the "special pass" issued by the Governor: 

FROM ANCON POLICE STATION TO BALBOA SHOPS. 

Police Station Leave on the hour and half hour. 

Administration Building Leave 7 minutes and 37 minutes after the hour. 

Balboa Commissary Leave 10 minutes and 40 minutes after the hour. 

Balboa Shops Arrive l.S minutes and 45 minutes after the hour. 

FROM BALBOA SHOPS TO ANCON POLICE STATION. 

Balboa Shops Leave IS minutes and 45 minutes rafter the hour. 

R° r ' Captain's Office Leave 18 minutes and 45 minutes after the hour. 

Balboa Commissary Leave 20 minutes and 50 minutes after the hour. 

Administration Building Leave 25 minutes and 55 minuses after the hour. 

Ancon Police Station Arrive on the hour and half hour. 



114 



THF PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Prices of Various Commodities for Ships. 

Commodities of especial interest to ships' operators and for sale by 
the storehouses of The Panama Canal, are listed below and base 
prices are quoted, effective October 1, 1919, for sales to individuals 
and companies. Except as otherwise noted, all prices given are sub- 
ject to a surcharge of 25 per cent. 



Commodity. 



Unit. 



Brass, bar , 

Brass, sheet 

Bronze, Tobin 

Cement, at Panama: 

Departments of United States Government, (includes surcharge and bags) . 

CredH for empty bags returned 

Individuals and companies (includes surcharge and ba 6 s) 

Credit for empty bags returaed 

Cement, at Colon: 

Departments of United States Government, (includes surcharge and bags) . 

Credit for empty bags returned 

Individuals and companies (includes surcharge and bags) 

Credit for empty bags returned 

Charcoal 

Copper, bar 

Gasoline, in drum (motor grade) 

Lead, sheet 

Lead, pig 

Lumber, yellow pine or fir (except ceiling) 

Lumber, ceiling, 1 by 6 

Lumber, flooring, 1 by 3 and 1 by 4 

Metal, yellow 

Nuts, iron, machine, hexagonal 

Nuts, iron, machine, square 

Nails, common, wire 

Nails, galvanized 

Oakum, Navy, spun 

Oakum, Navy, unspun 

Fuel oil, at Balboa and Cristobal — in bul.c: 

United States Army and Navy, and vessels operated by same 

Commercial vessels and individuals and companies 

Individuals and companies from tank No. 116, Balboa 

Fuel oil, at Balboa and Cristobal — in drums or barrels: 

United States Army and Navy and vessels operated by same 

Commercial vessels and individuals and companies 

Oils, greases, and lubricants: 

Oil, air compressor cylinder 

Oil, ammonia cylinder 

Oil, burning, "Colza" 

Oil, cylinder, dark marine, "Texas" 

Oil, cylinder, ice machine, steam, "Garnett" 

Oil, engine, "Arctic" , 

Oil, engine, "Cetus" — in tins 

Oil, engine. "Cetus" — in barrels 

Oil, gas engine, ' 'Texas," heavy — in drums 

Oil, gas engine, "Ursa" — in barrels 

Oil, gas engine. "Ursa" — in cases 

Oil, gas, engine, "Algol" — in drums 

Oil, kerosene — in drums 

Oil, kerosene — in tins 

Oil, linseed, boiled 

Oil, linseed, raw. . . ._ 

Oil, locomotive, engine 

Oil, lard 

Oil, marine engine, "Gargoyle" 

Oil, marine engine, "Atlas" 

Oil, marine, dark, cylinder, "Vacuum," W. I 

Oil, marine, engjne, "Dolphin" 

Oil, marine, engine, "Texas" 

Oil, "Mineral Seal" 

Oil, nonliquid 

Oil, stationary engine 

Oil, sperm 

Oil, signal 

Oil, valve ._ 

Oil, car .' 



Vaclite. 

Wax, lamp 

Grease, black, gear 

Grease, yellow, cup. No. 3. 
Grease, yellow, cup. No. 5. 

Grease, rod, special 

Grease, tunnel, bearing 

Tallow 

Turpentine 

Turpentine substitute 



Lb. 
Lb. 

Lb. 



Bag 



Bas 

Cwt. 

Lb. 

Gal. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

M ft. B.M. 

M ft. B.M. 

M tt. B.M. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

42-gal. bbl. 
42-gal. bbl. 
42-gal. bbl. 

42-gal. bbl. 
42-gal. bbl. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal 

Gal. 

Gal 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Lb. 

Gal. 

Gal. • 

Gal 

Gal 

Gal. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb 

Lb. 

GaL 

Gal. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



115 



Commodity. 


Unit. 


Price. 




Lb 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

T.h 

Lb. 

Cft. 

Cft 

Cft. 

Cft. 

Cft. 

Cft. 

Cft. 

Cft. 

Cft. 

Cft 

Cft. 

Cft. 

Cft. 

Cft. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb 


80.09 




10 




12 




.18 




.18 


Rivets 


.16 

.08 




.75 




1.65 




2.85 




4.50 




4.75 




6.00 




7.^0 




in.no 




IS. 00 


Rope, Manila, 1 f " diameter 


27 .00 




33 00 




4 n 00 


Rope, Manila, 3" diameter 


90 00 




100 00 


Steel, bar t 


05 




• 10 


Steel, cold rolled, rd 


.08 


Steel, sheet 


05 


Steel, structural (angles, beams, etc.) 


.05 


Tin, block 


.78 




SO 




16 


Washers, cut 


10 


Waste, white and colored 


.17 


Zinc, boiler plate | bv 6 bv 12 


.12 



* No surcharge. 



f Steel now on hand purchased at a cost over .05 lb. will be given the purchase price. 



Weather Conditions in September, 1919. 

The rainfall during the month of September was above the average at 11 stations 
and deficient at 8 stations. Totals ranged from 8.33 inches at Miraflores to 22.52 
inches at the Indio station on. the upper Chagres. The greatest amount of precipi- 
tation on any one day wis 3.96 inches, at Monte Lirio on the 8th. 

The estimated average rainfall over the Gatun Lake watershed was 12.49 inches, 
compared with a 9-year mean of 11.87 inches, and over the Chagres River basin 
above Alhajuela it was 14.10 inches compared with an 18-year mean of 12.58 inches. 

A severe wind storm occurred at Gamboa on the afternoon of September 26, dur- 
ing which a maximum velocity of 50 miles an hour was recorded from the northeast. 
Two unloading cranes at the Gamboa gravel plant were overturned and damaged to 
the extent of approximately $20,000. 

The atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, and wind movement were slightly 
below normal, while the air temperature was below normal everywhere except at 
Colon. The evaporation was above normal over the Atlantic Coast and Gatun Lake, 
but below on the Pacific Coast. 

A number of fogs were observed at interior stations, most of which were light 
and lifted or were dissipated by 9 a. m. 

Gatun Luke hydrology.- — Mean elevation of Gatun Lake was 85.22 feet above sea 
level; maximum, 85.54 on the 30th, minimum, 85.01 on the 11th; evaporation 
from Gatun Lake surface, 4.372 inches; rainfall on Gatun Lake drainage basin, 
12.40 inches; total yield of Gatun Lake watershed, 7.63 inches on watershed. The 
total yield amounted to 61 per cent of the rainfall. 

The following table given as summary of the weather conditions for the month: 





•a 

"8*3 
i^ a 

2 H ^ 
£ ° o 


Temperature. 


> 

g a 
% M 

86.9 
81.2 


Precipitation. 


Wind. 


Stations. 


a 

1 

a 

79.4 
80.6 
79 3 


a 

B 
a 

s 

00 
90 
93 
90 




a 

S 
•a 

2 


a 


a 


a 

O M 

'■S a 


S si 

' o 

-= a 

" o 

>>■?, 
a a 
Q-S 


11 

f2a 


a 

be o 

N.W. 

S.E. 
N.E. 
B.E. 


if 
is 

27 
50 
24 


a 

| 
Q 


3 

OS 

Q 


Balboa 

Heights . . 
Colon 


29.834 
29.830 


Sep. 6 
Pep. 12 
Sep. 18 
Sen. 1 "> 


71 
73 
71 
73 


Sep. 27 
Sep. 4 
Sep. 2* 

Son. 1 


10. ?4 

11 74 

G 39 

8 42 


7. S9 
12 65 
10.38 
10.05 


21 

20 
20 
18 


4,090 
4,928 
3,111 
4,397 


S. 

N. 
N. E. 
S. E. 


Seo. 13 
Sep 7 
Sep. 26 
Sen. 24 






SO 4 



* Ajid other dates. 



116 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service 
Board, Balboa Heights (telephone 286): 

Dictating-machine operator (male and female); $1,100 to $1,400 a year; No. 475; November 7 
and December 14, 1919; form 304; age, atleast 18 rears. 

Typist (male and female); $1,100 a year; No." 300- am ended; October 26 and December 7, 1919, 
and January 11, 1920; form 304; age, at least 18 years. 

I Clerk with knowledge of stenography (men and women) ; SI, 200 a Year; No. 300-amended; October 
26 and December 7, 1919, and January 11, 1920; form 304; age, at least 18 vears. 

J Local and assistant inspector of boilers (male); $2,100 to $2, S00 a year; No. 270-amesded; Novem- 
ber 7 and 8, 1919, and January 11 and 12, 1920; form 1087; age, at least 25 years but under 55 years. 
' Local and assistant inspector of hulls (male); $2,100 to $2,500 a year; No. 270-amended; November 
7 and 8, 1919, and January 11 and 12. 1920; form 1087; age, at least 25 years but under 55 years. 

Electrical engineer (male) ; $2,400 to $3,600 a year; No. 394-amended; November 11, 1919; form 
2118; age, no limits.* 

Assistant electrical engineer (male); $2,000 to $2,400 a vear; No. 394-amended; November 11, 1919; 
form 2118; age, no limits.* 

Electrical assistant (male); $1,500 to $2,000 a year; No. 394-amended; November 11, 1919; form 
1312; age, no limits.* 

Specialist in industrial and economic relations in education (female); $3,500 a year; November 11, 
1919; form 2118; age, no limits.* 

Deputy chief, U. S. game warden (male); $2,500 to $3,000 a year; November 4, 1919; form 1312.* 

Assistant in date investigations (male); $l,o00 to $2,250 a year; November 7, 1919; form 1312; 
age, at least 21 years but under 50 years. 

Plant engineer (male); $5,000 a year; November 11, 1919; form 1312; age, under 45 years.* 

Assistant auditor (male and female) ; $1 ,400 to $1 ,800 a year for grade I, and $2,000 to $2,500 a year 
for grade II; November 21, 1919; form 1312; age, at least 20 vears but under 45 years. 

Assistant chief chemist (male) ; $3,000 to $4,000 a year; November 11, 1919: age, no limits* 

Solar radiation assistant. Weather Bureau (rcale), $1,080 to $1,200 a year; form 304; age, at least 
18 years, but under 55 years. 

► Junior irrigation engineer (male); $1,440 to $1,800 a year; November 9, 1919; form 1312; age, under 
35 years. 

Research operator — metallurgical (male); grade I, $1 .500 to $2,000 a year; grade II, $2,090 to $2,500 
ayear; November 18, 1919; form 1312; age, at least 21 years.* 

Predatory animal inspector (male); $1,500 a year; No. 487, November 4, 1919; form 2118; age, 
at least 25 years but under 45 years.* 

Drainage engineer (male); $1,800 to $2,100 a year; No. 476; November 4, 1919; form 1312; age, 
at least 25 years but under 45.* 

Wet plate process photographer (male); $1,500 a year; No. 488; November 11, 1919; form 1312; 
age, at least 20 years.* 

Forest ranger (male); $900 to $1,200 a year; No. 474; October 27, 1919; form 1312; age, at least 
21 years but under 40. 

Chief of Division of Relations with States (male and female); $3,500 to $4,500 a year; No. 470- 
Bupplemental; November 4, 1919; form 2118.* 

Circular 465 regarding examination for artist. Public Health Service, Treasury Department; $1,800 
ayear; October 14, 1919; form 1312; has been changed to include women as well as men. 

Supervising assistant and inspector (male and female); $2,800 to $3,600 a year; No. 470-supple- 
mental; November 4, 1919; form 2118.* 

Field agent (male and female); $1,800 to $3,0*0 a year; November 4, 1919; form 2118.* 

♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business on 
that day. 



Route Service Jitney— Cristobal-Mt. Hope. 

The following is the schedule of the official jitney service between 
the Terminal building at Cristobal and Mount Hope. Cars stop at 
the office of the Commissary Division each way: 



Leave Terminal Building. 

A. M. P. M. 

8.00 12.30 

8.30 1.00 

9.00 1.30 

9.30 2.00 

10.00 2.30 

10.30 3.00 

3.30 



Leave Mount Hope. 
A.M. P.M. 



8.15 
8.45 
9.15 
9.45 
10.15 
10.45 



12.45 
1.15 
1.45 
2.15 
2.45 
3.15 
3.45 



Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," or '"The Panama 
Canal, Washington, D. C." 

I The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthi-.us, is "Pancanal, Panama;" in the 
United States, "Pancanal, Washington." 

I Mail for ships passing through '.he Canal or touching at either of the terminal porta should be 
addressed to "Cristobal, Canal Zone." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



117 



Official Circulars. 



Restriction of Hunting. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 9, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective this date, circulars 
to all concerned, dated December 12, 1918, and 
August 5, 1919. granting permission to hunt on 
Sundays and holidays within that part of the 
Canal Zone lying west of the Canal between the 
Cocoli River and the Paraiso-Arraijan trail, 
and south from the Cocoli River to the coast, 
respectively, are hereby revoked. This is neces- 
sary owing to the large number of cattle now 
in this area, and consequent danger to the men 
and the live stock from hunting. 

Therefore, on and after this date all hunting is 
prohibited within that part of the Canal Zone 
lying west of the Canal south from the Carabali 
River to the coast. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Correspondence Addressed to Army or Navy 
Headquarters. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. October 7, 1919. 
To Heads of DErARTMENTS and Divisions: 

Letters and correspondence prepared bv depart- 
ments and divisions and addressed to the Com- 
manding General of U. S. Troops on the Isthmus, 
Ancon, or to the Commandant, Fifteenth U. S. 
Naval District, Balboa, will be signed by the 
Governor. 

Routine letters and correspondence intended 
for Army or Navy headquarters on the Isthmus 
which are not of such importance as to call for 
signature by the Governor, may be (signed by 
heads of departments and divisions, in which 
case they may be addressed as follows: 
The Adjutant, 

Office of Chief of Staff, 

Panama Canal Department, 
Ancon, C. Z. 
or 
Aide to the Comma ndant, 
lSth U. S. Naval District, 
Balboa. C. Z. 
By direction of the Governor. 

C. A. McIlvaine. 
Executive Secretary. 



Steamship Crews Riding on Engines and 
Cars. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation. 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. October 2, 1919. 
Circular No. 1382: 

Conductors, Engineers, Yardmasters. — Report 
has been made to this office tint some of the 
Cristobal yard crews are allowing employees of 
steamship crews to pass through the yard on en- 
gines and cars. 

This must be discontinued at once, as such 
practice if allowe 1 to continue will result in con- 
siderable smuggling and pilfering. 

W. J. Bissell, 
Acting Master of Transpcrtation. 



Syrups for Retail Trade. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., October 7. 1919. 
Memorandum No. ?60-234: 

Concentrated orange and lemon syrups are 
now offered for sale at 50 cents per quart bottle, 
5 cents being refunded for return of empty bottle. 
Please place orders on wholesale groceries' for 
your requirement?. Bottles are packed 12 to 
each case. 

J. J. Jackson, 
General Manager, Commissary Division. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Suiting: 

Cotton, 28", yd $0.84 

Rainproof cotton, 28", yd 1 .20 

Rainproof cotton, 54", yd 2 .00 

Umbrellas, men's, rustless, 10 ribs, 26", ea 3.00 
Men's gun metal bals, Goodyear welt. 

Strand last, pr 10 . 70 

Men's black glazed kid Oxford, Goodyear 

welt, Balfour last, pr 9.15 

Men's gun metal calf Oxford, invisible eye- 
lets. Goodyear welt. Balfour last, pr. . . . 9.15 
Men's Norwegian veal veget tanned, fancy 

Oxford, Goodyear welt, Strand last, pr. 9.75 
Men's white sea island duck blucher Ox- 
ford, Goodyear welt, Campus last, pr. . . 7.55 
Men's Russia calf Oxford, Oakland last, pr 7 .55 

Men's black kid bals, polo last, pr 7.70 

Men's black kangaroo kid Oxford, polo 

last, pr 7 .90 

Men's, Russia calf Oxford, city last, pr. . . 7 .95 
Women's black glazed kid opera pumps, pr 7 .05 
Women's black glazed kid beaded pumps, 

pr 7.70 

Candy, hard, house party, Farley, 20-oz., 

jar 73 

Dressing, salad, Durkee's. 3-oz., bot 12 

Olives ripe, Premier XXX, 15-oz., jar 44 

Peaches, sliced, 10s tin 1 .40 

Aerated waters and beverages, grape juice, 

white, Calwa, pt., bot 26 

Caps, milk bottle. 'Help Mate," ea .11 

Earthenware (Guernsey) , bowls, mixing, ea .11 

Hooks, gate, brass. 1 \" , ea 02 

Razors, Swedish, white handle, ea 2 . 10 

Razors. Gillettesafety, silver plated. Aris- 
tocrat, ea 4 . 40 

Razors, Gillette safety, Milady Decol- 

lette, gold plated, ea 4 . 40 

Razors. Gillettesafety, packed edition No. 

20, silver plated, ea 4.40 

Razors, Gillette safety, standard combi- 
nation, set No. 00, silver plated, ea. . . . 6.60 

Trunks, Army lockers, ea 10.45 

Books, dictionary, Webster's, ea 1 .40 

Combs, men's, ivory, ea . 10 

Embroidery, cotton, yd .05 

Stationery: 

Paper, typewriter, second sheets, un- 

glazed, 8" x 10J", quire (24 sheets) . . .03 
Paper, typewriter, white bond, 8" x 

lOj", quire (24 sheets) 05 

Cream, evaporated, "Rico," 15-oz. tin 40 

Cigarettes. Lucky Strike, 50s tin 32 

Tobacco, Edgworth, sliced plug, 2-oz. tin.. .18 

Mustard, prepared, j-gal. jar 80 

(5 cents allowed for return of empty jar) 

Sugar, loaf, 5s, ctn 64 

Aerated waters and beverages: 

Grape juice, A. O. B., individual, bot. . .12 

Cigars, Golofina perfectos, ea 09 

Athletic floods: 

Books, club score, cricket, ea 1 .05 

Bikes, buster, ea 3.10 

Cups, drinking, pint, ea 04 

Dinpers, laundry or suds, ea 53 

Earthenware, (Guernsey) bowls, mixing, ea 1 .40 

Knives, mincing, double blade, ea 15 

Pans, pudding, 2-quart, ea 09 

Pans, pudding, 4-quart, ea 12 

Pans, muffin (8 plain cups), ea 19 

Pans, rinsing, 10-quart, ea 25 

Pans, mountain cake, ea 08 

Pouches, tobacco, red rubber, ea 14 

Wax. prepared, liquid, pint, bot 54 

Wheel, toy, e?. 4.15 

Wheel, toy, ea 6.90 

Men's white basketball bals. pr 3.00 

Men's white tennis bals, Klay Kort. pr. . . 2.25 
Men's work shoe, duck top, rubber soles, pr 2 .40 

Men's white canvas Oxfords, pr 6.60 

Women's black glazed kid chrome tanned 

blucher Oxfords, pr 8.20 

Women's black glazed kid chrome tanned 

bals. pr 10.40 

Women's chrome tanned Russia calf Ox- 
fords, pr 8 . 20 

Women's black patent pump, leather, low 

shoes, pr 4 . 80 



118 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Tailoring. 

The increase in cost of labor and all items entering into the composition of suits 
has risen to such an extent that the Commissary Division is obliged to make a slight 
increase in prices in its tailoring shops, which will be announced in the near future. 



Tricycles. 

Children's vehicles are not to be found in the market at present. The commissary 
purchasing agent has advised that tricycles on order will be delayed for that 
reason. Following a period when toys, etc., were in small request has come a time 
when the manufacturers are entirely unable to cope with the demand. 



Pottery. 

Deliveries of pottery from a contractor with whom the Commissary Division 
does considerable business, have been postponed due to conferences between the 
pottery workers and the potters on questions of wages which have resulted in cur- 
tailed production. 



Flowers. 

Roses, ferns, shrubs, crotons, etc., from the Corozal Hospital farms, are always 
available for purchase in the line stores. Roses are on sale every day at Ancon, 
Balboa, and Cristobal Commissaries and the managers of the other stores will be 
glad to order them for customers on request. 



Holiday Market Situation. 

The situation in the holiday markets this year is unparalleled. Buyers have been 
obliged to contend with the most adverse conditions. The commissary purchas- 
ing agent was able to make many fortunate purchases but a number of items are 
not to be had because of the present under-production in the face of world-wide 
shortages. 

Hosiery. 

It is fortunate that the Commissary Division is rather well protected on hosiery 
as it seems impossible to place orders now for delivery this year. One of the fac- 
tories from which the Commissary Division buys has announced that any orders in 
transit are subject to confirmation for next year's delivery at increased prices. 

The commissary purchasing agent has written that great difficulty is being ex- 
perienced in obtaining fashioned silk hosiery for the holiday season. It is extremely 
scarce, he states, and when a quality stocking is found, a very high price is asked. 
None of the hosiery manufacturers or manufacturers' agents are said to be taking 
orders for fashioned stockings at this time. 



Canned Salmon. 

The commissary purchasing agent has advised that higher prices are anticipated 
on canned salmon and that from all indications it will be scarce. From a reliable 
source information has been received that the packers thus far have allotted only 15 
per cent of contracts. The Surplus Division of the War Department had for sale 
none of this item but it has been found possible to purchase 500 cases of medium red 
salmon in New York. 



Beverages. 

In the preparation of its varied line of soft drinks, the Commissary Division, 
from the sterilization of the bottles until the product is ready for shipment, exercises 
a degree of care seldom met with elsewhere. All bottles pass through the automatic 
washer and sterilizer, first receiving a washing in soap suds, then with lye solution, 
three rinsings of hot water, and are finally steamed at 180° F., the entire process 
requiring five minutes. When cc*oled, the bottles are filled with the syrup and car- 
bonated water automatically and are then capped by machinery. Hands do not 
come in contact with the product at any stage. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 119 

Directory ol The Panama Canal. 



Executive Department. 

Headquarter*, Balboa Heights 

Colonel Chester Harding, U. S. A., Governor. 

M. B. SteYens, Secretary. 
C. A. McIlvaine, Executive Secretary. 

John H. Smith, Chief Clerk, Executive Off.ce. 

Guy Johannes, Chief, Police and Fire Division. 

Crede H. Calhoun, Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 

A. R. Lang, Superintendent, Division of Schools. 

T. S. Booz, General Secretary, Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds. 
Frank Feuille, Special Attorney, Ancon. 

Walter F. Van Dame, Assistant to the Special Attorney and Land Agent, 
Ancon. 
Albert C. Hindman, District Attorney, Ancon. 



Department of Operation and Maintenance. 

(Under immediate direction of the Governor as Head of the Department.) 
Headquarters, Balboa Heights. 

Lt.-Col. J. J. Morrow, U. S. A., Engineer of Maintenance. 
W. L. Hersh, Electrical Engineer, Electrical Division. 
W. R. Hollo way, Superintendent, Pacific Locks, Pedro Miguel. 

E. D. Stillwell, Superintendent, Gatun Locks, Gatun. 

C. J. Embree, Office Engineer. 

O. E. Malsbury, Assistant Engineer, Section of Surveys. 

R. Z. Kirkpatrick, Chief Hydrographer, Section of Meteorology and Hydrog- 
raphy. 

D. E. Wright, Municipal Engineer, Division of Municipal Engineering. 
Joel M. Pratt, Superintendent, Dredging Division, Paraiso. 

John G. Claybourn, Assistant Engineer, Dredging Division, Balboa. 

F. E. Holleran, Assistant Engineer, Fortifications Division, Balboa Heights. 
T. C. Morris, Resident Engineer, Building Division. 

■ , Assistant Engineer, Building Division. 

Samuel M. Hitt, Architect. 
Capt. Leonard R. Sargent, U. S. N., Marine Superintendent, Marine Division. 
Lieut. Com. J. G. Fels, U. S. N. R. F., Captain of the Port, Cristobal. 
Lieut. Com. Chas. Svensson, U. S. N. R. F., Captain of the Port, Balboa. 
Board of Local Inspectors — Lieut. Com. J. G. Fels, U. S. N. R. F., Chairman, 
Lieut. Com. Chas. Svensson, U. S. N. R. F., and Lieut. M. S. Davis, U. S. N. 

George J. Vanderslice, Recorder. 
F. Kariger, Pilot in charge, Lighthouse Subdivision, Gatun. 
Comdr. Edwin G. Kintner, Naval Constructor, U. S. N., Superintendent of Mechan- 
ical Division, Balboa. 
Wm. J. Auten, Mechanical Engineer, Mechanical Division, Balboa. 
Wm. H. Stone, General Foreman, Cristobal Shops, Cristobal 



Supply Department. 

Headquarters, Balboa Heighta. 

.. K. Morris, Chief Quartermaster. 
Roy R. Watson, Superintendent. 

J. J. Jackson, General Manager, Commissary Division, Cristobal. 
M. D. Smith, General Storekeeper, Balboa. 
W. B. Brown, Superintendent, Cattle Industry, Cristobal. 

B. C. Poole, District Quartermaster, Ancon-Balboa, Balboa Heights 
J. M. King, District Quartermaster, Cristobal. 

Stanley Ford, District Quartermaster, Gatun. 

C. Peters, District Quartermaster, Pedro Miguel. 



Accounting Department. 

Headquarter», Balboa Heigbta 

H. A. A. Smith, Auditor. 

Elwyn Greene, Assistant Auditor on the Isthmus 
John H. McLean. Paymaster 
T. L. Clear. Collector 



120 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Health Department. 

Headquarters, Balboa Heights. 

Col. H. C. Fisher, U. S. A., Chief Health Officer. 
Dr. Henry Hanson, Assistant Chief Health Officer. 
Dr. Dalferes P. Curry, Chief Sanitary Inspector. 
Surgeon S. B. Grubbs, U. S. P. H. S., Chief Quarantine Officer. 
Col. L. T. Hess, U. S. A., Superintendent. Ancon Hospital, Ancon. 

, Superintendent, Colon Hospital, Cristobal. 

Dr. Louis Wender, Superintendent. Corozal Hospital. Corozal. 
Maj. E. A. Bocock, Superintendent, Santo Tomas Hospital (Panama), Ancon. 
Capt. Henry Goldthwaite, U. S. A., Health Officer of Panama, Ancon. 
Capt. Jesse L. Byrd, U. S. A., Health Officer of Cristobal-Colon, Cristobal 



Courts. 
John W. Hanan, District Judge, Ancon. 

E. M. Goolsby, Clerk, Ancon. 

Wm. B. Cheatham, Clerk, Cristobal. 
J. W. Blackburn, Magistrate, Balboa. 
John W. Thompson, Magistrate, Cristobal. 



The Panama Canal In the United States. 

Headquarters, Washington, D. C. 
L. Flint, General Purchasing Officer and Chief of Office, Washington, D. C. 
E. D. Anderson, Chief Clerk, Purchasing Department, Washington, D. C 
Ray L. Smith, Assistant to the Chief of Office, Washington, D. C. 
B. F. Harrah, Assistant Auditor, Washington, D. C. 
R. E. Rutherford, Assistant Purchasing Agent, 24 State Street, New York, 

N. Y. 
A. S. Perry, Assistant Purchasing Agent, New Orleans, La. 
W. A. E. Doying, Inspecting Engineer, Washington, D. C. 



Panama Railroad Company. 

Col. Chester Harding, U. S. A., President, Balboa Heights. 
Lt.-Col. J. J. Morrow, U. S. A., Second Vice President, Balboa Heights. 
Samuel W. Heald, Superintendent, Balboa Heights. 

Robert Beverley, Assistant to Superintendent. 

W. F. Foster, Master of Transportation, Balboa Heights. 

M. B. Connolly, Roadmaster, Balboa Heights. 

R. B. Walker, Receiving and Forwarding Afrent, Cristobal. 

T. W. McFarlane, Superintendent, Coaling Plants, Cristobal. 
Frank Feuille, Counsel, Ancon. 

Walter F. Van Dame, Assistant to the Counsel and Land Agent, Ancon. 



Office in the United States, U State Street, Nev> York City. 

. A. Drake, First Vice President, New York, N. Y. 
Sylvester Deming, Treasurer, New York. 

T. H. Rossbottom, Secretary, and Assistant to Vice President, New York. 
V. M. Newton, Auditor, New York. 
Richard Reid Rogers, General Counsel, New York. 
A. E. Paterson, Freight Agent, New York. 
C. C. Van Riper, Passenger Agent, New York. 
H. I. Bawden, Terminal Superintendent, New York. 
R. E. Rutherford, Commissary Purchasing Agent, New York. 
A. S. Perry. Assisrrmr Commissary Purchasing Agent, New Orleans, La. 



Joint Commission. 

Hon. Manuel' Walls y Merino, Umpire, Panama City, and Ancon. 
Federico Boyd, Member, Panama City. 
George A. Connolly, Member, Ancon. 
Julio J. Fabrega, Member, Panama City. 
Burt New, Member, Ancon. 

Mian G. E Bliag. Secrfltanr 





THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50: address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 22, 1919. No. 10. 

Expenses of Operation and Maintenance Compared with Revenues. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919, the ordinary expenses 
for the operation and maintenance of the Canal, including those of 
civil government and sanitation, amounted to $6,112,194.77, as com- 
pared with $5,920,342.94 in 1918 and $6,788,047.67 for the year 1917. 
Overhead charges included in the cost of operation and maintenance 
in the year 1919 amounted to $3,382,167.30, and include expenses of 
civil government, hospitals, quarantine, and sanitation, the Executive 
Department, the Accounting Department, the Washington Office, 
operation and repairs of storehouses and quarters, lighting of streets, 
operation of water and sewer systems and roads, etc. 

Offsetting the total expenses for operation and maintenance are 
the amounts earned for tolls on vessels passing through the Canal, 
$6,156,118.95; licenses and taxes, court fees, and fines, $136,870.77; 
and profits on business operations, $61,027.26, a total of $6,354,016.98. 

The revenues earned in excess of current expenses were accordingly 
$241,822.21. The charges for operation and maintenance do not in- 
clude, with minor exceptions, any allowance for depreciation of plant 
and equipment, nor do they include any interest charges on the cap- 
ital investment. The actual cost of the Canal projects estimated for 
in 1908 up to June 30, 1919, is figured at $365,415,985.18, which may 
be considered as the capital investment on that date. 

Including expenditures in previous years, the aggregate of expendi- 
tures charged to operation and maintenance of the Canal to June 30, 
1919, was $30,109,494.46. The revenues offsetting this amounted to 
$25,490,803.71, less approximately $75,000 yet to be refunded on ac- 
count of erroneous collection of tolls. The recorded deficit in opera- 
tion and maintenance for the period of Canal operation to June 30, 
1919, was therefore $4,618,690.75 plus about $75,000, or approximately 
$4,693,690.75. 

The cost of operation and maintenance and the revenues earned 
during the period of Canal operation, with the variations in the deficit 
in this account, are shown in this statement: 



Fiscal year. 


Maintenance and 

operation, includ- 

ins proportion 

of overhead. 


Revenues. 


Revenues 

in excess of 

expenses. 


Expenses 

in excess of 

revenues. 


Excess of 

revenues over 

expenses to 

date. 


Excess of 

expenses over 

revenues to 

date. 


1914 


$166,030.91 
4,123,128.09 
6,999,750.15 
6,788,047.60 
5,920,342.94 
6,112,194.77 


$14,618.68* 
4,343,383.69 
2,558.542.38t 
5,808,398.70 
6,411.843 28 
6.354,016.98 




$151,412.23 




$151,412 23 


1915 


$220,255.60 


$68,843.37 


1916 


4,441,207.77 
979,648.90 


4,519.177,92 
5,352 013,30 
4,860,512.96 
4,618,690.75 


1917 






1918 


491,500.34 
241,822.21 




1919 














30.109,494 46 


25,490,803.71 


953.578 15 


5,572,268.90 




4,618,690.75 



•Tolls on barges towed through the Canal, prior to opening to commercial ships. 
tHeavy drop due to closing Canal 6 months on account of slides. 

Had the original Panama Canal rules of measurement and collec- 
tion been used, the deficit of $4,618,690.75 as of June 30, 1919, would 



122 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



have been reduced to $954,919.05. The loss through not applying 
the Canal rules alone, but limiting the collections by the proviso that 
the amount collectible shall not exceed the equivalent of that obtained 
by multiplying the net tonnage as determined by measurement for 
registry in the United States by $1.25, amounted to $3,663,771.70 to 
the end of the fiscal year 1919. By fiscal years the losses, counting 
the refunds made so far, have been: 



Fiscal year. 


Difference in 

tolls actually 

collected. 


Refunds made 
later for excess 
collections dur- 
ing years. 


Total. 


1914 








1915 




$165,457.71 

22,110.46 

17,382.47 

8,701.09 

284.35 


$165,457.71 


1916 


S390.714.05 

1,034,001.88 

1,083,111.69 

867,526.48 


412,824.51 


1917 '. 


1,051,384.35 


1918 


1,091,812.78 


1919 


867.810.83 






Totals 


3.375.354.10 


213,936.08 


3,589,290.18 



Adding to $3,589,290.18 the sum of $74,481.52 due to be refunded, 
disbursement of which had not been effected to the close of the fiscal 
year 1919, gives a total loss to July 1, 1919, of $3,663,771.70. 

On the other hand, the provision that tolls on ships in ballast shall 
not be less-than the equivalent of 75 cents per net ton, United States 
registry measurement, though levied on the basis of 72 cents per net 
ton, Panama Canal measurement, has resulted in slight gains to the 
Canal. Additional collections made under this ruling during the 
fiscal years 1918 and 1919 amounted to $930.94, or slightly over two- 
fifths of 1 per cent of the refunds made during the same period on 
account of the change of rules. 

These additional collections have in practically all cases been ab- 
sorbed in the refunds, by deducting them from the amount due an 
operator as a refund. The checks drawn to pay refunds have accord- 
ingly represented the actual loss to the Canal under the changed sys- 
tem, which effects losses on most loaded vessels and gains on a part 
of those in ballast. 

Authority to pay the refunds was contained in an Act of Congress 
dated June 12, 1917. The following table shows the refunds made to 
July 1, 1919, to various operators, as distributed among the fiscal 
years in which transit was made by the vessels for which refunds were 
allowed : 



Operator. 


1915. 


1916. 


1917. 


1918. 


1919. 


Total. 


W. R. Grace & Co 


$12,803.41 

7,442.50 

622,55 

360 00 

8,855.25 


$723 11 


$338 . 75 






$13,865.27 








7,442.50 


E.J. Dodge Co 










622.55 












360.00 












8,855.25 










$3 60 


3.60 


Norton Lillv & Co 


7,693,02 
5,997.45 
1,529.50 
15,517.65 
6,542.70 
2,765.05 
9,632.10 


.'.,922.35 
713.75 
682.50 
548.75 


25.00 




13,640.37 








6,711.20 










2,212.00 










16,066 40 










6,542 70 


Dodwell & Co 


255,85 








3,020.90 




6.25 
407.50 




276.75 


9,915.10 






407 50 




10,134.00 


27.50 






10,161.60 




1,275.30 






1,275.30 




11 80 








11.80 


United States & Australia S. S. Co. 


496 25 










496.25 




3,096 65 
6,288 65 
1.276.00 
1.341 25 
6,331.05 
29,154 05 










3,096.65 












6.288.65 












1,276.90 












1,341.25 




2,758.05 
2,439.20 








9,089.10 






$127.50 




31.720.75 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



123 



Operator. 


1915. 


1916. 


1917. 


1918. 


1919. 


Total. 


British Admiralty 


$7,209.19 










$7,209.19 


International Banking Corporation 




$25.92 
6 25 


$38.16 




Commercial National Bank 


1,300 75 

984 10 

274.35 

65 15 




6 25 


Union Oil Company 








Swayne & Hoyt 










984 10 


Hinds, Rolph A Co 












J. R. Hanifv 










65 15 


M. E.Kinsley 








$4 00 




Booth & Co 






17.50 
10.80 




17 50 


Barr, Crombie Co 












Tatem Steam Navigation Co 






1,042.13 




1 01 9 13 


Golden Gate S. S. Co 


065 45 

10,733.63 

5,129 35 

802.80 

395 06 






665 45 


Payne <4 Wardlaw 


$1,057.00 
2,602.00 
4,380.40 


* 






11 790 63 


Anglo- American S. S. Co 








7 731 35 




15,269.20 


7,493.30 




27,945 70 


McBeth & Co 














Totals 


165,457.71 


22,110 46 


17,382.47 


8,701.09 


284.35 


213,936 08 



The accompanying chart shows graphically the relation, by fiscal 
years, between the expenses of maintenance and operation of the 
Canal, and the revenues derived; and shows also the relation of the 
additional revenue which would have been derived under the appli- 
cation of the Canal rules: 







iqi4 



iqi.5 



iqi6 



1916 



I9»«? 



2k 



6 years. 



{HUD ExPEnSC OF Opcradom «* MJ\iirrENAnc£. 

□ Additional Revenue Undil^ Cahal fti)iE>s 

^ Total De^'C'T Undek Prfsfnt Law. 

CUD Total Deficit Uhoer Canal /Tw_£vS. 



Postal ana Cable Addresses oi The Panama Canal. 

^ Th f £? st £ address ffc „" The Pana.aa Canal. Balboa Heights, Canal Zone." or "The Panama 
Canal, Washington, D. C 

tT? he i !? bie address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal. Panama" in the 
United States, "Pancanal, Washington." 

Mail for ships passing through the Canal or touchinc at either of the terminal porta should be 
addressed to "Cristobal. Canal Zone." 



124 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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126 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending October 18, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo- 


Name of Teasel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 








October 12.... 


Tons. 


Tom 
550 


Neptune 






October 12.. . . 




(*) 






October 13.. . . 




435 












12 












3 066 


Middlebury 


Panama Railroad Commissary. 
Pacific Steam Navigation Co 


October 12.. . . 
October 12:... 

October 14.. . 
October 14.. . . 

October 15.. . 
October 15.. . 
October 10.... 
October 18. 


October 15.. . . 
October IS.... 
October 15.. . 
October 15.. . 
October 16.. . 
October 17.... 
October 16.. . . 
October 17.. . 


450 

772 

1.779 

184| 

435 

310 

1,080 

7,000 

3,328 

3 

2.512 


77 
815 




199 


Stuvvesant 

Antonio Lopez 

Alkraaar 

Carrillo 

BaldhiU 


Royal Dutch West India Mail. 

Spanish Line 

Royal Netherlands S. S. Line 

United Fruit Company 

United States Shipping Board 


57 
148 

(*) 

87 
(*) 


Atenas 


I'nited Fruit Company 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 


October 16.... 


245f 











No cargo laded. 



t Pounds. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending October 18, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 


Manavi 


Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Colombia Maritime Co 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 


October 12.. . 
October 12.. . . 


October 12.... 
October 12... 


Tons. 
1 


Ton* 


22 


Ulvsses 




12,017 




October 18.... 
October 18.. .. 


October 18.... 


9 


Guatemala . . . 


October 18.. . . 1 





Changes in Freight Rates to South Pacific Ports. 

The Panama Railroad Steamship Line, with connecting carriers, 
has issued Supplement No. 1 to freight classification and tariff No. 
28, publishing class and commodity rates from New York, N. Y., to 
South Pacific ports in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Chile, effective 
September 30, 1919. Distribution of the supplement has been made 
and additional copies may be obtained from the offices of the line at 
24 State Street, New York, or Balboa Heights, C. Z. 



Distances to Victoria and Prince Rupert. 

In connection with the table of distances recently distributed by 
The Panama Canal, a portion of which was reprinted in The Panama 
Canal Record of October 8, 1919, inquiry has been made as to the 
distances to Victoria and Prince Rupert, British Columbia. The 
distance from the Pacific terminal of the Canal to Victoria is stated 
by the Hydrographic Office of the Navy Department to be 3,962 
nautical miles, and that to Prince Rupert, 4,425 nautical miles. 

The distance saved by the Canal in the voyage to these ports, as 
well as Vancouver, from Liverpool is 5,666 nautical miles; from 
Hamburg and Antwerp, 5,528 miles; from Bordeaux, 5,376 miles; 
and from Gibraltar, 4,950 miles. Between the British Columbian 
ports and representative United States ports, the savings are as fol- 
lows: Portland, Me., 7,651 miles; Boston, 7,661 miles; New York, 
7,873 miles; Philadelphia, 7,948 miles; Baltimore and Norfolk, 
8,020 miles; Charleston, 8,234 miles; Savannah, 8,267 miles; Jack- 
sonville, 8,301 miles; Mobile, 8,839 miles; New Orleans, 8,873 miles; 
and Galveston, 8,946 miles. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 127 

Admission to Docks. 
The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 4, 1919. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

The following regulations, governing the admission to piers and docks are hereby 
published for your information and guidance: 

1. Admission to piers or docks (Cristobal and Balboa) shall be limited strictly 
to persons having legitimate business thereon. 

2. Legitimate business necessitating admission to piers or docks is recognized in 
the following cases: 

(a) Officials of The Panama Canal or Panama Railroad, or officers of the Army or 
Navy, whose duties of a supervisory character require visits on their part from time 
to time to piers and docks. 

(b) Officials of the Republic of Panama, or members of the diplomatic corps and 
consular service (United States and foreign). 

(c) Employees of the United States, The Panama Canal or Panama Railroad, whose 
duties require routine visits to piers and docks. 

(d) Representatives of shipping interests or other responsible commercial estab- 
lishments whose duties necessitate frequent visits to piers and docks. 

(e) Contractors, or subcontractors (and their gangs) and employees of shipping 
or other responsible commercial concerns whose work requires habitual admission 
to piers and docks. 

(/) Officers and crews of Army, Navy, and merchant vessels lying in port. 

3. Identification under each of the foregoing headings shall be established in the 
following manner. 

(c), (Jb), (c) and (/) above referred to upon proper identification by police officer 
at the main entrance. 

Representatives of shipping and commercial interests, and contractors or sub- 
contractors and their foremen will be admitted upon annual pass issued by the Exec- 
utive Secretary upon recommendation of the Captain of the Port after consultation 
with the Receiving and Forwarding Agent, the Chief Customs Inspector, and the 
Police District Commander. Silver gangs of the above concerns shall be checked in 
by their timekeepers or foremen at the main entrance. 

Silver employees of the United States Government, The Panama Canal or Panama 
Railroad, shall be checked in at the main entrance by timekeeper or foreman. 

4. Persons not mentioned in the foregoing are denied entrance to piers and docks, 
except under special circumstances, which, in the opinion of the Captain of the 
Port, justify the issuance of a single trip permit, or in exceptional cases, of a permit 
for a reasonable period. 

The Receiving and Forwarding Agent shall issue such passes as may be necessary 
in connection with his duties. 

The Chief Customs Inspector at each port shall issue such passes as may be nec- 
essary in connection with his duties. 

All persons visiting the docks (with proper pass) as escorts or companions of 
arriving or departing passengers shall keep clear of the dock aprons and of ship's 
gangways, and such persons must confine themselves strictly to the dock sheds. 

Outgoing passengers will be permitted to embark at all hours, but vessels upon 
which such passengers have previously obtained transportation shall be required to 
receive them on board immediately after their admission within the dock area. 

All traffic, excepting employees of the United States Government, The Panama 
Canal and Panama Railroad traveling on official business to and from the coaling 
plant at Cristobal, must enter and leave via the main entrance at the Terminal 
Building. 

5. At the Cristobal Terminal all outgoing steamer freight originating in the cities 
of Cristobal and Colon shall be delivered through the Local Freight House. Delivery 
at ship's side by private carrier is prohibited. 

Incoming freight destined to the cities of Cristobal and Colon may be received 
at the team track at the main entrance upon proper pass issued by the Receiving 
and Forwarding Agent. 

At the Balboa Terminal outgoing and incoming steamer freight shall be handled 
in accordance with The Panama Canal Tariff as published from time to time. 

Regulations governing the admission of duly licensed baggage wagons and carts 
to the dock area, and appropriate to the conditions obtaining locally at their respec- 
tive terminals, shall be established by a board composed of the Captain of the Port, 
the Receiving and Forwarding Agent, the Chief Customs Officer, and the Police 
District Commander, in accordance with the principles stated herein. 



128 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

6. Panama Canal, Panama Railroad, Army, Navy, and private trucks- delivering 
supplies or delivering and receiving baggage from vessels moored to the dock, will 
be permitted to enter the dock area and dock sheds under the supervision of the dock 
foreman. 

Public vehicles will be permitted to enter the dock area only when carrying a pas- 
senger or passengers entitled (under the foregoing rules) to admission to such area, 
or (without a passenger or passengers) at a reasonable time prior to the anticipated 
arrival of a passenger vessel. One driver only will be permitted to enter in each ve- 
hicle. Such vehicles, after having been passed into the area, may remain there 
awaiting other fares during daylight hours only. All such vehicles in the area await- 
ing fares shall park in locations indicated by the police or the dock foreman. Drivers 
will not be permitted to leave their vehicles at any time. 

7. Private vehicles may enter the dock area when occupied by a person or per- 
sons duly authorized to enter. 

8. No passenger vehicle of any description shall be permitted to enter the dock 
sheds without proper pass from the Receiving and Forwarding Agent, and then only 
under the supervision of the dock foreman. 

9. The speed of all vehicles entering the dock area must not exceed 12 miles per 
hour, and within the dock shed.; not exceed 4 miles an hour. 

10. In the event of fire within the dock area, the fire-fighting apparatus and per- 
sonnel shall be allowed unimpeded admission to the dock area and to the dock sheds. 
The same rule shall govern the admission of equipment and personnel for relief 
work in the event of emergencies in general. 

11. The improper or unnecessary use of any dock pass shall be considered sufficient 
cause for its revocation. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number ofjqualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal 
post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, 
Balboa Heights (telephone 286) : 

Stenographer, typist, and stenographer-typiat, Departmental Service (male and female); $1,100 
for typists, and $1,200 a year for stenographers and stenographer-typists; No. 807-amended; 
December 7, 1919; form 304; age, at least 18 years. 

Senior structural engineer. Grade 1 (male), $3,000 to $4,000 a year; senior structural engineer. Grade 
2 (male), $1,800 to $2,700 a year; senior mechanical engineer, Grade 2 (male), $1,800 to $2,700 a year; 
(Interstate Commerce Commission) ; No. 504; form 1312; age, less than 60 years. t 

Printer (male and female), bookbinder (male), pressman (male), electrotyper-finisher (male), elec- 
trotyper-molder (male), stereotyper (male); 75 cents an hour; No. 462-amended; forms 304 and 
1745, 304 and 2109, 304 and 2165, 304 and 1747, 304 and 1747, 304 and 1747, respectively; age. at 
least 20 years. + 

Tariff clerk (male); $1,200 to $1,500 a year; No. 329-amended; November 23, 1919; form 1312; 
age, at least 21 years but under 50 years. 

Biological assistant (male), $1,440 to $1,800 a year; No. 483; November 11, 1919; form 2118; age, 
at least 20 years but under 45 years.* 

Assistant in cotton testing (male); Grade 1, $1,800 to $2,400 a year, Grade 2, $1,200 to $1,800 a year; 
No. 255; November 18, 1919; form 2118; age, under 45 years.* 

Metallographist (male); $7.60 per diem; No. 508; November 25, 1919; form 2118; age, under 
40 years.* 

Junior mechanical engineer (male); Engineer Department at Large; $1,800 to $2,000 a year; No. 501; 
November 11, 1919; form 1312; age, no limits.* 

Lithographer (male); $1,000 a year; No. 498; November 11, 1919; form 304; age, at least 20 
years.* 

Chief metallurgical chemist (male); $3,000 a year; assistant chief metallurgical chemist (male); 
$8.80 a day; metallurgical chemist (male and female); $6.00 a day; assistant metallurgical chemist 
(male and female); $5.12 a day; November 25, 1919; age, no limits; form 1312.* 

Assistant economist (male and female); $1,800 to $2,700 a year; December 14, 1919; form 1312; 
age, at least 25 but under 45 years. 

Agent for agricultural education (male); $3,000 to $3,500 a year; agent for trade and industrial 
education (male); $3,000 to $3,500 a year; December 2, 1919.* 

Highway engineer (male); $1,800 to $2,400 a year; November 11, 1919; age, under 35 years.* 

Hospital interne (male); $100 a month with subsistence, quarters, and laundry; November 23, 
1919. 

The following examinations are closed: 

Master gage expert (male); $2,000 to $3,600; gage inspector (male); $1,800 to $2,400; assistant gage 
inspector (male); $1,200 to $1,800; gage inspector's helper (male and female); $900 to $1,320; assistant 
in marketing, Grade 1 (male); $1,800 to $2,400; cement tester (male); $900 to $1,200. 



(*) Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing appli- 
cations, and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing 
business on that date. 

(t) Nonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



129 



Official Circulars. 



Acting Member of Board of Local Inspectors. 

The Panama Canal. 
Executive Office. 
Balboa Heights. C. Z.. October IS. 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective this date, Capt. 
John Weishofer will act as Member of the 
Board of Local Inspectors, in addition to his 
duties as Assistant Captain of the Port, Cristobal. 
Chester Harding. 

Governor. 



Reduced Fares for Government Employees 
and Members of their Families. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., October 16, 1919. 
Circular RA-660: 

To all \concerned — 1 . Effective at once and 
until further notice, "U. S." tickets, both single 
trip (designated as "SS") and round trip (desig- 
nated "S"), will be sold to employees of The 
Panama Canal and Pai.ama Railroad Company 
on the gold roll, and their families and to all 
others entitled to rates granted employees, as 
well as to officers and enlisted men of the United 
States Army and Navy in uniform. "U. S." 
tickets will also be sold to families and visiting 
relatives and friends of officers and enlisted men 
of the United States Army and Navy upon presen- 
tation of half-rate requests. 

2. At stations where no "U. S." tickets are 
provided, half-rate simplex tickets S76-A and 
576-D will be sold. 

3. Persons entitled to the tickets specified 
above, boarding trains at nonagency stations or 
after regular stations are closed, will be charged 
half the regular tariff rate. Minimum cash fare 
on trains will be 10 cents United States currency, 
except between Pedro Miguel and Paraiso, and 
Culebra and Empire, where the charge will be 5 
cents United States currency. 

4. Effective Monday, October 20, 1919, the 
special rate SI. 50 Sunday and holiday round trip 
ticket will be sold at regular stations every day, 
to employees of The Panama Canal and the 
Panama Railroad Company on the gold roll and 
to their families, and to all others entitled to 
rates granted employees, including officers and 
enlisted men of the United States Army and Navy 
in uniform. The going portion will be good only 
on regular trains on date of sale. The return por- 
tion may be used not later than the last regular 
train leaving a terminal on the day following the 
date of sale, except that when a Sunday and holi- 
day occur together, the return portion of tickets 
sold on the day immediately preceding the two 
days, will be honored not later than on the last 
regular train leaving a terminal on the second of 
the two days. 

5. No baggage will be checked on the special 
round trip tickets and no refunds will be made for 
unused portions thereof. 

6. All persons, civilian and military, boarding 
trains without transportation at regular stations 
open for business, will be charged full tariff 
rates plus 10 cents. 

7. All persons requesting or being furnished with 
transportation, at reduced rate herein authorized, 
shall properly identify themselves to ticket sellers, 
collectors, or trainmen, either by producing 
commissary identification card, photo-metal 
check, or other proper authority issued by the 
Executive Office or by the Superintendent of the 
Panama Railroad, and shall otherwise be subject 
to the rules and regulations of the company in 
effect at the time. 

H. A. A. Smith. 
Approved: Auditor, The Panama Canal. 

W. F. Foster, 

Actg. Supt., Panama Railroad Co. 
Approved : 
Chester Harding, 

President. Panama Railroad Co. 



Foreman's Orders for Nonexpendable Prop- 
erty, on Commissaries. 

The Panama Canal. 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 11, 1919. 
Circular No. 216: 

The Governor's circular No. 656-13 and Audi- 
tors circular No. 188, were issued for the purpose 
of allowing nonexpendable property to be issued 
from commissary stock only when the articles 
desired are not obtainable in Supply Department 
storehouse, and are available for issue from the 
commissary on which the order is drawn. 

The foreman's orders should constitute both an 
order and a receipt for the property and cover cases 
only where immediate delivery is made. 

The commissary invoice issued and sent to this 
office should cover every item on the foreman's 
order. The foreman's order should not be left 
open to have an additional issue made to be 
covered by an additional invoice. Items on 
foreman's orders not filled immediately, should 
be crossed off. 

The original foreman's order, as drawn, and the 
foreman's order as filled, should be compared as 
required by Auditor's circular No. 181. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 
Approved: 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Count of Mall Handled by Post Offices. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office. 
Balboa Heights. C. Z., October 13, 1919. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

For statistical purposes a count of all mail 
handled by Canal Zone post offices will be made 
during the period October 16 to November 15, 
inclusive. You are therefore directed to issue the 
necessary instructions so that all outgoing mail 
during this period will be delivered to or handed 
in at post offices as often as possible. 

The cooperation of all departments and divisions 
will relieve considerably the congestion at post 
offices and will insure the dispatch of all mail 
without delay. 

By direction of the Governor. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Final Issue of Commissary Books. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 17, 1919. 

To all concerned — As it has been ascertained 
that practically all employees have a sufficient 
amount earned as of the 24th of each month to 
cover their monthly needs for commissary books, 
the following regulations will govern: 

Effective at once the issue of commissary books 
on the 4-day period ending the 24th day of the 
month will be the final issue to all employees each 
month. 

Foremen and timekeepers are directed to notify 
the employees under their jurisdiction that this 
rule will be strictly adhered to. 

Employees should provide themselves with 
sufficient books on this final issue to last until 
the first issue of the following month. 

Timekeepers when taking orders for books for 
the period ending the 24th must call the attention 
of all employees to the fact that no further re- 
quests for commissary books will be received 
during that month. 

By direction of the Governor. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



130 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Cable Notice. 
Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October IS, 1919. 
Circular No. 1397: 

To agents and operators — The following in- 
formation has been received from the Central 
and South American Telegraph and Cable Com- 
pany: 

"Communication with Guam and Philippines 
via San Francisco and wireless restored subject 
to delay." 

W. J. Bissell, 
Acting Master of Transportation. 

Appointment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Dept. of Operation and Maintenance, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 14, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective October 16, 1919, 
Mr. George W. Green is appointed Superintend- 
ent of the Southern Municipal District, lice 
Mr. R. C. Hardman, transferred. 

D. E. Wright, 
Municipal Engineer. 

Increase in Cost of Meal Tickets. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. October 17, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective November 1, 1919, 
the cost of 30-cent and 40-cent rations at all silver 
messes will be increased to 40 and 50 cents. 

The 40-cent ticket will continue to be used for 
the 40-cent ration. The present stock of 30-cent 
tickets have been stamped "FIFTY CENTS" 
and will be used for the 50-cent ration. 

All 30-cent tickets should be turned in to this 

office immediately after the first of next month. 

Requisitions for a supply of 50-cent tickets 

should be placed with this office in ample time 

for use on the above effective date. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 



Passenger Accommodations on the "Gen. 
Geo. W. Goethals." 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 18, 1919. 
To all concerned — Owing to delay in sailing of 
our passenger steamers from New York on ac- 
count of the strike, I wish to advise that those who 
desire to secure transportation during the latter 
part of this month, or before arrival of the steam- 
ers which are being detained at New York, can 
obtain passage on the steamship Gen. Geo. W. 
Goethals, which will probably sail from Cristobal 
between October 25 and 29. This ship has 18 
rooms, with two berths and sofa in each room, 
capable of accommodating three adults, two 
rooms with four berths each, and three rooms with 
two berths each. All staterooms are in excellent 
condition, and we can book a total of 68 first-class 
passengers on this steamer. 

W. F. Foster, 
Acting Superintendent. 



Joint Commission. 



Rules of Dismissal. 

In the mailer of the claim of_ Berliv.a Diaz, for 
properlv known as "La Granja," rule of dismissal 
No. 428, docket No. 2723, October 15, 1919— With 
reference to the claim of Bertina Diaz, docket 
No. 2723, the evidence before the Commission 
is that settlement therefor was made by the 
United States on September 9, 1919. 

In view of such settlement, the above claim 
calls for no further action by this Commission 
and said claim is therefore hereby dismissed. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, Ricardo J. Al- 
faro, George A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



In the matter of the claim of Alberto and Fran- 
cisco Guilray. in which rules of default have been 
entered, rule of dismissal No. 430, docket No. 3286, 
October 16, 1919— On April 13, 1916, the Joint 
Commission, with the approval of the two govern- 
ments, parties to the treaty, adopted a rule rela- 
tive to the continuance or dismissal of claims in 
which the claimants are not ready for trial on the 
date their claims are set for-hearing or who fail to 
appear for hearing. This rule provides for the 
entering of a rule of default against claimants who 
fail to appear when called. 

The said rule also provides that: 

"Upon the entry of such rule of default (at the 
end of each month) notice thereof shall be given 
by four successive publications, one each week, 
in the English and Spanish languages, in news- 
papers of general circulation in the Republic of 
Panama, notifying such claimants to appear in 
person or by attorney within sixty (60) days 
from the first of said publications and show good 
and sufficient cause why such default should 
be set aside, and take active steps to prosecute 
their claims, and failing to so appear within 60 
days from said first publication their claims will 
be considered as having been either settled or 
abandoned and the same will be dismissed and 
forever barred." 

In the claim of Alberto and Francisca Guilray, 
docket No. 3286, set for hearing July 30, 1919, 
there was no appearance on the part of claimants 
nor counsel for claimants, and a rule of default 
was accordingly entered against them. 

Due notice having been given as provided for 
in the above-quoted section of the rule of the 
Commission, and there having been no appearance 
by the claimants in person or by counsel during 
the 60-day period fixed in the rule referred to, 
which began on August 7, 1919, the foregoing 
claim against the United States is hereby dis- 
missed and forever barred. 

Federico Boyd, George A. Connolly, Julio 
J. Fabrega, Burt New, Commissioners. 



Award. 

In the matter of the claim of Frank Malcolm 
Briggs, for property located in the District of 
Chagres, award No. 208, docket No. 3598, October 
17, 1919 — An award is hereby made against the 
United States of America in favor of Frank Mal- 
colm Briggs in the sum of $1,000 United States 
currency, for all right, title, and interest the said 
Frank Malcolm Briggs may possess or may have 
possessed in and to the property located on the 
west bank of the Chagres River, between the 
Canal Zone boundary and the mouth of said river, 
within the Republic of Panama, subject of c'aim 
docket No. 3598, including all improvements 
located thereon and any and all damages sustained 
on account of the expropriation of the said prop- 
erty by the United States of America. 

This award shall be paid on or before tne 17th 
day of November, 1919, and if payment or tender 
of payment is not made on or before that date, 
said award shall thereafter bear interest at the 
rate of six per centum per annum until paid. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, Julio J. Fa- 
brega, George A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Polish, shoe, black, Bostonian cream, bot. . $0.16 

Trees, slipper, steel, pr 07 

Cigarettes, Piedmont, 20s pkg 12 

Spare parts for Icy Hot Vacuum Bottles: 

Corks for quart bottles, ea 05 

Corks for pint bottles, ea 05 

Pads for quart and pint bottles, ea 01 

Rings, rubber, for quart bottles, ea 08 

Rings, rubber, for pint bottles, ea 04 

Bowls, sugar, enameled, pt., ea 57 

Knives, table, celluloid handles, ea .79 

Knives, pocket, ea 1 .00 

Knives, pocket, ea. AS 

Knives, pocket, ea. . . .'-. 1 .50 

Pitchers, cream, enameled, J-pt., ea .47 

Pots, tea, individual, enameled* pt., ea... . . .76 

Shakers, salt or pepper, ea,,,,.... ...... , , .15 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, SI. 00 per year; foreign, 81.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 191.3, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal. C. Z. under the Act of March 3, 1S79. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 29, 1919. No. 11. 



Notice to Steamship Lines.— Crew Lists for Incoming Vessels. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 22, 1919. 

1. Circular No. 679-4, dated December 8, 1917, requires that "all vessels entering 
Canal Zone ports, or transiting the Canal, will be required to furnish a correct copy 
of their crew lists to the Quarantine Officer, in addition to the copy which is now fur- 
i.ished the boarding inspector of the Customs Service by vessels stopping at CanaJ 
Zone ports." 

2. In order that these lists may be prepared with mirimum effort in the required 
form, The Panama Canal has prepared a form (No. 1509), "Crew List for Incoming 
Vessels," which may be used when other suitable lists giving the required information 
are not available. This form is being distributed to steamship operators, and addi- 
tional copies may be secured as needed by request made to The Panama Canal, 
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

3. Attention is invited to the fact that this form is designed to give requisite in- 
formation to tie customs and quarantine authorities at the Canal Zone only for in- 
coming ships of all nations. Form 710-A of the Department of Commerce is used at 
the Canal Zone for crew lists of American ships with crews signing on and shipping 
from the Canal Zone, under the supervision of the Deputy Commissioners. 

Chester Harding, Governor, 

Style of Crew Lists for Incoming Vessels. 

The heading of Form 1509, crew list for incoming vessels, referred 
to in the Notice to Steamship Lines published above, is as follows: 
THE PANAMA CANAL 

CREW LIST FOR INCOMING VESSELS. 

Persons composing the crew of the 

(Insert nationality, rig, and name.) 

Front To 

, Canal Zone, , 19 . 



(Place.) 




(Date.) 




Name. 


Capacity 
or duty. 


Birthplace. 


Citizen or 
subject of. 


Age. 













The sheet is 8 by 14 inches, ruled on both sides with |-inch spacing 
and provides space for 91 names. The average crew coming to the 
Canal is composed cf about 80 persons. At the bottom of the reverse 
side of the sheet the cath of the master is provided for, as follows: 

I, Master of said 

do solemnly, sincerely, and truly swear that the within list contains the names 
of all the crew of the said vessel, including detailed men from the Navy, workawaye 
and stowaways, together with the places of their birth, as far as I can ascertain the 
same. 

Master. 

Subscribed and sworn to this day of , 19. . . . before me. 

Sheet No 

Quarantine Officer. 

The use cf Form 15C9 is not compulsory if the required information 
is given on other suitable lists. The form is furnished "in order 
that the lists may be prepared with minimum effort in the required 
form." 



132 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



133 





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134 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Tariff Supplement. 

The Panama Canal has issued supplement No. 1 to Tariff No. 3, as 

follows : 

The Panama Canal, Panama Railroad Company, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 15, 1919. 
The following amendments are made to Tariff No. 3 — Schedule of Rates for Sup- 
plies and Services Furnished to Shipping and Allied Interests at the Panama Canal: 

ITEM 3 — PILOTAGE. 

(Add to paragraph 5). 

Effective October 1, 1919. No charge for pilotage will be made against a vessel 
solely on account of its acceptance or delivery of mails originating in or destined for 
the Canal Zone or the Republic of Panama. 

ITEM 4 — HANDLING LINES. 

4. Effective October 1, 1919. If for reasons other than the fault of The Panama 
Canal, a vessel fails to start through the Canal on the day the men for handling lines 
are placed on board such vessel, a charge of $1 per man will be made in addition 
to the regular charge of $3.50 per man for the transit of the Canal. 

ITEM 22 — FUEL AND DIESEL OILS. 

1. Effective October 15, 1919. Fuel oil per barrel of 42 gallons, delivered to ves- 
sels at either Cristobal or Balboa, $1.50. 

3. Effective September 3, 1919. Pumping oil into and out of private tanks, 4 
cents per barrel. Oil having a viscosity in excess of 225 Engler degrees at 86° Fah- 
renheit will not be handled by Panama Canal oil plants and permission for storage 
thereof will not be granted. 

The General Storekeeper at Balboa should be advised as to the approximate dates 
that steamers are due to arrive with oil either at Cristobal or Balboa, so that neces- 
sary arrangements may be made for handling. 

ITEM 37 — CUSTOMS FEES. 

2. In order to facilitate the discharge of passengers from vessels after the usual 
working hours at the terminal ports of the Canal, the following additional customs 
regulations are hereby established, effective September 1, 1919: 

(a) The Bureau of Customs shall furnish customs inspectors for inspection of pas- 
sengers' baggage between the hours of 6 p. m. and 7 a. m. and on Sundays and holi- 
days, only upon the request of the master or authorized agent of any vessel calling 
at the ports of Balboa and Cristobal. 

(b) A charge will be made for such services against the vessel for which the service 
is rendered on the basis of $5 for each customs inspector engaged between the hours 
of 6 p. m. and lip. m., or fraction thereof, on any work day, and $10 for each inspec- 
tor engaged after 11 p. m.; and for service on Sundays and holidays a charge of $10 
will be made for each inspector engaged between the hours of 7 a. m. and 6 p. in. 
and 6 p. m. and lip. m. 

(c) The number of customs inspectors who may be required to inspect passengers' 
baggage of any vessel will be determined by the Chief Customs Inspectors, or desig- 
nated "subordinate officers, based on their information and knowledge of the require- 
ments. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor, The Panama Canal. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Beginning of Pacific Mail Company Coastwise Service Through the Canal. 

The steamship Point Bonita, passing through the Canal on October 
26, on the way from Baltimore to San Francisco, is making the first 
voyage in a new coastwise service established by the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company, which thus resumes Atlantic traffic after an ab- 
sence of nearly a quarter of a century. In the new service a ship will 
sail in each direction every three weeks. From Baltimore the route 
will be via Habana and Puerto Colombia to Cristobal, thence through 
the Canal and along the Pacific Coast to San Francisco, with calls at 
the principal Central American ports; on the eastbound voyage the 
route will be the reverse. Four new oil-burning steamships will be 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



135 



employed in the service. They are the Point Judith, Point Bonita, 
Point Adams, and Point Lobos. No passengers will be carried, but 
passengers will continue to be carried on the regular service between 
Cristobal and San Francisco, which began on April 16, 1916, when the 
southern terminus was made Cristobal instead of Balboa, and was an 
extension through the Canal of a service which had been operating on 
the Pacific for nearly half a century. 

The Atlantic line of the Pacific Mail, operating in the early 90's 
and connecting with the Pacific line by means of the Panama Railroad, 
was discontinued under an agreement with the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, then a privately owned corporation, dated December 16, 1S95. 
The Panama Railroad Company ceased the operation of the direct 
line of steamers which it had operated between Panama and San 
Francisco, and the Pacific Mail discontinued the operation of its line 
between New York and Colon, which had run in competition with 
the Panama Railroad Company's line on the Atlantic. 



Forty Wooden Ships for France. 

The Canal is being used for the passage of 40 wooden vessels built 
in British Columbia for the French Government. Thirteen have passed 
through the Canal to date. They have been chartered by the 
British Government, and on their maiden voyages are carrying lumber 
to Great Britain, though it is expected that they will ultimately be 
used in the coasting trade of France. Twenty of the ships are twin 
screw steamers of 3,000 tons, and the other half are of approximately 
1,500 tons, and are of the type which the French call barge. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristotal for Week Ending October 25, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 
« 


Discharged 


Laded. 








October 20.. . . 


Tom. 


Torus. 
1 026 


Jamaica 

Peru 

Cartago 

MiiMlcbury 

Ti vivos 

Teviot 


Pacific Steam : '<> 

Navigation Co 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Companv 


October !!).. . 
October 10 
October 20.. . . 
October 20.. . . 

October 22.... 


October 24.... 

October 22. . 
October 22. . . 
October 2:;.. . , 
October 23. . 


765 
2, 295 
(*) 

400 




201 J 
(t) 
120 
411 

52 
9 371 




United States Shipping Board. 






6,410 

12,013' 
1,568 

9,900 

1,222 






October 23... . 


October 24.... 
October 25.. . . 


27 




Panama Railroad Steamship line. 

! i i ed Fruit Company 

Huaatica Petroleum Co 

Pacifii Steam Navigation Co 


(t) 




- 24.. . . 








October 24.... 










October 24.... 


838 




Pacific Steam Navigation Co 






28 
2,583 
1,365 












Antillian 


Levland Steamshin Line 









* No cargo discharged. 



tNo cargo laded. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending October 25, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged Laded. 


Jamaica 

Jamaica 


tion Co 

Peruvian Steamship Company., 


October 19.... 
October 23.. . . 

October 25, 


October 19, 

r 23.. . . 


Tom. 
1 


Tom. 
1 
13 


Cauca 


October 24.... 
October 25 . . . 


1 
1 




Uruhnmb* 





136 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Prices of Ccal. 

The following prices of coal in various ports of the world are quoted 
on the basis of information published in Nauticus, issue of September 
27, 1919. The prices were supplied to Nauticus by Messrs. Willard, 
Sutherland & Co., bunkering contractors, as of September 15. For 
quotations in other than United States currency the equivalent values 
in United States currency have been added for normal exchange and 
for present rates of exchange. The value of current exchange is taken 
from a statement issued by the Guaranty Trust Company of New York 
under date of September 20, 1919, with the exception of the rupee, on 
which exchange is as quoted by the American Foreign Banking Cor- 
poration on October 4. Separate quotations were made by the banks 
on exchange of gold, silver, and bank notes; the figures for bank notes 
were taken for this tabulation, as it is believed transactions would not 
normally be made in gold or silver coin. Where more than one price 
is quoted for a port the exchange has been calculated on the lowest rate. 

Prices at Balboa and Cristobal for ships passing through the Canal 
are $11.50 per ton; for ships calling at the terminal ports without 
passing through the Canal, $11.50 at Cristobal and $13.50 at Balboa. 
Prices at the other ports quoted are as follows: 

FOREIGN PORTS. 



Prices at ports outside of the United States and Cr 


inada are given 


below: 






Foreign ports 
quotation. 


Value in 
U. S. cur- 
rency, nor- 
mal ex- 
change. 


Value in 
U. S. cur- 
rency, pres- 
ent ex- 
change. 




125s 

137s 6d 

115s 

115s 

125s 

75s to 80s 

?0c6d 

50s to 60s 

90s 

51s to 55s 

S5s bd 

100s 

105s 6d 

75s to SOs 

60s 


$30.37$ 

33.41 

27.941 

27. 94 h 

30.37* 

18.22} 

21.99 

12.15 

21.87 

12.39 

20 77V 

24.30 

25.63V 

18.221. 

14.58 


$26.25 




27 50 




23 00 




23.00 


Port Said 


28.25 




15.00 


Southampton 


18.10 
10 00 




18.00 


Hull 


10.20 




n.io 




20.00 




21.10 


Cardiff 


15.00 




12.00 








Kr. 145 

140s lOd 

Kr. 175 

70 Guilders 

70 Guilders 

105s 


38.86 
34.22 
46.90 
28.14 
28 14 
25.51| 


31.17} 




28.16} 




41.12} 




25.90 




25.90 




21.00 
















130 Pesetas 

125s 

103s 6d 

117s 6d 

117s 6d 

117s 6d 

102s 6d 

102s 6d 

101s 6d 

101s 6d 

$20.00 

$22.00 

152s (3d 

1 155s 

155s 

147s 6d 
149s 
145s 
1 45s 
145s 


25.08 

30.37V. 

25.15 

28.55 

28.55 

28.55 

24.90 

24.90 

24.66 

24.66 

20.00 

22.00 

37.055 

37.66V 

37.661 

37.661 

35.84 

36.20', 

35.23V 

35. 23 } 

35.23V 


24.37} 




26.25 




20.70 




23.50 




23.50 




23.50 




20.50 




20 50 




20 30 


St. Thomas, V. I 


20.30 
20 00 


Curacao, D.W.I 


22 00 
30 50 




31.00 




31.00 




31 00 




29.50 




29.80 




29.00 




29 00 




29.00 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



137 



Coronel 

DelaL-ao Bay 

Port Natal 

Cape To« n 

Dakar 

Singapore 

Colombo 

Aden 

Bombay 

Karachi 

Port Keirbla... 

Adelaide 

Albany 

Fremantle 

Melbourne 

Sydney 

Sydney Harbor 





Value in 


Value is 




U. S. cur- 


U. S. cur- 


Foreien ports 


rency, nor- 


rency, pre* 


quotations. 


mal ex- 


ent ex- 




change. 


change. 


65s to 70s 


$15,793 


$13.00 


33s 6d 


8 04 


6.70 


35s 6d to 37a 


8.62J 


7.10 


43s lOd to 48s 4d 


10.65 


8.76} 


117s 


28 43 


23 98} 


81s to 91s 


19 68 


16.20 


75a to 81s 6d 


18.22J 


15. 0* 


102s 6d to 105a 


24 90 


20.5* 


26-8-0 Kupees 


8 42 


ii. ie 


24 Rupees 


7.77J 


10 3i 


ISs 


4.37 


3.68 


34s 9d 


9.44 


7.15 


40s 9d 


9.90 


8 33 


40s 9d 


9.90 


8.3d 


29s 9d 


7.22| 


6 09* 


27s 


6 56 


5.53} 


20s 


4.86 


4.19 



AMERICAN PORTS. 

New York, N. Y. ; $6.35 pool 9 and 71, f. a. s. ex lighters. 

Philadelphia, Pa.; $6.50 pool 9 and 71, trimmed, ex lighters. 

Baltimore, Md.: $6.50 pool 9 and 71, trimmed, ex lighters. 

Newport News, Sewall's Point, Lambert's Point, Va.; $6.50 f. o. b. under chutes a) 
coal piers, trimming extra. 

Boston, Mass.; $10.25 t. i. b., ex lighters. 

Charleston, S. C; $6.25 f. o. b. and trimmed, under chutes at coal piers. 

Portland, Me.; $11.50 trimmed ex lighters. 

Wilmington, Del.; $7.90 f. o. b. ex lighters. 

Savannah, Ga.; $6.80 t. i. b. alongside supplier's wharf. 

Jacksonville, Fla.; $9.95 New River- Pocahontas; $8.75 Stonega, t. i. b. alongside 
supplier's wharf. 

Mobile, Ala., $7.50 Sipsey; S6.50 Pratt R/M; f. o. b. alongside supplier's wharl. 

Pensacola, Fla.; $6.26 Cahaba or Black Creek washed; $5.25 Pratt R/M; $5.85 
Cahaba or Black Creek R/M; f. o. b. under chutes at coal piers. 

New Orleans, La.; $7.40 Sipsey; $6.50 Pratt R/M; t. i. b. ex lighters. 

Galveston, Tex.;. $10.50 Oklahoma Steam Coal; f. o. b. at supplier's wharf. 

Seattle, Wash.; $9.15 Comox Steam Coal, f. a. s. ex lighters. 

San Francisco, Cal.; $13.05 Utah and/or British Columbia, f. o. b. ex lighters, 
trimming extra. 

San Pedro, Cal.; $8.50 Utah Black; $9.65 R/M; f. o. b. alongside supplier's wharf. 

CANADIAN PORTS. 

Union Bay, Vancouver; $7.65 Comox Steam Coal; f. o. b. under chutes al 
coal piers, trimming extra. 

St. John, N. B.; $10.50 t. i. b. ex lighters. 
North Sydney, N. S.; $7.25 t. i. b. at piers. 
Halifax, N. S.; $10.50 t. i. b. ex lighters. 

Thunderstorms on the Isthmus. 

Thunderstorms, like cyclones and earthquakes, being violent mani- 
festations of the powers of nature, make dramatic impressions on hu- 
man consciousness and are consequently often described with a ten- 
dency to exaggeration of their phenomena. Much has been said of 
the terrific thunderstorms of the Isthmus, but the following paper on 
"Panama Thunderstorms," prepared in the office of the Chief Hydrog- 
rapher of The Panama Canal, is believed to be the first adequate re- 
port to be made on Panama thunderstorms based on authentic records: 

l hunderstorms arc of frequent occurrence in most tropical and equatorial regions 
of heavy rainfall. In Panama the curves of thunderstorm frequency follow fairly 
close the curves of average monthly rainfall, but August is generally the month of 
maximum thunderstorm frequency, while May and November are the months of 
heaviest rainfall. There is a marked decrease in thunderstorms in November and 
December due to a decrease in the number of afternoon convective showers, yet 
November is usually tl e rainiest month of the year. 

The following table si ows the yearly average number of thunderstorm days at 
stations in the Canal Zone, compared with selected stations in the United States: 



138 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Station. 


Location. 


Approximate 
elevation. 


Years of 
record. 


Thunderstorm 

days each 

year. 


Colon 




Feet. 

10 
400 
100 
67 
7,013 
595 
314 
155 


11 
7 

13 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 


106 


Culebra 




137 


Balboa Heights 




119 




Gulf Coast 


94 


Santa Fe, New Mexico 




73 


Chicago, Illinois 




40 


New York City 




28 


San Francisco 


Pacific Coast 


1 



6 Thunderstorms in Panama are most numerous in the interior near the Continental 
ivide and fewest along the Atlantic Coast. 

HOURLY DISTRIBUTION OF THUNDERSTORMS. 

Sufficient data are not available to show accurately the curves of hourly distribution 
of thunderstorms in Panama, but in a general way from 75 per cent to 80 per cent of 
all thunderstorms occurduring the daytime on the Pacific Coast and over the interior, 
while along the Atlantic Coast nearly half of the thunderstorms occur during the night 
or early morning. The reason for this difference in thunderstorm distribution is to 
be found in the character of prevailing rainstorms. On the Pacific Coast and over 
the interior most of the rains are afternoon local showers of convective origin, usually 
accompanied by thunder and lightning, while along the Atlantic Coast much of the 
rainfall comes in the form of general storms of wider extent, and many of these occur 
during the night or early morning. 

Attendant phenomona normally include precipitation, wind squalls, and occasion- 
ally hail.* 

^Precipitation. — Practically all Panama thunderstorms are accompanied by rainfall, many o F the 
fains being at an excessive rate. The average number of excessive rains per year is about 60 on the 
Atlantic Coast and about 30 on the Pacific Coast. Most of these excessive rains accompany thunder- 
storms. (Excessive rains are classified in accordance with the U. S. Weather Bureau Scale of Excessive 
Precipitation.) 

I Wind squalls. — Thunderstorms in the Canal Zone frequently are accompanied by wind squalls. 
These seem to have a gyratory motion at times, but the maximum wind usually is a straight blow. 
The wind may blow from any direction. Maximum wind velocities range from 25 up to 45 or 50 miles 
tn hour. These wind squalls seldom are of sufficient violence to do much damage on land, and they 
never are of long enough duration to kick up a heavy sea at either Canal entrance. 

Thunderstorms and wind squalls usually travel across the Isthmus from the Atlantic Coast toward 
the Pacific, approximately in the direction of the gem ral air circulation, which is from north to south 
or from northeast to southwest. Occasional thunderstorms have been observed to travel in the 
opposite direction from the south or southeast toward I he north or northwest. Two of the most 
riolent wind storms of record in Panama moved across the Isthmus from the southeast. One occurred 
»n July 10, 1909, with a maximum wind velocity of 59 miles an hour at Ancon and the other occurred 
during the night of June 16-17, 1919, the maximum velocity recorded being 50 miles an hour at 
Gatun, C. Z. 

Hail. — Hail has been observed in the Canal Zone or vicinity on three occasions during the past 12 
pears, accompanying thunder or rain storms. Hail fell at Cucaracha (near Culebra) in 1908, the exact 
date being unknown, and again at Alhajuela on the afternoon of May 28, 1910. A third hail storm 
occurred on Naos Island on June 15, 1912, during a heavy rain storm. The hail stones that fell during 
these storms were small and melted quickly, and in no case was the fall excessive. This phenomenon 
Is unusual in a low-lying tropical ccuntry, but severe hailstorms are experienced frequently at high 
iltitudes in mountainous regions within the tropics. 

SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. 

Although thunderstorms are very numerous in Panama, averaging from 100 to 
140 per year, very few of these storms are particularly severe. -Perhaps not more than 
two or three extremely severe thunderstorms will occur during the course of a year. 
Contrary to the popular belief that thunderstorms in equatorial regions are some- 
thing terrific, it is the writer's observation that thunderstorms in the central ar.d 
upper Mississippi valley sections of the United States, while not nearly so numerous 
as thunderstorms in Panama, are frequently more severe and destructive. 

LIGHTNING DAMAGE. 

Lightning accompanying thunderstorms has caused little damage or loss of life 
in the Canal Zone and vicinity during recent years. The following table shows the 
number of deaths by lightning since 19C6, taken from the Health Department vital 
statistics, and from newspaper reports: 



Year. 



1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 



Deaths 

from 

lightning. 





*2 

1 



3 







Year. 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Deaths 
from 
lightning. 
1 




1 



Total (13 years). 



8 



•Deaths from dynamite; explosion set off by lightning. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 139 

The average population of the Canal Zone (including Panama City and Colon) during this period was 
about 120,000. 

1 here are few records of serious property damage from lightning in the Canal Zone. 

An oil tank at Mount Hope belonging to the Union Oil Company was struck by lightning on May 20, 
1908. and 11,000 barrels of oil were burned. 

1 lie radio towers at Colon were struck by lightning three times on the night of October 14, 1914, 
and badly damaged. 

The instrument tower at Balboa Heights was struck on October 19, 1914. 

The radio towers are struck by lightning frequently during electrical storms, but when properly 
grounded they ordinarily suffer little or no damage. 

Canal lighthouses and range lights have been struck by lightning a number of times. Lighthouse 
tower No. 5 at the 1'aciric entrance was struck twice in June, 1918, and badly damaged; and a tall 
lighthouse tower at Gatun was struck and damaged in August, 1918. 

An observation balloon at the Coco Solo Naval air station was burned by lightning during an electric 
Storm on August 5, 1919. The mess hall located close by was struck at practically the same time and 
slightly damaged. It was stated in the report of the Naval Committee that investigated the damage, 
"That the electric current seemed to pass from the bottom of the building upward and out through 
the roof." A similar phenomenon was reported a few months earlier on Bona Island in the Gulf of 
Panama where the reinforced concrete lighthouse tower was struck by lightning, the charge 
seeming to pass from the base of the tower upward and out into space. 

The relatively slight damage from lightning suffered in the Canal Zone and vicinity 
may be partly explained as follows: 

(1) A large percentage of the lightning bolts probably never reach the earth but 
merely pass from one cloud to another. 

(2) In the Canal Zone and vicinity there are a large number of hills with round, 
conical tops, ranging in elevation from a few hundred feet up to 1,000 feet or more. 
These hilltops probably serve as lightning rods or conductors, and, being for the most 
part uninhabited, lightning bolts that strike them do no damage. 

(3) It is probable, also, that the humid atmospheric conditions and frequent rain- 
storms that prevail on the Isthmus and the moist condition of the soil facilitate the 
ready interchange of electrical currents between the atmosphere and the earth, thus 
tending to prevent the accumulation of powerful electric stresses that would finally 
find relief in severe thunderstorms. This is thought to be one of the principal causes 
of the relatively slight damage suffered in the Canal Zone from electric storms. 

COMPARISONS. 

It is interesting to compare thunderstorm conditions in Panama with conditions 
in the United States. There are two areas of maximum thunderstorm frequency in 
the United States. The principal one extends over the Gulf States with center near 
Tampa, Florida, where the average annual number of thunderstorms is about 94. 
Another thunderstorm region centers over New Mexico, where the average annual 
number of thunderstorms is about 73. The Pacific Coast of the United States is the 
most free from electric storms. The average number of thunderstorms at San 
Francisco is less than one per year. 

Thunderstorms over the central and upper Mississippi Valley States average about 
40 per year. A large percentage of these accompany general cyclonic storms and they 
may occur either during the daytime or at night. The greatest damage from lightning 
occurs in the region from the central Mississippi valley eastward to the Atlantic 
Coast. 

It is variously estimated that from 500 to 1,000 buildings are struck by lightning 
and burned in the United States each year, and that several hundred people are killed 
by the lightning annually, and many more injured. 

It would seem that although thunderstorms are more numerous in Panama than 
anywhere in the United States, the total loss of life and property damage from electric 
storms is relatively less in Panama than in many sections of the United States. 

The data on thunderstorms in the United Status presented herein were abstracted 
from papers on Thunderstorms, by VYm. A. Alexander, of the U. S. Weather Bureau, 
and Robert DeC. Ward, published in the Proceedings of the Second Pan-American 
Scientific Congress, Vol. II. 



Commercial Telephones. 

Owing to the fact that there are no surplus telephone instruments on 
the Isthmus, it will be impossible for the Electrical Division to fill 
the numerous requests on file for private telephone installations, until 
the arrival of new instruments from the States. 

It is impossible to state when the telephone instruments now on 
order will arrive, on account of the uncertainty of labor and shipping 
conditions. When they arrive, notice will be published. 

\Y. L. Hersh, Electrical Engineer. 



1 40 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

New Spur Track at La Pita. 

A spur track heading north has been built on the east side of the 
main line of the Panama Railroad at La Pita to be used for dumping 
manure for the Supply Department gardens. The total length of the 
track is 323 feet and the available length from derail to end, 151 feet. 



November Weather Probabilities. 



The following weather conditions may be e t ected at the Canal 
entrances during the month of November, 1919. Predictions are 
based on November records of 12 and 13 years at Colon and Balboa 
Heights, respectively: 

Winds — Light aid variable winds with an average hourly velocity of from 6 to 12 
miles an hour will prevail throughout the month at the Atlantic entrance, the 
higher average wind velocities occurring during the middle of the day. Southeast 
and west winds will predominate. Maximum velocities of from 30 to 40 miles an 
hour are possible during local rain or thunder squalls. 

At the Pacific entrance and over the interior light northwest winds will prevail, 
with a considerable percentage of variable wind during the daytime. The average 
hourly velocity will range from 5 miles during the early morning to 8 miles during 
the middle of the day, although maximum velocities of from 25 to 30 miles an 
hour are likely to occur during rain or thunder squalls. 

Rain — The average November rainfall at Colon is 21.34 inches, and at the Pacific 
entrance 10.87 inches; these averages are based on 48 years' record at Colon and 
22 years' record at Balboa Heights. About 26 days with rain may be expected at 
the Atlantic entrance, and 23 days at the Pacific, while the average number of days 
with heavy rain (1 inch or more) is about 8 at the Atlantic entrance, and 3 on the 
Pacific side. The greater part of the rainfall (about 70 per cent) occurs durirg 
the daytime at the Pacific entrance and over the interior, while along the Atlantic 
Coast nearly half of the November rainfall occurs during the nighttime. 

Fogs — A few fogs may be expected on the Pacific Coast, but nore are likely to 
occur on the Atlantic side. The average number of nights with light or dense fog 
oyer the Caillard Cut section of the Canal is 14. These fogs should rot prove a 
hindrance to navigation in the daytime, as practically all fogs that occur may be 
expected to lift or be dissipated before 8.30 a. m. 

Temperatures — The average shade air temperature will be approximately 79° 
Fahrenheit over both coasts. Temperatures are more equable on the Atlantic 
Coast than on the Pacific. The temperature is not likely to rise above 90° F. or 
fall lower than 70° F. on the Atlantic Coast, while at the Pacific entrance the max- 
imum temperature may be as high as 94° F. and the minimum as low as 67° F. 
The mean daily range of temperature is approximately 8° F. on the Atlantic Coast, 
and 14° F. on the Pacific. 

Barometric pressure — -The average sea level atmospheric pressure will be about 
29.85 inches. Local barometric readings are of little value in forecasting weather 
conditions, as fluctuations in air pressure on the Isthmus are very slight, except 
for the well-marked diurnal changes. The maximum pressure during the month 
may not be expected to exceed 29.98 inches, or the minimum pressure to be less 
than 29.68 inches. 

Relative humidity — The relative humidity of the atmosphere will average about 
88 per cent over both coasts. The range is greater on the Pacific Coast, where the 
nighttime average humidity is about 95 per cent and the average daily humidity 
is about 75 percent, while on the Atlantic Coast the average nighttime humidity 
is about 92 per cent, and the average daily minimum humidity is about 75 per cent. 

Storms — The so-called "northers" may extend as far south as the Atlantic en- 
trance of the Canal during the month of November. These storms are characterized 
by brisk north to northwest winds, ranging in velocity up to 30 or more miles an 
hour, and are usually accompanied by a heavy swell. Local wind, thunder, and 
rain squalls, of more or less limited extent, may be expected quite frequently during 
the month. Generally cloudy weather will continue over both coasts, and smooth 
to moderate seas may be expected at the Pacific entrance. Storms of the hur- 
ricane type may occur during the month over the Caribbean Sea and West Indian 
Island?. 

Tides — Tidal fluctuations need not be considered in navigating the Atlantic 
entrance to the Canal, as the extreme tidal range is but about two feet. The tidal 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



141 



range at the Pacific entrance averages about 13 feet, while the maximum range may 
reach 20 feet during spring tides. 

Panama (Balboa) tide predictions for the month are given below: 



Day of- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Heiehi of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Height of 
an i Low Water 


High 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 




S 


I 


3:05 8:40 
4.6 12.5 


3:31 9:24 
4.3 12. £ 


Tu 


II 


5:48 12:07 
17 5 -1.1 


6:22 
17.1 




F 


21 


2:38 
14.4 


9:06 
2.2 


3:07 
14.0 


9.21 
3.0 


S 


2 


4:08 9:43 
4.8 12.2 


4:34 10:2S 
4.5 12.S 


w 


12 


0:32 6:39 
0.3 16.9 


12:57 
-0.3 


7:1? 
16.5 


S 


22 


3:16 
14 


9:46 
1.7 


3:46 
14.3 


10.00 
2.7 


M 


3 


5:13 10:59 
4.5 12 3 


5:39 11 :3i 
4.2 13.4 


Th 


'3 


1:24 7:31 
11 10 


1:43 
0.7 


8:05 
15.8 


S 


23 


3:53 
14.8 


10 :23 
1 4 


4:25 
14.5 


10:37 
2.5 


Tu 


4 


6:18 12:11 
3.8 13.0 


6:42 
3 .6 


F 


14 


2:21 8:25 
2.1 15.0 


2:45 
1.8 


9:01 
15.0 


M 


-4 


4:31 

14.8 


10 :58 
1.3 


5:03 
14.6 


11.13 
2.5 


W 


5 


0:38 7:18 
14.4 2.7 


1:12 7:4? 
14.0 2.7 


S 


15 


3:24 9:25 
2.9 14.0 


3:47 
2.8 


10:02 
14.2 


Tu 


25 


5:07 
14.8 


11:34 
1.4 


5:41 
14.5 


11.49 
2.6 


Th 


6 


1:32 8:12 
15.4 1.5 


2:05 8:3< 
15.1 1.6 


s 


16 


4:30 10:32 
3.5 13.2 


4:51 
3.5 


11:07 
13. £ 


W 


26 


5:43 
14.6 


12:10 
1.7 


6:17 
14.4 




F 


7 


2:24 9:02 
16.4 0.2 


2:53 S:Z>. 
Ib.O 0.1 


M 


17 


5 :36 1 1 :42 
3.7 12.9 


5:54 
3.9 




Th 


27 


0:26 
2.9 


6:20 
11.2 


12:47 
2.1 


6:52 
14.3 


S 


8 


3:14 9:50 
17.2 -0 7 


3:47 10:1D 
16.8 -0.1 


Tu 


18 


0:12 6:3,8 12:46 
13.7 3.6 13.0 


6:55 

3.9 


F 


28 


1:06 
3.2 


6 :57 
13.9 


1:25 
2.6 


7:29 
14.1 


s 


9 


4:04 10:35 
17.7 -1.3 


4:38 10:57 
17.2 0.4 


W 


19 


1 :08 7 :35 
13.9 3.2 


1:40 
13.3 


r:50 

3.7 


S 


29 


1:49 
3.5 


7:34 
13.6 


2:08 
3.0 


8:08 
13.9 


M 


IO 


4:55 11:21 
17 9 -15 


5:30 11:43 
17.3 -0.3 


Th 


20 


1:55 8:23 
14.2 2 7 


2:28 
13.6 


8:3f 
3.4 


s 


30 


2:38 
3.7 


8:19 
13.2 


2:58 
3.4 


8:55 
13.8 



The tides are placed in the order of their occurrence; the times of hip.h and low tides are shown on 
the upper lines. The figures in boldface! type are hours and elevations between noon and midmght; 
ante meridian figures are given in the ord.nary lightfaced type. The time is Cosmopolitan Standard 
for the meridian 75° W. 

The el-.vntions of the water are shown on the second line for each day; a comparison of consecutive 
heights will indicate whether it is high or low water. Heights are reckoned from mean low water 
springs, which is 8 3 below mean sea level and is the datum ot soundings on the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey cnarts tor this region. The depth of water may accordingly be estimated by adding the tabu- 
lar height of the tide to the soundings, unless a minus (-) sign is before the height, in which case it 
is to be subtracted. The annual inequality or variation in the mean sea level is included in the 
predictions. 



Comparative Wind Records, Cape Mala, Sosa Hill, and Balboa Heights, 
August and September, 1919. 

The following figures show comparative Mind records at Cape Mala, at the entrance 
to the Gulf of Panama, and at Sosa Hill and Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, in August 
and September, 1919: 







Cape Mala. 


Sosa Hill. 


Balboa 
Heights. 




Aug. 


Sept. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Average hourly velocity 


. miles.. 


9.6 
45. 

NW 
38 
21 

SE 


9 2 

61. 

SW 

39 

26 

NE 


11 

67 
NW 
48 
5 
E 


8.4 
48. 

NW 

29 

8 
S 


6.6 


5.7 




NW 

32 

5 

SW 


NW 


Maxinnin velocity recorded 


miles . 


22 
13 


Direction from which blowing 


S 



Note — Approximate elevations of anemometer? are as follows: Cane Mala. 110 feet above ground, 150 feet above 
meanscalevel; Sosa Hill, 35 leet above ground, 405feet above mcansealevel; Balboa Heights, 97 feet above ground, 231 
feet above mean sealevel. 



Local Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations for The Panama Canal Service will be held at Balboa 
Heights, C. Z., on the dates set opposite the titles thereof: 

Clerk, December 21, 1919. 

Postal clerk, Decembei II. 1919. 

Stenographer and typist. December 14. into. 

The usual entrant Clerk, $106 a month; postal clerk. S100 to $125 a month: stenogra- 

pher and typist, $137 for males and $116 for females. 

Full information in regard to tin' scopi and the character of the examinations is contained in pam- 
phlet, form 1424, "Information for Applicants for Stenographer and Typewriter Examination", a 
copy of which may be obtained from the Secretary, Board of Civil Service Examiners, Adminis- 
tration Building, Balboa Z. A iplicants for the clerk examination must take at least 
one optional subject in addition to the regular basis subjects. The optional subjects are: First, 



142 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

typewriting; second, bookkeeping; third, general business training and experience; fourth, time- 
keeping training and experience. If the third optional is taken, three letters of recommendation 
from former employers should accompany the application. 

Applicants for the examination for postal cierk must show that they have had at least one year's 
experience as clerk in the United States or Canal Zone post offices or as postmaster or as Navy mail 
clerk, and they are familiar with the receipt, distribution, and dispatch of mail matter, the issuance 
of money orders, registration of mail and the preparation of various reports required of postmasters. 

Application form No. 1312 must be filled out, including the medical certificate but excluding the 
county officer's certificate, and should be filed promptly with tne Board of Civil Examiners at Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. 

Applicants must have reached their twentieth but not their forty-fifth birthday on the date of the 
examination, must be citizens of the United States, physically sound and in good health. 

Applicants must submit to the examiner on the day of the examination their photographs taken 
within two years, securely pasted in the place provided on the admission cards sent them after their 
applications are filed. 

Applicants for the clerk examination in answer to question No. 1 and on the outside 'Of the form 
should state the optional subject taken in addition to the name of the examination required. 

In answer to question No. 4, applicant must show residence in some Stale or territory of the United 
Stales from the time of taking up residence therein to December, 1919, on account of temporary em- 
ployment on the Canal Zone and their retention of legal residence in the United States. The same 
must be shown as to the county. 

This examination is scheduled on the dates shown especially to provide for the examination of 
soldiers, sailors, marines, field clerks, and enlisted Army and Navy nurses who were unable to com- 
pete after April 6, 191 7, and who are allowed 60 days from August i , 1919, to do so, if they have been 
discharged prior to that date. Those discharged later will be allowed 60 days after discharge to 
compete; but, owing to our distance from the United States and the delay in receiving questions, all 
such persons should compete if possible on the date above mentioned. 

These examinations will also be open to any other applicants desiring to be examined for the Panama 
Canal Service. 

In addition to the examinations listed above, examinations for Stenographer, Typist and Sten- 
ographer-Typist in the Departmental Service in Washington, or elsewhere, will be held at Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. on December 7, 1919. These examinations are substantially the same as those for 
like positions with the Panama Canal Service, except that the minimum age limit is lower, namely 
18 years. The entrance salary for typist is usually $1,100 and that for stenographer $1,200, in the 
United States, but for employment in civilian positions with the U. S. Army on the Isthmus, the 
same salaries may be paid as in the Panama Canal Service. 



Motor Vehicles and Bicycles Licensed in the Canal Zone. 

for the calendar year of 1919 the following licenses have been 
issued for motor vehicles, which expire December 31, with the excep- 
tion of the official licenses, which continue in force as long as the 
license tag is in good condition and the vehicle to which it is assigned 
is running: 

Personal licenses for private cars, 491; commercial licenses for cars 
carrying persons for hire, omnibuses, and trucks, 454; official licenses 
for automobiles and trucks of The Panama Canal, United States 
Army and Navy, and the Panama Government, 463; personal motor- 
cycle licenses, 136; official motorcycle licenses, 142. 

The total number of automobile licenses is 1,408, and the total of 
motorcycles, 278. As machines owned in Panama are licensed recip- 
rocally in Panama, the foregoing figures include vehicles of both Pan- 
ama and Colon and the Canal Zone. 

The Canal Zone annual license fees are as follows: 

For each passenger automobile for personal use only, $5 ; for each 
automobile of 29 horsepower or less, used for carrying passengers for 
hire, $20; for each automobile of more than 29 horsepower, used for 
carrying passengers for hire, $30; tor each truck or omnibus of one- 
ton capacity or less, $20; for each truck or omnibus of a capacity cf 
more than one ton but less than three tons, $30; for each truck or om- 
nibus of a capacity of three tons or more, $40 ; for each motorcycle, $2. 

Residents of the Canal Zone must secure a Canal Zone license first 
and are then entitled to the following reciprocal rates per year from 
the municipalities of Panama and Colon: 

For each passenger automobile for personal use only, $1; for, each 
automobile used for carrying passengers for hire, $12.50 ; for each truck 
or omnibus, $15; for each motorcycle, $1. 

The above reciprocal rates are also allowed residents of Panama, who 
are required to license their vehicles in Panama or Colon first, and 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 143 

may then receive a reciprocal Canal Zone license upon presentation 
of their Panama or Colon license receipt. 

Bicycles are licensed for the fiscal year at $1 per year. There are 
139 official bicycles licensed in the Canal Zone. Since July 1, 1919, 
there have been issued 565 licenses for private bicycles. 

As the present supply of 1919 automobile license tags for private 
cars, with blue background and white raised letters and numbers, No. 
001 to 500, will be exhausted in a few days, it will be necessary to issue 
tags similar to those used on private cars in 1918, during the remainder 
of this calendar year. These tags have a white ground and black 
raised letters and will begin with No. 451 and run to No. 500. 



Subscribers to Victory Liberty Loan. 

Subscribers to the Victory Liberty Loan, who have changed their 
address since submitting their applications last April and May, should 
notify Mr. T. L. Clear, Treasurer, Liberty Loan Committee, Balboa 
Heights, in writing, in order that delivery of their Victory notes may 
be made without unnecessary delay. 



Shortage of Electric Lamps. 

The stock of 25, 40, 60 and 100-watt Mazda B lamps has been en- 
tirely exhausted. These are the sizes used in house lighting and most 
all other lighting, and it is recommended that employees conserve 
their lamps as much as possible until the new supply has arrived. 

Part of the year's supply of lamps has been passed for shipment, but 
the unsettled labor and shipping conditions in the States makes it 
impossible to state when these lamps will be received. 






Balboa Night School. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 21, 1919. 

The Balboa Night School will begin the 1919-20 session Tuesday, 
November 4, at 7 p. m. Classes will be offered in shorthand and type- 
writing, beginning and advanced Spanish, English grammar or litera- 
ture, mechanical drawing, and commercial or shop mathematics. 

Each class will be two hours in length, from 7 to 9 p. m., meeting 
twice each week. Beginning Spanish and English w'ill be scheduled for 
Mondays and Thursdays; shorthand and typewriting as one class, 
advanced Spanish, and mechanical drawing will be scheduled for Tues- 
days and Fridays. In case of sufficient demand a class in bookkeeping 
may be offered. 

Four dollars per month per course is charged. 

For further information telephone or write the High School Prin- 
cipal, Balboa, C. Z. 

A. R. Lang, 
Superintendoit of Schools. 



Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal. , 

The postal address is, "The Pana.aa Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," or ""The Panama 
Canal, Washington. D. C" 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama;" in the 
United States. "Pancanal, Washington." 

Mail for ships passing through the Canal or touching at either of the terminal ports should be 
addressed to "Cristobal, Canal Zone." 



144 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Official Circulars. 

Appointment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 15, 1919. 
Circular Xo. 661-80: 

The appointment of Dr. Dalferes P. Curry as 
Assistant Chief Health Officer, effective October 
1, 1919, is hereby announced. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 16, lvl9. 
Circular No. 217: 

Effective October 13, 1919, Lieut. Com. J. G. 
Fels, I . S. X. R. F., is designated an accountable 
official of The Panama Canal, vice Capt. H. L. 
Eden, and as such will account for all nonexpend- 
able property in use by the Captain of the Port, 
Cristobal. 

H. A. A. Smith. 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 
Approved : 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Instructions Relative to the Handling of 
Two Labor Trains from Paraiso every 
Afternoon Daily except Sundays and 
Holidays. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 28, 1919. 
Circular Xo. 1414: 

Eirst labor train will leave Paraiso at 3.30 
p. m., making stops with engine in so far as pos- 
sible at the following track spans and other points: 

Pedro Miguel 40-7 

Mirafloies 42-10 

Miraflores 42-12 

Miraflores 43- ' 

Corozal 44-4 

Balboa Heights, 2 car lengths south of switch 

leading to motor car house. 
Bisnop's Hollow, at switch leading to Ancon corn- 
mi ssn.rv. 
livoli Spur, at switch south of passenger shed. 
Panama, first stop, north end of No. 8's train; 
L second stop, about opposite first class passenger 
i gate. 

On arrival at Panama after making the two 
stops and putting labor train away return with 
light engine to Paraiso. picking up the four labor 
cars and coach left there, back up to opposite 
Paraiso station convenient for employees to board 
cars, leaving Paraiso at 4.15 p. m., or as soon 
thereafter as ready, stopping at: 

Pedro Miguel. 

Red Tank. 

Miraflores station. 

Corozal commissary. 

Balboa Heights. 

Tivoli Spur. 

Panama, north end of No. 8's train. 

Crews handling these labor trains will leave 
Balboa Heights station first trip north at 3.05 
p. m., with one coach for the accommodation of 
school children living at Corozal. Pedro Miguel, 
and Paraiso. Coach to be handled only on school 
days. This coach and four labor cars will be left 
at Paraiso. Coach to be used by gold employees 
on second trip south. 

On Saturdays and other days that labor train 
runs when there is no school, engine will go light 
to Para ; sr>. leaving Diablo at 3.15 p. m., and on 
arrival at Panama on first trip after making second 
stop at north end of Xo. 8 s train, the last gold 



employees' car will be uncoupled from train and 
taken back to Paraiso for the accommodation of 
gold emplo\ ees who use coach on school days. 

Circular Xo. 1 410, issued under date of October 
25. and all other instructions relative to above 
labor trains, are hereby canceled. 

W. J. BlSSELL, 

Acting Master of Transportation. 
Approved : 
S. W. IIeald, 
Superintendent. 



Passenger Train Service on November 3. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 24, 1919. 
Circular Xo. 1405: 

To a!': oncerned — On account of Monday, No- 
r 3, being a legal holiday, the Panama 
Railroad will operate regular Sunday schedule 
on the main line that date. 

Xo change will be made in the Las Cascadaa 
Branch nor Fort Randolph Branca schedules. 
W. J. Bissell, 
Acting Master of Transportation. 
Approved: 

S. W. Heald, 
Superintendent. 



Noon Hours of Work Train Crews. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. October 17, 1919. 
Circular Xo. 1398: 

Dispatchers, conductors, and engineers, P.R.R. — 
In the future, chain gang crews handling work 
trains through the midday period will take 
one hour for noon meal unless otherwise ordered 
by the department for which crew is working. 
If it is desired that crew work through noon hour 
the conductor will so notify the dispatcher at the 
first opportunity. 

W. J. Bissell, 
Acting Master of Transportation. 



Misdirected Letters. 

Balboa Heights. C Z., October 25, 1919. 
The following insafficiently addressed mail has 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may he obtained upon request of the addres- 
see. Request maj be made bv telephone, calling 
Xo. 182. Balboa. 

Anulin, David Holgeson, Edw. 

B igli j , < I irence Icaza, Octavio A. de* 

Beebe, Cornelius Kline, Mr. 

Bonneville. E. H. Rrusi, Mrs. Robert 

Bowman, Robert Paul Lamb, Thomas K.t 
Brown, H. Lowsky, Alexander 

Cara, Fred* McAniff, Mrs. Johanna 

Clark, Mrs. Chas. A. Maloone, Mrs. Meselita 
Cook. James Gordon Mangnall. John X. 
Damon, Quincy A.* Mueller. Ernst 
Dodge, Mrs. M. H. Xoone, Patrick B. 
Doty, Charies Reymonds, Thomas 

Edwards, Marguerite R.Ruiz, Anastacio X. 
Fauchier, Ernest Salgado, Dr. Rafael M.* 

Follette, J. P. TreaUe. J. C* 

Forbes, Egbert* Trover, S. E. 

Geania, Mrs. Sarah Veysset, Jeanne 
Grosch, Nicholas, Jr.* Ward, Phillip Raymond 
Haggerty, los. B. Wiggins, James 

Harris, C. W. Williams. Calvert 

Haus, Mrs. II. 



* Paper, t Special Delivery. 



Additions to Commissary Scock. 

Stoves, Florence, 2-burner, ea SI 4. 85 

Trays, round, enameled, ea 54 

Trunks, wardrobe, ea 43.20 

Trunks, wardrobe, ea 39.30 

Trunks, wardrobe, ea 31 .45 

Aprons, gingham, May time model, ea.. .. 1 .65 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 145 

Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Chemise, envelope, embroidered Philip- Hose, ladies' silk, medium gray, pr $2.50 

1 pine, ea $2.20 Hose, ladies' silk, silver eray, pr 2.50 

Corsets, white, Bon Ton, ea 3.45 Hose , adieg . sllk light gray, pr 2.50 

vSZSE- ' 3ar Hcse - ,adies ' silk - na ™ * 2 so 

Ii4%« c ^ 36 ''- ard % feSSSt::,:::::: 1:8 



Crepe, Raty. yd *8 



Hose, ladies' siIk, pink, pr 2.50 



I.inen, white dress. 36", yd 9S : , ■• /;. ;• >' ;; »"■ f ™ 

\',, i,. Vn'ni iv, t i nrintpri ?fi" vH ?o pse, iaaies silk, navy, pr 1.95 

• ■!:.: Pi;;..:: Set 26"! yd!::::: [29 Nightgowns, embroidered, PWippine.ea.. 2.20 

Vole Primavera orinted 26" vd 29 Nightgowns, embroidered, Philippine, ea. . 3.15 

Voile: Dcauville printed: 3P/40", yd 49 Pens, fountain. Waterman s regular type. 

SffiSSfl^'SSlS -A. fs & <P- -im V^erma n 's safety type.'ea | 

G^Sr^r oughUted ' 35/36 '' yd - -3 ^ f0 ^S , fc2SSS.!.r?^!'~ 2 :°? 

Handkerchiefs. H. S. linen, ea 4.) £° |h. liquid Cutex, hot 27 

Handkerchiefs, cotton, ea 28 l" ', ' r , ' . II 

handkerchiefs, linen, embroidered, ea 90 Ronee - ( utex - lur 27 

Handkerchiefs, linei . fancy, ea 45 Stationery: 

Handkerchiefs, linen, fancy, ea 43 Books, memo, black leather, quad, ruled 

Hose, ladies' silk , Cordovan, pr 2.50 without printing, ea 30 

Hose, ladies' silk, African brown, pr 2.50 Suiting, linen, bleached, 45", yard 82 

Hose, ladies' s ; lk, black, pr 2 .50 Ties, knit, 4-in-hand, ea 1 .85 

Hose, ladies' s!1k, brown, pr 2.50 Ties, knit, 4-in-hand, ea 1 .85 

Hose, ladies' silK, bronze, pr 2.50 Ties, knit, 4-in-hand, ea 1 . 40 

Hose, ladies' silk, Chasseur blue, pr 2.50 Ties. knit. 4-in-hand, assorted, ea 2.85 

Hose, ladies' sil'c. Champagne, pr 2.50 Ties, knit. 4-in-hand, assorted, ea 2.50 

Hose, ladies' silk, green, pr 2.50 Towels, H. S. union, buck, 20 x 38, ea 45 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Commissary Closing Notice. 

The groceries and cold storage sections and cigar counters of all commissaries 
will be open Monday, November 3, 1919, only from 8 to 9 a. m. 

Mineral Water. 

Club =oda is now on sale at all commissaries. It is a carbonated water and is in- 
tended for those who seek a highly charged beverage without sweetening or flavor. 

Variety of Stock Selection. 

ft will be of interest to commissary customers to learn that approximately 4,300 
different items are carried in the retail stores, as follows: Grocery department, 716; 
hardware department. 1,244; boots and shoes department, 329; dry goods de- 
partment, 1,823; and cold storage department, 229. 

Hosiery. 

A shipment of ladies' silk hose in all the latest and most fashionable shades, in- 
cluding cordovan, African brown, bronze, Chasseur blue, champagne, green, medium 
gray, silver gray, light gray, black, pearl, navy, white and pink, has recently been 
received and plated on sale in the commissaries. These are priced at $2.50 per 
pair. Not only are these in demand ir. shades matching evening gowns, but with 
white Oxfords are used for wear with sports clothes. 

Cost of Water Ices Reduced. 

Effective October 21, the retail prices of sherbets, or water ices, manufactured 
by the Commissary Division were reduced to the following: Pineapple, 70 cents 
per gallon, strawberry-, si .1 () per gallon, orange, 70cents per gallon, lemon, 50 cents 
per gallon. The new selling prices are not standard for it has been found that the 
cost of making sherbet varies widely, according to the flavor, and that therefore a 
standard selling price for al! flavors can not be exact. 

Souvenirs. 

Splendid views of an epochal naval event, the passage through the Panama Canal 
of the new Pacific Fleet, United States Navy, in July, 1919, are provided in a 
24-oaee booklet of attractive form, recently stocked by the Commissary Division, 
The cover of the booklet shows, in two colors, the U. S. S. Rhode Island in Gatun 
Lake. The booklet also includes several miscellaneous views taken in the Canal 
Zone. These are designed to give a general idea of the towns and country ad- 
jacent to the Canal. The price of the booklet is 40 cents. 



146 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, 11.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 5, 1919. No. 12. 

CANAL WORK IN SEPTEMBER. 

The following is the report of the Governor to the Secretary of 
War, of Canal work in the month of September, 1919: 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 22, 1919. 
The Honorable, the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of The Panama Canal for 
the month of September, 1919: 

CANAL TRAFFIC. 

The number of ocean-going commercial vessels passing through the Canal for the 
month was 170, exclusive of 13 United States Government vessels, as follows: 
One cruiser, 1 mine depot ship, 4 destroyers, 1 mine-planter, 2 tugs, 3 merchant ships 
with coal for the Navy, and 1 Coast and Geodetic Survey ship. The total number of 
ocean-going vessels was 183, in addition to which 1 launch went from Atlantic to 
Pacific, and 3 from Pacific to Atlantic. 

Classifications of the traffic are shown in the following tabulations. The net 
tonnage of 170 commercial ships aggregated 586,186 tons, Panama Canal measure- 
ment, and was 75 tons more than that of commercial ships passing through the Canal 
in August, when 188 ships of 586,111 tons made the transit. Their registered gross 
tonnage was 765,050 tons, and their registered net tonnage 488,395 tons. The cargo 
carried totaled 638,270 tons of 2,240 pounds, and was 77,454 tons less than that 
handled in August. Of that in September, 1919, 7,921 tons were carried as deck load. 
Ships of 10 different nationalities were included in the month's traffic. 

The United States coastwise trade was made up of 17 vessels, aggregating 61,156 
tons, Panama Canal measurement, and carrying 80,948 tons of cargo. From Atlantic 
to Pacific, 2 ships with a total net tonnage of 9,065 tons, Panama Canal measure- 
ment, made the transit, carrying 15,469 tons of cargo. From the Pacific to the 
Atlantic there were 15 vessels of 52,091 tons, carrying 65,479 tons of cargo. 

The United States Shipping Board operated 1 of the westbound siiips in the coast- 
wise trade, with a net tonnage of 1,742 tons, Panama Canal measurement, carrying 
4,000 tons of cargo, and 13 of the 15 vessels eastbound. The net tonnage of the 13 
ships from Pacific to Atlantic aggregated 44,627 tons, and their cargo amounted to 
65,479 tons. 

PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES. 

The bulk shipments from Atlantic to Pacific were: Crude oil, 61,486 tons, of which 
9,261 tons were from Tampico lo Antofagasta, 9,500 tons from Puerto Lobos to 
San Francisco, 9,725 tons from Tampico to Pisagua, 10,500 tons from Puerto Lobos 
to Tocopilla, 9,400 tons from Tampico to San Pedro, 3,500 tons from Tampico to 
Chanaral, and 9,600 tons from Tampico to Tocopilla; petroleum, 32,115 tons, of 
which 8,150 tons were from New York to Honolulu, 11,469 tons from Beaumont to 
San Francisco, and 12,496 tons from Tuxpan to Pisagua; kerosene, 22,571 tons, of 
which 13,456 tons were from New Orleans to .Shanghai, and 9,115 tons from New 
Orleans to Honolulu; coal, 9,248 tons, of which 6,907 tons were from Newport News 
to Lyttleton, and 2,341 tons from Norfolk to Papudo; scrap iron, 935 tons from Cris- 
tobal to San Francisco; mixed cargoes aggregated 31,501 tons, of which 4,613 tons 
were from London to Valparaiso, 9,200 tons from New York to Honolulu, 4,116 tons 
from New YorktoCaliao, 6,555 tons from .V w York to Manila, 3,259 tons from Balti- 
more to Cuayacan, and 3,758 tons from Baltimore to Carrizal; 37 cargoes described 
as "general," amounted to 123,658 tons. 

From the Pacific to the Atlantic the principal commodities were lumber, of which 
24 whole cargoes, aggregating 45,64(1 tons passed through the Canal, 1 7 ships carrying 
32,185 tons for Great Britain, 5 ships 9,189 tons to Atlantic ports of the United States, 
1 ship 1,326 tons to Nipe, Cuba, all from the west coast of North America; and 1 



148 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



ship carrying 940 tons of dye wood and cedar to Cristobal, from Puntarenas, Costa 
Rica; 4 cargoes of barley from San Francisco, 10,375 tons bound for England, and 
2,889 tons for Copenhagen; flour, 6 whole cargoes, 46,334 tons, from Portland and 
San Francisco, 24,943 tons to Norfolk and Newport News, 14,248 tons to Gibraltar, 
and 7,143 tons to New York; nitrates, from Iquique and Pisagua for the United States, 
3 whole cargoes, aggregating 13,099 tons; wheat, 2 whole cargoes from Portland, 
7,600 tons to Newport News and 6,422 tors to Gibraltar; sugar, 8,975 tons in 2 
shipments, 7,879 tons from Honolulu to Philadelphia and 1,096 tons from Eten to 
Cristobal; and 1 whole cargo each of canned fruit, 8,600 tons, from San Fiancisco 
to Liverpool; dried fruit, 1,270 tons from San Francisco to Sweden; 1,445 tons of 
cottonseed, from Supe, Peru, to Bristol; and manganese ore, 8S0 tons, from La Union 
to Baltimore. Twenty-one cargoes were "mixed," containing several commodities, 
aggregating 95,556 tons, and 21 contained the variety designated as "general," 
amounting to 73,827 tons. 

Ships in ballast numbered 7 from the Atlantic, with an aggregate net tonnage of 
28,376 tons, Panama Canal measurement, and 10 from Pacific to Atlantic, of 47,664 
net tons, a total of 17 ships of 76,040 tons. 

LATIN-AMERICAN TRAFFIC. 

Commercial vessels passing through the Canal on their way to the west coast of 
Central and South America during September were, by nationalities, as follows: 



Nationality. 


No. 

ol 

ships. 


Registered 

gross 
tonnage. 


Registered 

net 

tonnage. 


Panama 
Canal net 
tonnage. 


Cargo. 


British 


12 
4 
3 
3 
1 
1 

16 


28,771 
12.894 
12,641 
14,753 
8,134 
6,899 
75,536 


17,651 
7,793 
7,583 
9,196 
5,046 
4,417 

45,644 


21,282 

11,111 
8,272 

11,612 
5,900 
6,653 

56.298 


Tons. 
24,413 
3,608 




2,501 




13,377 






Dutch 


82 




75,618 






Total 


40 


159,628 


97,330 


121,128 


119,599 



Of the 40 vessels, 17 with 12,193 tons of cargo originated at the Atlantic terminus 
of the Canal; 12 with 43,306 tons came from United States ports; 4 with 32,086 
tons of oil from Tampico; 1 with 10,500 tons of crude oil from Puerto Lobos; 1 
with 12,496 tons of petroleum from Tuxpan; 3 with general cargo from. Europe, 
amounting to 9,018 tons; 1 with no cargo from Newcastle and 1 with no cargo from 
Gibraltar. 

Shipments from, the west coast of Central and South America through the 
Canal during September were carried by 31 vessels. Three were bound for Great 
Britain with 10,191 tons of cargo from Chilean and Peruvian ports; 5 were bound for 
Tampico in ballast; 7 for the United States; and 16 completed the voyage at the 
Atlantic terminus of the Canal, discharging 1 bulk cargo of sugar amounting to 1,096 
tons, and 17,870 tons of general cargo. 

By nationalities the ships from the west coast of South and Central America were 
as follows: 



Nationality. 


No. 
of 

ships. 


Registered 
gross 
tonnage. 


Registered 

net 
tonnage. 


Panama 

Canal 

ne1 

tonnage. 


Cargo. 


British 


11 
2 
3 
4 

11 


35,381 
14,009 
9,080 
12,913 
37,749 


21,332 

8,859 

5,505 

7,869 

22,890 


25,127 

10,309 

8.07S 

8,954 

26,362 


Tom. 
14,552 








5,369 
6,786 




20,164 








31 


109,132 


66.455 


78.830 


46,871 



PRINCIPAL TRADE ROUTES. 



The distribution of the traffic through the Canal in September, 1919, according to 
the principal trade routes, was as follows: 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



149 





Ves- 
sels. 


Panama 

Canal 

net 

tonnage. 


Cargo. 


Atlantic to Pacific. 
United States coastwise 


2 

12 

5 

17 

1 

3 

4 

15 

4 

2 

6 

1 


9,065 
39.407 
23,303 
25 725 

3,789 
15,702 
23,350 
74,166 

6,100 
1(1,646 
32,753 

1,713 


Tom. 
15,469 
43,306 


United States lo Soulh America 


Europe to South America 


Cristobal to South America 




Europe to wes( coast of North America 




Europe to Australia and New Zealand 


* 8 997 


United States to Australia and New Zealand 


31 505 


United States to Far East . 




Cristobal to west coast of North America. . 


6,484 
18,900 


Mexico to west coast of North America 




Miscellaneous 


2,440 




Total 


72 

15 

31 
7 
3 

16 
5 

10 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 


265,725 

52,091 
74,181 
19.91S 
5,373 
22,169 
25,624 
76,661 
9,984 
9,333 
11.119 
6,385 
5,531 
2,092 


317,358 

65,479 
98 532 


Pacific to Atlantic. 
United States coastwise 


West coast, North America to Europe. . 


West coast. South America to United States 

West coast, North America to Cristobal 

West coast, South America to Cristobal.. . 
West coast, South America to Mexico 


17,714 
3.161 
18,966 


Australia and New Zealand to Europe 


72 401 


Far East to east coast of North America 


15 730 


Australia and New Zealand to east coast ot North America 


11,182 


West coast, South America to Europe 


10,191 


West coast, North America to Mexico.. . . 




Far East to Europe 


6 230 


Miscellaneous. 


1 326 






Total 


98 


320,461 


;',"U. U12 



* Ballast. 
SERVICES TO CANAL SHIPPING. 

Repairs were made on 111 vessels during the month, 68 at Cristobal and 43 at 
Balboa. Ten vessels were dry-docked at Cristobal and 10 at Balboa. Sales of fuel 
oil to ships from stock of The Panama Canal, were 814 barrels to 4 vessels at Cristobal 
and 3,367 barrels to 1 vessel at Balboa. Coal sales were 38,739 tons to 1 16 vessels at 
Cristobal aid 5,313 tons to 26 vessels at Balboa, a total of 142 vessels receiving 44,052 
tons. Water sold included 10,246,395 gallons to 190 vessels at Cristobal and 3,266,250 
gallons to 120 at Balboa, a total of 13,512,645 gallons to 310 vessels. Sales of com- 
missary supplies to commercial ships of lines other than that of the Panama Railroad, 
aggregated $84,732.44, of which S54.458.78 worth, including $1,693.79 for laundry, 
was supplied at Cristobal, $6.60 at Gatun, and $30,267.06, including $714.12 from 
A neon laundry, at Balboa. Laundry service for all ships amounted to $3,965.53. 
Tug service performed for vessels using the Canal and the terminal ports was charged 
at $20,398.35, of which $11,411.25 was collected through the office of the Captain 
of the Portal Cristobal and $8,987. 10 at Balboa. 

STATEMEN1 OF OPERATIONS. 

Details of the business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals of the Canal 
are shown in the following tabulations: 



Item. 


Cristobal. 


Balboa. 


Total. 


Commercial ships making transit of Can::! 


72 
265,725 
220,004 
346,343 
215,205 
317.35S 
426 

25 
4 
3 


98 
320,461 
272,358 

418,702 
273,190 

320,!) 12 
7,495 

26 
5 
4 
5 


170 


Net tonnage of commercial ships, Panama Canal measurement . 


5S6 186 


United States equivalent n it tonnage ol commercial sliips 


402.362 
765,050 

4ss.:;o:> 
63^ 270 


Registered oet tonnage >>i commercial ships . 


Cargo through ('anal in commercial ships, tons of 2,2-10 pounds . . 


Deck loa;l cargo, included in above . . 


7 921 


Nationality <>f commercial ships through Canal: 
British 


51 
9 

'7 
5 


N'orwc.'ii!! 


Peruvian. 


French . 


Chinese 


1 
4 


1 


Chilean 
Swedish 


3 

1 
1 


7 
1 


•Japanese 


6 
27 


7 


Outeh 


2 


United States 


53 


80 






Total . . 


72 


98 


170 



150 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECOKD 



Item. 1 Cristobal. 


Balboa. 


Total. 


Panama Canal net tonnage of commercial ships through the Canal: 

British 


90,030 
16,756 
8,272 


118,390 
13,716 
8,954 
6,379 


208,420 
30,472 
17 226 






French 


6,379 
3,801 




3,801 
11,111 




8,078 
3,967 
5,820 


19 189 




3,967 




31,097 
11,823 
92,835 


36,717 


Dutch 


11 823 




155,357 


248,192 






Total 


265,725 

77,973 
13.955 
6,846 


320,401 

99,139 
12,303 
6,914 
5,861 


586,186 


United States equivalent net tonnage of commercial ships through the 
Canal: 


177,112 




26,258 
13,760 




5 861 




3,707 
6,891 


3,707 




4,928 
2,307 
4,545 


11,819 




2,307 




27,506 
8,477 
74,649 


32,051 


Dutch 


8,477 




136, S61 


211,010 






Total 


220,004 

116.838 
21,791 
12,641 


272,358 

152,871 
18,059 
12.913 
10,131 


492,362' 


Registered gross tonnage of commercial ships through the Canal: 
British 


269,709 


Norwegian 


39,850- 




25,554 




10,131 




5,174 
12,894 


5,174- 


Chilean 


9,080 
3,774 
7,085 


21,374 


Swedish 


3,774. 




41,284 

13,593 

122,133 


48,369. 


Dulch 


13,593 




204,789 


326,922 






Total 


346,348 

73,171 
13,616 
7,583 


418,702 

97,521 
12 282 


765,050- 


Registered net tonnage of commercial ships, through the Canal: 
British 


170,692 




9.=i 809. 


Peruvian 


7,S69 ' I5«2 


French 


6,363 


6,363 




3.707 
7,793 


3,707 




5,505 

2,875 
4,387 


13,298- 




2 , 875 




26,219 

8,643 

74,473 


30,606 


Dutch 


8,643 




136,398 


210,861 






Total 


215,205 

104,454 

22,777 

2,501 


273,190 

107,565 
5,582 
6,786 
6,487 


488,395 


Cargo carried by ships of various nationalities: 

British 


212 019 


Norwegian 


28,359 
9,287 


Peruvian 


French 


6,487 


Chinese 


6.300 
3,608 


6,300 


Chilean 


5,369 
1,270 
0,420 


8,977 




1,270 




43,706 
8,232 

125,780 


53 126 


Dutch 


8,232 


United States 


178,433 


304,213 






Total 


317, 35S 

1 
1 

4 
2 


320,912 


638,270 
1 


Vessels passing through the Canal free of tolls: 


U. S. Navy Mine Depot ships 




1 


U. S. Navy destroyers 




4. 


U. S. Navy tugs 




2 


U. S. Army mine-plar ter 


1 


1 




1 
3 


1 






3 








Total 


12 

1 

5 

84 

85 

22,295 

7 

28,376 


1 

3 

5 

99 

102 


13 




4- 


Net tonnage of launches, Panama Canal measurement 


1C' 


Total ocean-going ships transiting Canal 


183 


Total vessels transiting Cana! 


187 


Cargo on which no tolls were charred" 


22,295 


Commercial ships through Canal without cargo, but not in ballast 

Commercial ships through Canal in ballast 


1 

4S3 

10 

47,654 

11 

48,147 


8- 

28,859 
10 


Net tonnage of ahove, Canal measurement , 




47,664 




7 
28,376 


18- 




76,523- 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



151 



Item. 



Cristobal. 



Balboa. 



Total. 



Motor ships through Canal 

. Nil tonnage of motor ships, Canal measurement. , 

B&King ships throi ;h the Canal 

Net tonnage of Bailing ships, Canal measurement. 

Yachts through the Canal 

Net tonnage of yachts, Canal measurement 

Tolls levied on laden ships through the Canal 

Tolls 1? \ ied on ships in ballast 

Tolls on launches 



8244,199.70 
'"'o\66 



8,317 

6 

8,665 

1 

483 

$290,801.45 

34,372 74 

4 90 



7 

8,386 

6 

8,665 

1 

483 

$535,001.15 

34,372.74 

10.90 



i Total to'ls levied. .• 

Total ships entering port, including Canal transit. 
Total ships clearing port, including Canal transit . 



Total ships nandled 

Net registered tonnage of vessels entering port. 
Net registered tonnage of vessel.? clearing port. 



Total for vessels entering and clearing 

Registered gross tonnage of vessels entering 

Registered gross tonnage of vessels clearing 

Total registered gross tonnage of vessels entering and clearing 

Vessels entering port, but not passing through Canal 

Net tonnage of above 

, Gross tonnage of above 

Vessels clearing port, but not passing through Canal 

Net tonnage of above 

i Gross tonnage of above 

Vessels passing through Canal, and handling passengers or cargo at 

port entered 

Net tonnage of above 

Gross tonnage of above. .'. 

Vessels passing through Canal, and handling passengers or cargo at port 

cleared 

Net tonnage of above 

Gross tonnage of above 

Transit cargo arriving tons. 

Transit cargo cleared tons. 

Local qargo arriving tons. 

Local cargo i hipped tons. 

Total local cargo handled tons. 

Total local and transit car>:o arriving tons. 

Total local and tr red tons. 

Cargrj received by Ri -y of P. R. R. . . .tons. 

Cargo dispatched bj Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R.tons. 
Cargo rebandled by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R.. .tons 

Total cargo bandied by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of 

i P.R.R tons. 

Cargo stevedored, included in abo- e tons. 

Commercial vessels other than 1'. R. R. supplied with bunker coal 

Coal supplied to commercial vessels other than Panama Railroad... .tons. 

Panama Railroad vessels supplied with bunker coal 

CoaJ supplied 1'anama Railroad Steamship Line tons 

U. S. Navy vessels supplied with bunker ceal 

Coal supplied U. S. Navy vessels tons. 

U. S. Army vessels supplied with coal 

Coal supplied to U. S. Army vessels tens. 

Total vessels supplied with coal 

Total coal furnished to vessels tons. 

Coal supplied Panama Railroad departments tons. 

Coal supplied Armv, excepting vessels tons. 

Coal supplied The Panama Canal tons. 

Coal supplied individuals and companies tons. 

Total coal furnished tons. 

Coal received during September tons. 

Coal on hand, Octoher 1 tons. 

Vessels supplied with water 

Water sold to ships gals . 

Vessels dry-docked .'.'.' 

Commercial vessels furnished commissary supplies 

Panama Railroad vessels furnished commissary supplies 

Other U.; S. Government vessels furnished commissary supplies 

Total vessels furnished commissary supplies 

Commissary sales to commercial vessels. 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

\\ holesals eold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 



$244,205 70 
214 
211 



$325,179.09 
192 
186 



425 
648,270 
633,744 



378 
535,740 

530,684 



1,282,014 

1,008,008 

984,429 



Total. 



1,992,437 

43 
127,758 
207,358 

37 
117,176 
190,676 

29 
65.407 
107.589 

29 

62,843 

103,434 

668,184 

663,060 
28,754 
3,252 



32,006 



696,938 
titiii,312 
60,406 
58,540 
1,159 



1,066,424 
827,014 
819,447 



1,646,461 

4 
11,014 
16,746 

5 
11,995 
18,514 

32 
46,174 
76.46S 

32 

46,174 

76,4h8 

655,435 

578,967 

14,217 

433 



14.650 



120,105 

53,292 

65 

34,928 

4 

699 

2 

2,838 

5 

274 

106 

38,739 

642 

94 

1,941 

4.32 



41,868 

14,937 

59,685 

190 

10,246,395 

10 

131 

10 

21 



162 

$1,249 46 

12,343.58 

35,905.33 

1,693.79 

3,266.62 

$54,458.78 



609,652 

579,400 

3,042 

3,675 

1,636 



8,353 

1,054 

20 

4,914 

1 

1 

3 

352 

2 

46 

26 

5,313 

40 



895 



6,048 

12,114 

9,066 

120 

3,266,250 

10 

71 



10 



87 

$605.19 

6,669.91 

18,941.98 

3.07 

3.332.79 

$29,552.94 



$569,384 79 
406 
397 



803 
1,184.010 
1,164.428 



2,348,438 
1,835,022 
1,803,878 



3,638,898 

47 
138,772 
224,104 

42 
129,171 
209,190 

61 
111,581 
184,057 

61 

109,017 

179,902 

1,323,619 

1,242,027 

42,97 1 

3.6W 



46,656 



1,366,590 

1,245,712 

63,448 

62,215 

2,795 



128,458 

54,346 

115 

39,842 

5 

700 

5 

3,190 

7 

320 

132 

44,052 

682 

94 

2,638 

452 



47,916 

27,051 

68,751 

310 

13,512,645 

20 

202 

10 

37 



249 

$1,854.6* 

19,813 49 

54,847.31 

1,696.86 

6,599.41 

$84,011.72 



152 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Item. 




Cristobal. 


Balboa. 


Total. 


Commissary sales to Panama Railroad vessels: . 
Ice 


$57.75 

1,391 38 

6,893 53 

614 84 

994.38 




$57 75 


Wholesale groceries 




1 391 38 






6,893.53 
614 84 




Miscellaneous 




994 38 








Total 


$9,951 88 

$626.88 

2,172 47 

16,863 06 

799.81 

1,089.48 




$9,951 88 


Commissary sales to other Government vessels: 


$361.57 

4,023 25 

15,460 14 

130.90 

208.21 


$988 25 




6 195 72 




3' 323 20 


Laundry 


939 11 




1 297 69 








Total 


$21,551.70 


820,192.87 


$41 744 57 




. . barrels . 




Total commissary sales to vessels 

Ft.el oil sold to commercial vesse.'s 

Fuel oil issued to U. S. Navy 

Fuel oil issued to U. S. Arrov 

Other sales, issues, and consumption at plant 


$85,962 36 
814 
200 
63S 

6,562 
290 


$49,745.81 
3.367 

198 

14,235 

184 


$135,708.17 

4,181 

200 

836 

20,797 

474 


Total furnished trom Canal tanks 

Fuel oil on hand October 1 

Other oil pumped 

Diesel oil issued to Canal departments 

Diesel oil on hand October 1 


.8,504 

15,640 

213,456 


17,984 

81,731 

11.764 

17 

1,499 

1,809 
2 449 


26,488 

97,371 

225.220 

17 

1,499 


Passengers arriving, including transit passengers: 




3,107 
3,308 


4,916 




5,757 








Total 


6,415 

3,209 
4,189 


4,258 

1,795 
2,414 


10,673 


Total passengers departing including transit passengers: 

First cabin 


5,004 




6,603 








Total 


7,398 
13,813 

1,567 
734 


4,209 
8,467 

233 
101 


11,607 




. 22,280 


Passengers disembarking: 


1,800 




835 








Total 


2,301 

1,867 
2,180 


334 

219 
66 


2.635 








2,086 




2.246 








Total 


4.047 

138 
88 
9 
27 


285 

63 

51 

6 


4.332 


Services to American seamen: 


201 




139 




15 




27 










262 
$8,928.07 
3,408.84 
12.336.91 

1 
1 
1 
16 


120 

$3,423 59 

1,495. CO 

4,180.19 


582 




$12,351.66 




4,904.44 




16,517.10 


Service? to American vessels: 


1 






1 




2 

7 


3 




23 







LOCK OPERATIONS. 
Lockages of commercial vessels were made during the month as follows: 





Number of lockages. 


Number of vessels. 




North. 


South. 


Tola). 


North. 1 South. 


Total. 




97 
100 
93 


71 

76 
72 


168 
176 
165 


99 75 

100 77 
99 | 75 


174 




177 




174 



Lockages of Army and Navy vessels, vessels operated by The Panama Canal, and 
of commercial vessels, are included in the following summary of all lockages during the 
month: 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



153 



Lockages. 


Gatun. 


Pedro 
Migjel. 


Miraflores. 




168 
6 
2 


176 
6 
29 


165 




5 




31 






Total 


176 

174 
27 


211 

177 
75 


201 


Vessels: 


174 




75 






Total 


201 


252 


249 



Water consumed for all lockages amounted to 1,367,930.000 cubic feet, that used 
at Pedro Miguel becoming available for second use at Miraflores locks. 
Consumption of water by the locks during the month was as follows: 





Gatun. 


Pedro Miguel. 


Miraflores. 




Cubic feet. 
734,650,000 
20,000,000 


Cubic leet. 

633,280,000 
29,520,000 
27,390,000 


Cubic feet. 
607,600,000 




15,000,000 




8.240,000 








Total 


754,650.000 


690,190,000 


630,840,000 







METEOROLOGY. 

Rainfall during the month was above the average at 11 stations and deficient at 
8 stations, the deficiency being well marked over the Atlantic section. Rainfall totals 
ranged from 8.33 inches at Miraflores to 22.52 inches at the Indio station on the upper 
Chagres. The greatest precipitation in 24 hours was 3.96 inches, at Monte Lirio on 
the 8th. 

A slight seismic disturbance was recorded at Balboa Heights on the evening of Sep- 
tember 26. Although the maximum amplitude of the record was 10 millimeters, so 
far as is known no one in this vicinity felt the quake. The epicenter of this disturb- 
ance was about 370 miles distant. The principal waves moved in a north-south di- 
rection, but the seat of the disturbance is unknown. 

The Chagres River discharge at Alhajuela was 7 per cent below the 18-year Sep- 
tember average, or 2,996 c. f. s. against a mean of 3,232 c. f. s. The Chagres furnished 
33 per cent of the Gatun Lake total yield. There was one freshet in the Chagres 
River during the month with a rise of more than 5 feet at Alhajeula. 

The elevation of Gatun Lake on September 30 was 85.47 feet, as compared with 
85.29 at the end of the prior month. 

A severe wind storm occurred at Gamboa on the afternoon of September 26, 
during which a maximum velocity of 50 miles an hour was recorded from the north- 
east. The two unloading cranes at the Gamboa gravel plant were overturned and 
wrecked, causing damage estimated at about $20,000. 

ELECTRICAL DIVISION. 

Gatun hydroelectric station — The net output of the hydroelectric station for the 
month of September was 5,060,617 K. W. H., and the computed water consumption 
was 3.925,910,000 cubic feet. 

Miraflores steam plant — The net output of the steam plant was minus 165,170 
K. W. H., and the oil consumption was 2,054.46 barrels. The removal of a span of 
the bridge at Gamboa and cutting the transmission line on September 29 made it 
necessary for the Miraflores plant to carry for 2\ hours all of the load on the system 
south of Gamboa. Seven extra boilers and three extra turbines were thrown into 
service for this. 

Total power output — The total power output for both generating stations was 
4,895,447 K. W. H., and the total amount of power distributed to feeders by substa- 
tions and generating plants was 4,366,387 K. \V. H., representing an energy loss 
of 10.8 per cent. 

Transmission line — There were 3 interruptions to transmission service during 
the month, due respectively to an animal on the line, failure of a roof bushing, and 
failure of insulator and bushing during a severe lightning storm. The maximum in- 
terruption of service to any station was 35 minutes. 

Marine work — Repairs and additions of electrical equipment were made at Cris- 
tobal on the following vessels, under 15 work orders: Middlebury, Dakotan, Mada- 
waska, Aim-well, General Ernst, Cansumset, Gray Eagle, West Harsaw, Fort Wright, 
Advance, Boxbutte, Bcnoni, and Colon. Work was in progress at the end of the month 
on the cable ship Cyrus II'. Field, dredge Gamboa, steamship Caribbean, U. S. M. P. 
Graham and the steamship Colon. At Balboa, electrical work was done on the fol- 
lowing vessels: Anubis, Cristobal, barge No. 13, barge No. 29, Azov, Guardian, Oro- 



154 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Una, Aimwell, tug Empire, Kavgi, Graham, Los Angeles, Bushrod, clapet No. 7, 
Falketind, Ardmore, Okiya, dredges Corozal and Cascadas, Ulysses, tugGorgona, dredge 

No. 86, Bonifay, dredge No. 84, Melville, Adela, Asotin, Medford, Cresap, Buhisan, 
and tug Galun. 

1 New construction — Installation of electrical equipment at Mount Hope cold storage 
plant remains about the same as last month, 96 per cent completed. Electrical in- 
stallation at Pier 6, Cristobal, was advanced from 80 to 95 per cent of completion. 
Electrical work at the slaughterhouse at Mount Hope was completed during the month. 
There were 378 work orders issued for work to be performed by different sections of 
the Electrical Division during the month. 

SHOPS, FOUNDRY, AND DRY DOCK WORK. 

The repairs to the ex-German vessel Anubis (renamed Paita) were completed 
except for finishing touches and trial. Steam was raised on the ship's boilers for the 
first time and a short preliminary trial was held on September 30. 

The work on the outside hull of the steamship Cristobal, below the water line, inci- 
dental to converting to oil burning, and overhaul of machinery were completed, and 
the vessel was removed from dry dock. Satisfactory general progress was made on 
the vessel during the month. A considerable amount of steel work for the fuel oil 
tanks and miscellaneous water-tight subdivision was erected and partly riveted. 

A number of small jobs were performed on naval vessels transiting the Canal. 
The usual run of water-front repairs was accomplished; this class of work being 
particularly heavy, especially on wooden ships. 

Steel reinforcing knees were worked under the stern of the steamship Bushrod to 
strengthen the overhanging rudderpost of the vessel. 

The boilers of the steamship A imu ell were rebuilt and the engine? completely over- 
hauled, including realignment and refitting of all brasses. 

A general overhaul of a similar nature, but to lesser extent, was given the machinery 
of the wooden steamships Okiya, Bonifay, and Asotin. 

At the Cristobal shops the following vessels arrived for repairs: Steamships Chetac, 
Adolph Wcerman, Afalkey, Finnisterre, Chimo, Santa Alicia, Albert Metin, Boxbutte, 
West Harsaw, Ad-way, Chiquimala, Salvador, Fonduco, Arapasho, West Cayote, 
Slavic Prince, Chili, Iquitos, Manuel Calvo, Jamaica, Kangi, Balboa, Panama, Allianca, 
Colon, Middlebury, Culebra, Advance, General Ernst, Lake Wilson, Lake Hurst, Lake 
Graphite, Ucayali, Coppename, Bassano, Hudson, Aft. Hamilton, Imperial, C-39, 
St. Louis, Erie, Mahnet, Tripp, Urubamba, C. W. Fields, Caddo, Dakotan, Ft. Logan, 
Saucon, Umatilla, Cansumset, Metapan, Corvallis, Dclaura, Huasco, Cauca, Noitotiian, 
Crowley, derrick barge No. 157, barge No. 17 ', tug Engineer, U. S. A. T. Madawaska, 
A.G. Forse, U. S. M. T. Graham, U. S. A. T. Bufvrd, launch Wilhelm, motor schooner 
Laura C. Hall. 

Of the above, the following were in dry dock during the month: Crowley, derrick 
barge No. 157, barge No. 17, Salvador, C. W. Fields, Laura C. Hall, Graham, launch 
Wilhelm, tvgB Engineer and A.G. Forse. 

At the Cristobal shops 211 individual and company job orders were issued during 
the month, 1 of which was for work on a submarine, and 2 on other Navy craft. 
Of the remaining 208, 86 covered repairs to ships making this port or in transit of the 
Canal, exclusive of Panama Railroad ships. The work of overhauling the steamship 
Culebra prior to turning over to the Dredging Division was continued during the 
month. The extension of the shops' tool room and the laying of concrete in same were 
completed during the month. The extension of an air line to and on pier No. 6, 
Cristobal, was continued during the month. 

Work was performed at the Balboa shops during the month for the following 
vessels: Kangi, Azov, Bushrod, Aimwell, Cristobal, Anubis, Aysen, Gray Eagle, 
Lompoc, Los Angeles, Santa Alicia, Ardmore, Okiya, Ulysses, Coalinga, Bonifay, 
Slavic Prince, Asctin, Joan of Arc, Medford, Brasher, Buhisan, Minnequa, Delfina, 
cable ship Guardian, U. S. M. P. Graham, M. S. Patridge No. 16, Cardinal, 
South Dakota, Lydonia, Melville, Dorsey, destroyer No. 106, destroyer Bailey, motor 
ships Santa Elena, Orolina, Chiriqui, Adela, and Laura C. Hall, schooners Falketind, 
and Ludlow, dredge Corozal, and steamship Cresap. 

The following vessels were in dry dock at Balboa during the month: Cable ship 
Guardian, tug Bolivar, tug Galun (twice), steamships Aysen, Cristobal, Bushrod, and 
Anubis {Paita), dredge Corozal, and U. S. S. Melville. 

Foundry output, compared with that of August, was as follows: 



September. August 



Iron. 
Steel. 



Pounds 
117,173 
26,361 
27.B971 



Pounds. 
130,226} 
34,860 
26,086) 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



155 



Equipment was host led as follows: Locomotives, 1,554; cranes, 200; making a 
total of 1,754. Two hundred 'and twenty-eight shop and 1,382 field repairs were 
made on cars, 788 freight cars were repacked, and 3,100 passenger coaches were packed, 
cleaned, oiled, and inspected. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 

Erection of the Puerto Obaldia radio station was 75 per cent completed at the end 
of the month. 

Installation of abattoir equipment at Mount Hope, the machine shop at Mount 
Hope, and the ten 12-family silver quarters, Mount Hope, were all completed during 
September. 

The office for the Lighthouse Subdivision at Gatun was completed. 

The office building for the Central and South American Telegraph Company at 
Balboa, was 55 per cent completed at the end of the month. 

Terminal construction — On Pier No. 6, Cristobal, the doors were 99 per cent com- 
pleted, cranes, 50 per cent completed, and washing walls, 90 per cent completed at 
the end of the month. Placing concrete floor slabs in the reconstruction of the Royal 
Mail pier, Colon, was 50 per cent completed. 

DREDGING DIVISION. 

The total excavation by dredges during the month of September was 236,825 cubic 
yards, as follows: 



Cubic yards. 



a 10.000 
a 28.125 
6 40,600 
c 20,300 
c 30,000 
c 6,400 
d 84,900 
d 10.500 



236,825 



Classified a*: 



Earth. 



10.000 
20,000 
46,600 
20.300 
30,000 
6,400 
15,900 



149,200 



Hock. 



8,125 



69,000 

10,500 



Character 
of work. 



Maintenance. 
Maintenance. 
Maintenance. 
Maintenance. 
Maintenance. 
Maintenance. 
Aux. Const... 
Aux. Const... 



87,625 Total for month 



Stations. 



Equipment. 



1746-50 to 1741-00 W 

1802-00 to 1762-50 E and W. 

2219-00 to 2231-00 E 

Balboa Inner Harbor 

Balboa Inner Harbor 

Balboa Inner Harbor 

Area No. 10, Cristobal 

Area No. 11, Cristobal 



Paraiso. 
Para i 30. 
No. 84. 
Cascadas. 
No. 86. 
No. 84. 
Gamboa. 
Gamboa. 



(o) Gaillard Cut. (b) Pacific entrance. (c) Balboa inner harbor. (d) Atlantic terminal. 

The following disposition was made of the excavated material: Forty-six thousand 
six hundred cubic yards were dumped in the San Juan fill; 20,300 cubic yards at 
sea beyond the Pacific entrance; 36,400 cubic yards in Diablo Dump "A;" 38,125 
cubic yards in Cat tin Lake, north of Gamboa; and 95,400 cubic yards between the 
east end of the East Breakwater and Margarita Point. 

The excavation remaining to be done in the Canal prism on October 1, was 173,- 
200 cubic yards of earth and rock, and from the Cristobal coaling station and Balboa 
inner harbor, 2,100 cubic yards, and 167,800 cubic yards, respectively. The total 
construction excavation to be done is comprised of 215,700 cubic yards of earth and 
127,400 cubic > ards of rock. 

Mindi dykes and groins were maintained, the destruction of water hyacinths was 
continued, weekly surveys were made covering stations 1795 to 1775 and 1750 to 
1738, and both of these areas were dragged daily. Surveys were made behind the 
dredges in the Pacific entrance, Balboa inner harbor, Gaillard Cut, and Atlantic 
terminals. Charts of all dredged, mined, and surveyed areas were prepared. 

MUNICIPAL DIVISION. 

The truck and cart oil-filling station at the Mount Hope oil handling plant was 
completed during the month. No work was done on the installation of water line6 
for the cold storage plant, or on the roads, and water and sewer lines for the group 
of 12-family silver quarters at Mount Hope. In the installation of the circulating 
water system for the cold storage plant, 1,905 linear feet of 20-inch dredge pipe were 
embedded in concrete, excavation and backfilling were carried on, and the work as 
a whole advanced to 85 per cent of completion. Grading and filling for the new silver 
townsite were 75 per cent completed; 11,507 cubic yards of fill were placed during 
September. The construction of sewer from North Avenue, Panama, to the beach 
was 50 per cent completed; work during the month included excavating 1,226 
cubic yards, placing 835 cubic yards of backfill, and constructing 437 linear feet of 
box sewer, averaging approximately 4 by 4| feet in cross section. 

Water pumped in the northern distiict amounted to 217,168,500 gallons, and i» 
the southern district to 569,711,000 gallons, making a total of 786,S79,500gallons, as 
compared with 825,.U5, 000 gallons in August, Colon was furnished with 53,230,000 
gallons, Panama with 86,526,000 gallons, and 13,512,645 gallons were sold to 310 
ships. The incinerator at Gavilan Island burned 2,104 tons of garbage and 31 dead 
animals during September. 



156 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



WORKING FORCE. 

Effective September 24, 1919. 



Department or Division. 



Gold. 


Silver. 


43 


44 


29S 


1,952 


250 


370 


125 


2.4G7 


164 


599 


147 


844 


963 


1,827 


140 


374 


64 


265 


2,203 


8,722 


157 


1,802 


30 


404 


249 


1,586 


32 


708 


247 


11 


240 


1 , 06i> 


482 


162 


08 


537 


157 


281 


90 


2,091 


61 


764 





98 


4,050 


18,253 



Total. 



Operation and Maintenance: 

Office 

Building Division 

Electrical Division 

Municipal Engineering Division 

Lock Operation 

Dredging Division 

Mechanical Division 

Marine Division 

Fortifications 



Total 

Supply Department:. 

Quartermaster 

Subs'stence 

Commissary 

Cattle Industry— Plantations 

Accounting 

Health 

Executive 

Panama Railroad: 

Superintendent 

Transportation 

Receiving and Forwarding Agent. 

Coaling Station 

Hotel Washington 



Grand total 



87 

2,230 

629 

2,592 

763 

991 

2,790 

514 

329 

10,925 

1.959 
434 

1,835 
740 
258 

1 ,309 
664 

605 
438 
2,190 
845 
101 

22,303 



The total pold foice at work on Septen ber 24, was 51 more than the 3,°99 at work 
on August 20, and the silver force was 374 more than the 17,879 then at work. 
Ascomr ared with the edd force for the corresponding month of last year, reported 
as of September 18, 1918, the gold force was an increase of 1,085 over the 2,965 at 
work on that date, and the silver force an increase of 2,056 over the 16,197 of that 
day. 

The occupation of quarters on September 30, was as follows: 



Occupants. 


Men. 


Women. 

2,146 

41 

2,01 1 


Children. 


Total. 


Americans 

Europeans 

West Indians 




3,425 

181 
5,320 


2,606 

56 

3,747 


8,178 

278 
11,087 


Total 


8.936 


4,198 


6,409 


19,543 



PUBLIC HEALTH. 

One hundred and twelve cases of malaria were reported during the month of Sep- 
tember, as compared with 202 cases during the month of August. One death 
occurred from, malaria. Influenza admissions numbered 17, as compared with 20 dur- 
ing the preceding month. There were no deaths from influenza. There were 15 
admissions and 2 deaths from pneumonia, as compared with 11 admissions and 5 
deaths during the preceding month. Typhoid fever caused 5 admissions, 3 of whom 
were nonresidents; 1 a nonresident, white American, died. Five cases of small- 
pox were admitted. There were no deaths from smallpox. 

RECEIPTS AND SALES OF MATERIAL AND SUPPLIES. 

The value of material received during the month on United States requisitions was 
$499,551.88, ascompared with $525,760.57 in August. Of that received in September,. 
$457,892.14 was chargeable to operation and maintenance; $19,570.27 to construc- 
tion and equipment; and $22,089.47 to miscellaneous departments. Isthmian cash 
sales from storehouses and obsolete store amounted to $36,914.77 of which $35,972.59 
was for stock, $484.33 for scrap, and $457.84 for obsolete and second-hand material. 
The more important sales made in the United States were as follows: One thousand 
two hundred tons of No. 2 heavy melting steel, $24,000; 212 net tons No. 1 wheels, 
cast iron, $5,568; 1,021 net tons steel plate, $20,981.58; one 24-horsepcwer engine, 
gasoline, and equipment, $600; and 27,1.15 rounds cf scrap copper screening 
and wire, $4,947.76. 

The total sales of material from storehouses to steamships for the month including 
fuel oil, but excluding sales by the Comm.issary Division, amounting to $135,708.17 
were $19,788.01. Sales of commissary supplies to all purchasers for the month 
aggregated $967,582.40, made up as follows: To steamships, other than United States 
naval vessels and those of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, $87,055.23; to The 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



157 



Par.aira Canal, $115,092.22; to the United Slates Governrrer.t, including sales to 
the Army and Navy, $1 7°, #66.56; to individuals and companies, principally through 
charge accounts in the retail stores, $16,568.34; to the Panama Railroad including 
its steamships and the Hotel Washington, $43,383.65; and to individuals purchasing 
with coupons, $525,616.40. 

FINANCIAL RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The cash balance in Canal appropriations on September 30, exclusive of forti- 
fications, was $15,453,896.17; the balance in fortifications was $7,773,889.30. 
Payments from appropriations by Disbursing Clerk in Washington, amounted to 
$510,016.25 and by the Paymaster on the Isthmus to $1,705,118.19. Purchases of 
comn issarv boohs from the Panama Railroad Company amounted to $340,853.50. 
Collections' of tolls totaled $588,993.99. Deposits of $235, 705.43 were made with the 
Assistant Treasurer of the United States to be applied on payment of tolls and other 
charges against vessels using the Canal. The total Panama Canal collections on 
the Isthmus were $1,981,092.45, and collections by the Disbursing Clerk, Wash- 
ington, $398,483.89. Receipts from the Canal Zone and miscellaneous funds were 
$155,910.59, and disbursements from the same source amounted to $130,618.30. 
September payrolls on the Isthmus aggregated $1,203,824.84, as compared with 
$1,222,868.69 for August, a difference of $19,043.85. 

Respectfully, 

Chester Harding, Governot. 



Report of Cargo Discharged ard Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Fort of Cristobal for Week Ending November 1, 1919. 



V'anie of vessel. 



Line or charterer. 



Huasco 

Mendocino 

Orca 

Gen. G. W. Goethals. 

Ebro 

Acajutla 

Antillian 

Mctapan I 

Turrialba 

Cauea ' 

Nobles i 

Middlebury 

Imperial 

Zacapa | 

Balboa I 

Salvador 

Ulysses 

Laura 0. Hall ' 

Urubamba 

San Mateo 

Perou : 

rjcayali 

Chautauqua 



Arrived. 



United Fruit Company 

United States Shipping Board 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. . I October 26. 

Royal Mail Steam Packet Co October 27.. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co ! October 27. 

Leyland Line. I 

United Fruit Company ! October 27.. 

United Fruit Company October 29. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co I 

United States Shipping Board I 

Panama Railroad Commissary j October 29. 

United Fruit Company October 29.. 

United Fruit Company October 30.. 

Colombian Maritime Co October 30. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co j October 30. 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. October 31. . 

Pacific Metals Corporation October 31. 

Peruvian Line | 

United Fruit Company I November 1. 

French Line ' November 1. 

Peruvian Line j November 1. 

United States Shipping Board < November 1. 



Departed. 



October 26. . 
October 26. . 
October 26 . 
Novembe- 1. 
October 28. . 
October 30. . 
October 29. 
October 30. 
October 30. . 
October 30. 
October 30. 



October 31. 



November 1... 
November 1... 



Cargo — 



Discharged Laded 



Tom. 



1 . 130 

C) 
772 



20] 

11 



400 
1,539 



758 

12,194 

38 



150 

477 

1,643 

2.696 



Tons. 
446 

(t) 
(+) 
4,320 

162 
(t) 

804 



(t) 



709 



(t) 



489 



' No cargo discharged. 



tNo cargo laded. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending November 1, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 




Union Oil Company 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co. 
Pacific Metals Corporation 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co 

United States Navv 


October 25. . . . 
October 26. . . . 
October 26. . . 
October 30. . 
October 30. 
October 30. 
October 30. 
October 31... 
August 16 


October 26. . . 
October 27.... 
October 26. . . . 
October 30... . 


Ton*. 
1,263 
30 
5 


Tom. 
1.2S6 
7 








Cauca 


1 


Salvador 


October 30. . . . 
October 31... 
November 1.... 
October 31... 
October 29.. 


188 

5 

8,571 

2 




Laura C. Hall 




Baldbutte 




City of Para 




Melville. 


*37 



* Left out of report of October 25. 



158 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAJl. RE( UKU 



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160 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Longest Ship through the Canal. 

The United States Army transport Mount Vernon, passing through 
the Canal on October 28 en route from New York to San Francisco, 
completing the Canal transit in 8 hours 18 minutes, is the longest, 
though not the largest ship to have used the Canal to date. Her 
length between perpendiculars is 685 feet 4 inches, and length over all 
712 feet. The previous record for length was held by the steamship 
Ceramic, which passed through the Canal from Pacific to Atlantic on 
December 12, 1917, and which is 655 feet 1 inch in length between 
perpendiculars, 680 feet over all. The Mount Vernon drew 33 feet 
6 inches of water at the time of transit, exceeding by 10 inches the 
draft of the dreadnaught Mississippi, which is 624 feet in length and 
which transited the Canal on July 25 and 26, 1919. In beam and 
gross and net tonnage, the Mount Vernon is exceeded by the steamship 
Minnesota, which is 645 feet over all, and which transited the Canal 
from Pacific to Atlantic on February 27, 1917. 

Data on the 6 largest ships which have used the Canal are sum- 
marized herewith: 



Vessel. 



Length 
between 
perpen- 
diculars. 



Beam. 



Draft 
at time 
of tran- 
sit. 



Registered 

gross 
tonnage. 



Panama 

Canal 

net 

tonnage. 



Date of transit 



Ceramic. . . 
Minnesota. 
Mississippi 



Mount Vernon . 
New Mexico. . . 



Von Steuben 



655' 1" 

622' 

600' 

685' 4" 
600' 

637' 3" 



69' 4' 
73' 5' 

97' 41 

72' 2' 
97' A\ 

6fi' 3'' 



29' 8" 
28' 0" 
32' 8" 

33' 6" 
32' 11" 

29' 10" I 



18,481 
20.602 
32,000 

Displacement 
18,372 
32,000 

Displacement 
14.908 



13,607 
15,777 



December 12, 1917. 
February 27. 1917. 
July 26, 1919 



Pacific to Atlantic. 
Pacific to Atlantic. 
Atlantic to Pacific. 

Atlantic to Pacific. 
Atlantic to Pacific. 



rtp.rpjnr.pr ''Q 1917. . . ' Atlantic to Pacific. 



October 29. 1919 
July 25, 1919... 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details cf the examinations for positions for which there 
are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal 
post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights, telephone 286: 

Assistant in cotton grading (male); SI, 200 to 52,000 a year; No. 497; November 23, 1919; form 
1312; age, at least 21 but not 35 years. 

Plasterer (male) ; $75 a month; No. 511; November 25, 1919; form 1800; age, at least 20 years.* 

Typewriter repairman (male) ; S900 to SI, 520 a year; No. 512; November 25, 1919; form 304; age, 
at least 18 vears.* 

Lockmaker (male); $4.50 per diem; No. 513; November 25, 1919; form 1800; age, at least 20 
years.* 

Artist (male and female); previously announced, closed October 14, 1919; and no further applications 
will be accepted. 

General mechanic (male); range of entrance salaries has been changed from $720 to $900 to $720 to 
$1,000. 



*Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 



Local Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations for The Panama Canal Service will be held at Balboa 
Heights, C. Z., on the dates set opposite the titles thereof: 

Clerk, December 21, 1919. 

Postal clerk, December 14, 1919. 

Stenographer and typist, December 14, 1919. 

The usual entrance salaries are: Cleric, $106 a month; postal clerk. S100 to $125 a month: stenogra- 
pher and typist, $137 for males and $116 for females. 

Full information in regard to the scope and the character of the examinations is contained in pam- 
phlet, form 1424, "Information for Applicants for Stenographer and Typewriter Examination", a 
copy of which may be obtained from the Secretary, Board of Civil Service Examiners, Adminis- 
tration Building, Balboa Heights, C Z. Applicants for the clerk examination must take at least 
one ODtional subiect in addition to the regular basis subjects. The optional subjects are: First, 
typewriting; second, bookkeeping; third, general business training and experience; fourth, time- 
keeping training and experience. If the third optional is taken, three letters of recommendation 
from former employers should accompany the application. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



161 



Applicants for the examination for postal clerk must show that they have had at least one year's 
experience as clerk in the United States or Canal Zone post offices or as postmaster or as Navy mail 
clerk, and they are familiar with the receipt, distribution, and dispatch of mail matter, the issuance 
of money orders, registration of mail and the preparation of various reports required of postmasters. 

Application form No. 1312 must be filled out, including the medical certificate but excluding the 
county officer's certificate, and should be filed promptly with tne Board of Civil Examiners at Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. 

Applicants must have reached their twentieth but not their forty-fifth birthday on the date of the 
examination, must be citizens of the United States, physically sound and in good health. 

Applicants must submit to the examiner on the day of the examination their photographs taken 
within two years, securely pasted in the place provided on the admission cards sent them after their 
applications are filed. 

Applicants for the clerk examination in answer to Question No. 1 and on the outside of the form 
should state the optional subject taken in addition to the name of the examination required. 

In answer to question No. 4, applicant must show residence in some Stale or territory of the United 
Stales from the time of taking up residence therein to December, 1919, on account of temporary em- 
ployment on the Canal Zone and their retention of legal residence in the United States. The same 
must be shown as to the county. 

This examination is scheduled on the dates shown especially to provide for the examination of 
soldiers, sailors, marines, field clerks, and enlisted Army and Navy nurses who were unable to com- 
pete after April 6, 1917, and who are allowed 60 days from August 1, 1919, to do so, if they have been 
discharged prior to that date. Those discharged later will be allowed 60 days after discharge to 
compete; but, owing to our distance from the United States and the delay in receiving questions, all 
such persons should compete if possible on the date above mentioned. 

These examinations will also be open to any other applicants desiring to be examined for the Panama 
Canal Service. 

In addition to the examinations listed above, examinations for Stenographer, Typist and Sten- 
ographer-Typist in the Departmental Service in Washington, or elsewhere, will be held at Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. on December 7, 1919. These examinations are substantially the same as those for 
like positions with the Panama Canal Service, except that the minimum age limit is lower, namely 
18 years. The entrance salary for typist is usually SI, 100 and that for stenographer $1,200, in the 
United States, but for employment in civilian positions with the U. S. Army on the Isthmus, the 
same salaries may be paid as in the Panama Canal Service. 



Partial Eclipse of Sun on November 22. 

An annular eclipse of the sun on November 22, 1919, visible on the 
Isthmus, is announced by the Nautical Almanac, published by the 
United States Naval Observatory. The charts indicate that it will 
be visible on the Isthmus between 6 and 8 o'clock in the morning. 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of death. 


Abraham Casio (Cas- 












sis) 


53216 


Jamaica 


Colon 




September^, 1919. 


Raphael Lopez 


179801 


Colombia 


Colon 


R. * F. Agent 


September 18, 1919. 


Juan B. Segura 


46075 


Panama 


Gatun 


Mun. Eng. Div. 


September 11, 1919. 


Uriah Allen 


182673 


Jamaica 


Camp Bierd 


R. A F. Agent. 


September 27.1919. 


Edward Stokes 


51859 


Jamaica 




R.&F. Agent 


September 30, 1919. 


Charles Rose 


2405 


American 


Balboa... 




Scptcmber5, 1919. 


Gerard (Gerald) Des- 












point 


26925 


St. Lucia 


Colon 


Building Division. . 


October 16, 1919. 


Fred Fray 


28 140 










James Jordan 


25600 


Barbados 


Panama 


Mechanical Div . 


October 14. 1919. 


Arthur Lvnch 


37012 


Colombia 


Gamboa 


Cattle Industry 


October 11, 1919. 


Rubin Mannin 


24546 


Trinidad 


Colon 


Marine Division 


October 13, 1919. 


David Richards 


30972 


Jamaica 


Colon 




October 14. [919. 




22354 


Jamaica. 


Panama 




October 20, 1919. 


Robert Clarke 


76388 


Barbados 


Colon 


R. & F. Agent 


September 7, 1919. 


Cruz Mercado 


40806 




Camp Bierd 


R.&F. Agent 


October 3, 1919. 



Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is. "The Panama Canal. Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," 
Canal, Washington, D. C." 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal 
United States, "Pancanal. Washington." 

Mail for ships passing through the Canal or touching at either of the terminal ports should be 
addressed to "Cristobal. Canal Zone." 



or "The Panama 
Panama;" in the 



162 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Official Circulars. 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 27, 1919. 
Circular No. 218: 

Effective October 22. 1919, Mr. S. W. Heald 
is designated an accountable official of the Pan- 
ama Railroad and Panama Canal, vire Mr. W. F. 
Foster, and as such will account for all non- 
expendable property in use by the Panama Rail- 
road and Panama Canal rolling stock. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 
Approved : I 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Employees Returning on Transport. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. October 30, 1919. 
To all concerned — Advice has been received by 
cable that employees whose leave expired up to 
and including October 25, and who were booked 
to sail on steamers A llianca and Colon, have been 
transferred to transport Princess Mateika, sailing 
from New York November 1. 

The message states that families not traveling 
with employees returning from leave could not 
be accommodated on the transport. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Rates of Pay and Commutation of Subsist- 
ence for Employees of Corozal Hospital. 

The Fanama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 29, 1919. 
To all concerned— -The Governor has approved 
an additional monthly rate of $31.50 for foremen, 
messengers, dairy men, clerks, etc., employees 
of Corozal Hospital. 

This rate will be considered as amending para- 
graph 23 of Circular No. 625-6 dated October 24, 
1918; making the scnedule for monthly men as 
given therein, as follows: 

$16.50, S21.50, $24.00. $26. 5®, $27.50, $29.00, 
$31.51, $36.50, and $41.50. The last rate is for 
clerks only. 



Approved : 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor. 



C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Tug "De Lesseps." 

The Panama Canal, 

Supply Departmext, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 31, 1919. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

The Dredging Division advises that as far as 
they are concerned, the tug De Lesseps can be 
released for sale. Before efforts are made toward 
disposing of this tug by sale to private concerns, 
it is desired to ascertain definitely whether or 
not the same can be used by any of the depart- 
ments or divisions of The Panama Canal. 

This tug is tied up at Gamboa and a brief de- 
scription of her is as follows: She is rated as a 



second-class, iron hull, single-screw towboat; 
length 67' 6", beam 15', depth 9'; tonnage, 75. 
Oil is used as fuel and she has a capacity of 65 
barrels; equipped with a generator for electric 
lights; built in France in 1885; boiler in O. K. 
condition and has a working pressure of 1 10 
pounds; machinery in good condition and hull in 
fair condition. 

Will you please advise as soon as possible 
whether or not you are interested in this tug? 
R. K. Morris, 
Chief Quartermaster. 



Cable Notice. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 27, 1919. 
Circular No. 1413: 

Agents and operators — The following informa- 
tion received from the Central and South Amer- 
ican Telegraph and Cable Company: 

"Naval Communication service advise ef- 
fective October 20, 1919. will accept at Guan- 
tanamo messages for following points in Re- 
public of Hayti: Anseaveay, Aquin, Caphai- 
tien, Cayes Fortliberte, Conaivos, Jacmel 
Jeremie Miragmanf, Petit Geave, Port de 
Paix, St. Marc. Port au Prince, charge be- 
yond Guantanamo for this traffic is 25 cents 
per word. Effective same date messages 
will be accepted for all points in Dominican 
Republic, charges beyond Guantanamo being 
22 cents per word." 



"Western Union advise urgent messages 
may now be accepted at triple rate beyond 
London for Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Ice- 
land, and Faroe Islands." 

W. J. Bissell, 
Acting Master of Transportation. 



Labor Train Changes, Atlantic End. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation. 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 38, 1919. 
Circular No. 1415: 

To all concerned — Effective Saturday, Novem- 
ber 1, the Coco Solo-Fort Randolph labor train 
will be discontinued. 

Effective same date, evening Gatun labor train 
will discontinue running down to Broadway and 
will go to 3d street, using same route and mak- 
ing same stops formerly made by the Cico Solo- 
Fort Randolph labor train. 

W. J. Bissell, 
Acting Master of Transportation. 



Sale of Glass Carboys. 

Sealed bids will be received in the office of the 
Chief Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, Bal- 
boa Heights, C. Z., up to 10 a. m., December 1, 
1919, and then opened, for the purchase of 140 
five-gallon and 33 ten-gallon glass carboys. Bids 
will be considered on all or any number of these 
carboys. Bids must be accompanied by post 
office money order or certified check in an amount 
not less than 10 per cent of the amount bid. 
Carboys will be shown to prospective purchasers, 
by the General Storekeeper at Balboa, any week- 
day between the hours of 8 a. m. and 11 a. m. 
and 12 noon and 4 p. m. The Panama Canal 
reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 



COMMISSARY NOTE. 



Bocks. 

Books received: 

"Tarzan and the Jewels of Ooar," by Edgar Rice Burroughs; "The Haunted Bookshop," by Chris- 
topher Morley; "My Lady Nicotine," "Tommy and Grizel," "The Little White Bird," "When A 
Man's Single." "A Window in Thrums," "Sentimental Tommy," "Peter and Wendy," "The Little 
Minister," "Half Hours," "Auld Licht Idyls," all by J. M. Barrie. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 12, 1919. No. 13. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending November 8, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Middlebury 

Chautau'jua 

Imperial 

Salvador 

Laura C.Hall.... 

Ulysses 

Perou 

Oranie Nassau. . . 

Heredia 

Balboa 

Santa Leonora 

Ucayali 

Jamaica 

Botsford 

Peru 

Palena 

Manavi 

Middlebury 

Santa Marta 

Siam ... 

Princess Matoika. 



Line or charterer. 



Panama Railroad Commissary 

United States Shipping Board 

South American Steamship Line... 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Metals Corporation 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 

French Line 

Royal Dutch W. I. Mail Co 

United Fruit Company 

Colombian Maritime Co 

United States Government 

Peruvian Steam-hip Line 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United States Shipping Board 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

South American S eanvhip Line.. . 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Panama Railroad Commissary 

United Fruit Company 

Vanish East Asiatic Steam-ship Co. 
United St^tc« Government 



Arrived. 



November 3. 
November 3. . 



November 3... 



November 3... 
November 4... 
November 4... 
November 5.... 
November 5... 
November 7..., 
November 7.... 
November 8... 
November S... 



Departed. 



November 2.. 
November 3. 
November 3 . 
November 3. 
November 4 . 
November 4.. 
November 5. 
November 5. 
November 6. 
November 7.. 
November 7.. 
November 8.. 
November 8.. 



November 8... 



November 8... 
November 7... 
November 8.., 



Cargo — 



Discharged Laded 



Tons. 



217 
t!50 



661 



603 
2,700 
2,039 
1,453 

765 
450 

(*) 
10 

1.735 



Tons. 
tlO 
(5) 
440 
640 
C) 
(X) 
54 
454 
26 
(t) 
80 
183 
690J 



266 J 



(t) 
(t) 



* No cargo discharged. 



t Pounds. 



J No cargo laded. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending November 8, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged, Laded. 


Laura C.Hall 


Paeific Metals Corporation 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United States Shipping Board 
Toyo Risen Kaisha 

Peruvian Steamship Line 


November 4.... 
November 4.... 
November 5.... 
November 5.... 
November 8.... 
November 8.... 




Tons. 


Tons. 
75 


Peru 

Sierra 


November 8.... 
November 8.... 


58 
3,473 
1,015 


7 




26 




25 


Ucavali 






54 



New Ccalir.g Record Established. 

Coaling at the Canal plant at Cristobal on November 10, steamship 
Port Milburn received 904f tons coal in 2 hours and 5 minutes. This 
is a record at the plant for this quantity of coal. 



Refunds of Tolls. 

Tolls were refunded October 31, 1919, by The Panama Canal 
overcharges against ships passing through the Canal, as follows: 



f(,r 



'Name of ship. 


Date of transit. 


Original 

tolls 
charged. 


Corrected 

charge. 


Amount 
refunded. 


Payment made to — 




April 13, 1915 

Mav29. 1015 .. 

May 1, 1915 

Mav20, 1915 

September 11, 1915.. 
November 9, 1918... 


$1,677.60 

1,642.50 

980.00 

930.00 

3,866.25 

2,279.52 


$1,547.50 

1,547.50 

860.00 

860.00 

3,253 75 

1,257.50 


$130.10 

95.00 

120 00 

70.00 

612.50 

1,022.02 


W. R. Grace & Co. 




W. R. Grace & Co 




W. R. Grace & Co. 




W. R. Grace & Co. 




Payne <fe Wardlaw. 












$9,326 25 


$2,019 62 





164 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Surges and Currents in the Cut. 

Studies of the currents and surges set up in Gaillard Cut and parts 
of Gatun Lake adjacent to the north end of the Cut by drawing water 
from the Cut to fill the chambers at Pedro Miguel Lock, have been 
made by the Section of Hydrography and Meteorology. With respect 
to the effect on navigation it has been determined that : 

The currents that accompany these surges are generally too feeble seriously to 
hinder navigation. The currents toward Pedro Miguel are much stronger than the 
return currents toward Gamboa. Only the former need be considered as constituting 
a possible danger to navigation. Vessels are required to navigate the Gaillard Cut 
section of the Canal at slow speed (not over 6 knots). With the precautionary meas- 
ures that are taken and moderate currents experienced, no serious accidents to 
navigation have occurred in Gaillard Cut, and but few minor accidents. 

In the case of a restriction of a cross-section, as for instance by a wrecked hull or a 
slide, the current and wave effects would assume values that would make rapid filling 
of Pedro Miguel Lock unsafe for navigation in the Cut. That is, either no water should 
be drawn during the passage of ships in the Cut, or the culvert valves should be only 
partly opened so as to draw water slowly. 

These surges have a maximum range in height from trough to crest of nearly three 
feet, i. e., the highest crest levels are nearly 1.5 feet above mean lake level and the 
lowest troughs are about the same distance below the average level of the lake. 
These changes in the surface level of the lake due to surges may affect navigation 
when the lake is down to its minimum operating level by reducing the navigable 
depth of water in the Canal approximately 1.5 feet at the trough phase of the surge. 
When the lake stands at or near its maximum operating level there would be a tend- 
ency for the water to spill over the lock gates into the lock chambers and machinery 
pits at the crest phase of the surge. This tendency is not important as the gates and 
masonry walls at the upper end of Pedro Miguel Locks were built higher than the 
maximum operating level to prevent spilling over. 

DESCRIPTION OF SURGES. 

The surges have been recorded on hydrographs at Pedro Miguel, 
adjoining the upper entrance to the east chamber; at Gamboa, at the 
opposite end of the Cut; at Juan Mina, 4| miles up the valley of the 
Chagres, at approximately right angles to the axis of the Cut; and at 
Gatuncillo, 3 miles beyond Juan Mina, and near the head of backwater 
on the river. They have also been noticed as far as 6 miles beyond 
Gamboa, along the axis of the Canal. In a series of observations 
it was found that the surge traveled from Gamboa up the Chagres 
River arm of the lake in opposition to an inflow of water approximating 
1,260 c. f. s. A considerable freshet, however, on the river will wipe 
out the surges on the Chagres arm of Gatun Lake. 

The Cut, ending in Pedro Miguel Lock, is 6.97 nautical miles, or 
slightly over 8 statute miles, in length. The immersed portion of the 
Cut prism is theoretically 300 feet wide by 45 feet deep at lake eleva- 
tion 85 feet, a cross-sectional area of 14,500 square feet. Due to re- 
moval of slides there are many places which have a greater cross- 
sectional area than this. To cut down current velocity in the neigh- 
borhood of the lock the Canal was excavated 600 feet wide, tapering 
to 300 feet at a point 4,300 feet from the lock. 

A filling of a complete chamber with Lakes Miraflores and Gatun, at 
elevations of 54 feet and 85 feet, respectively, requires about 3,800,000 
cubic feet of water in a lockage. The wall culverts have minimum 
clear openings of 255 square feet. If both a side and center wall culvert 
are opened a lock chamber is filled in 1\ minutes. If a side culvert only 
is used, 13| minutes are necessary. Thus there are about 8,440 and 
4,690 c. f. s. t respectively, being drawn, according to whether 2 or 1 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 165 

culvert is drawing water. If both chambers are receiving water simul- 
taneously, with all 3 culverts cpen, there are 1\ minutes in which 
water will be drawn at the rate of 13,130 c. f. s. This is the maximum 
case; and while such operation does not often occur, it would theoreti- 
cally give a uniform velocity of about 1 f. s. or nearly 0.6 knot an 
hour in the Cut during a draft of water. This flow is not uniform. 

Surges jrom lockages — -When the valves are opened the Canal basin 
above the locks rapidly falls in elevation (sometimes as much as 1.5 
feet, according to the number of valves open). The inertia of rest 
of the Canal water plus the friction from the sides and bottom of the 
Canal, prevents an immediate response to the tendency for a flow of ' 
water to set up toward the lock. 

When the valves are closed and the effect of the difference in eleva- 
tions overcomes the tendency for a retardation of flow in the Cut, 
an acceleration sets up, which results in a surge or over-travel, the 
crest of which is as much above the original lake level as the depression 
was below. Equalization of levels is finally reached after a series of 
wave amplitudes, with decreasing intensities, unless their movement 
is complicated by another lockage. 

A study of the hydrographs shows that from crest to trough the 
oscillations at all stations are about 45 minutes apart. Examination 
of many such hydrographs have shown this definite period occurs 
daily. During the six lockages of August 3, 1919, the average period 
of time between the same phase of the surges at each station was as 
follows : 

(a) Effect of opening valves at Pedro Miguel Lock appears on the Gamboa hydro- 
graph in 18 minutes; at Juan Mina, in 60 minutes; at Gatuncillo in 78 minutes. 

(b) The effect of closing valves at Pedro Miguel Lock appears at Gamboa in 19 
minutes; at Juan Mina, 60 minutes; at Gatuncillo, 82 minutes. 

(c) The peak of the return surge after the closing of the valves is observed at Gam- 
boa 25 minutes after it appeared at Pedro Miguel; at Juan Mina in 65 minutes: 
and 87 minutes afterward at Gatuncillo. 

When the crest phase of a wave is at Pedro Miguel a trough phase 
is approximately at Juan Mina, and vice versa. The relative heights 
of successive waves at the various stations vary somewhat, but the 
wave at Gamboa averages about f the height of the wave at Pedro 
Miguel. Wave heights at Juan Mina are about the same as those at 
Gamboa, while at Gatuncillo at the head of the Chagres River arm 
of Gatun Lake, the wave heights are approximately 50 per cent greater 
than at Gamboa or Juan Mina. 



Scope of Investigations of Marine Accidents by Board of Local Inspectors. 

The Board of Local Inspectors of The Panama Canal, at a meeting 
on October 29, adopted the following definitive ruling with respect to 
the investigation of accidents: 

The Board of Local Inspectors shall investigate: 

1. All accidents resulting in loss of life or equipment. 

2. All accidents in which Canal craft and the craft or property of private or com- 
mercial interests are involved. 

3. All accidents in which the craft or property of more than one Panama Canal 
department (or Panama Railroad) is involved. 

4. All other accidents which in the opinion of the division head are serious enough 
to justify action by the Board. 

Where disciplinary action to a licensed officer is decided upon as the result of an 
independent investigation by a division head, the same shall be passed upon by the 
Board of Local Inspectors where the action recommended will result in the institution 
of official act ion toward the suspension or revocation of an officer's license. 



166 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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IHK PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



167 



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168 -THE 'PANAMA -CANAL RECORD 

Local Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations for The Panama Canal Service will be held at Balboa 
Heights, C. Z., on the dates set opposite the titles thereof: 

Clerk, December 21, 1919. 

Postal clerk, December 14, 1919. 

Stenographer and typist, December 14, 1919. 

The usual entrance salaries are: Clerk, $106 a month; postal clerk, $100 to $125 a month: stenogra 
pher and typist, $13 7 for males and $116 for females. 

Full information in regard to the scope and the character of the examinations is contained in pam 
phlet, form 1424, "Information for Applicants for Stenographer and Typewriter Examination", a 
copy of which may be obtained from the Secretary, Board of Civil Service Examiners, Adminis- 
tration Building, Balboa Heights, C. Z. Applicants for the clerk examination must take at least 
one optional subiect in addition to the regular basis subjects. The optional subjects are: First 
typewriting; second, bookkeeping; third, general business training and experience; fourth, time- 
keeping training and experience. If the third optional is taken, three letters of recommendation 
from former employers should accompany the application 

Applicants loi the examination lor postal clerk must show that they have had at least one year's 
experience as clerk in the United States or Canal Zone post offices or as postmaster or as Navy mail 
clerk, and they are familiar with the receipt, distribution, and dispatch of mail matter, the issuance 
of money orders, registration of mail and the preparation of various reports required of postmasters. 

Application form No. 1312 must be filled out, including the medical certificate but excluding the 
county officer's certificate, and should be filed promptly with tne Board of Civil Examiners at Balboa 

Heights, C. Z. ..,,.,.,,., j ..,_ j '*. * !•_ 

applicants must have reached their twentieth but not their forty-fifth birthday on the date ot the 
examination, must be citizens of the United States, physically sound and in good health. 

Applicants must submit to the examiner on the day of the examination their photographs taken 
within two years, securely pasted in the place provided on the admission cards sent them after their 
applications are filed. . , 

Applicants for the clerk examination in answer to question No. 1 and on the outside ot the lorrr 
should state the optional subject taken in addition to the name of the examination required. 

In answer to question No. 4, applicant must show residence in some Stale or territory of the United 
States from the time of taking up residence therein to December, 1919, on account of temporary em- 
' ployment on the Canal Zone and their retention of legal residence in the United States. The same 
must be shown as to the county. 

This examination is scheduled on the dates shown especially to provide for the examination ol 
soldiers, sailors, marines, field clerks, and enlisted Army and Navy nurses who were unable to com 
pete after April 6, 1917, and who are allowed 60 days from August 1, 1919, to do so, if they have been 
discharged prior to that date. Those discharged later will be allowed 60 days after discharge to 
compete; but, owing to our distance from the United States and the delay in receiving questions, all 
such persons should compete if possible on the date above mentioned. 

These examinations will also be open to any other applicants desiring to be examined for the Panama 

In addition to the examinations listed above, examinations for Stenographer, Typist and Stem 
o»rapher-Typist in the Departmental Service in Washington, or elsewhere, will be held at Balboa 
Heights C. Z. on December 7, 1919. These examinations are substantially the same as those fo» 
like positions with the Panama Canal Service, except that the minimum age limit is lower, nameb 
18 years. The entrance salary for typist is usually $1,100 and that for stenographer $1,200, in the 
United States, but for employment in civilian positions with the U. S. Army on the Isthmus. tn» 
same salaries may be paid as in the Panama Canal Service. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted al Canal 
post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights (telephone 286). Age limits do not apply to persons entitled to preference 
because of military or naval service: 

Accountant (male and female) ; Grade 2, S3.600 to $4,500 a year, and Grade 1 , $3,000 to $3,600 a year; 
No. 532; form 1312; age. no limit 5 :. t 

Transitman (male); S900 to SI, 200 a vear; No. 525; form 1312; ase.at least 20 years.t 

Veterinarian (male) ; SI, 500 to $1,620 a year; No. 514; form 1312; December 14, 1919; age, at least 
21 years but not 45 years. - , „ , • 

Lay inspector (male); Grade 1, $1,080 a year; No. 514; December 14, 1919; form 304; age, at 

Superintendent of" transportation (Ordnance Department at Large) (male); $1,800 to S2.400 a year; 
No. 518; form 1312; age at least 25 years; November 25, 1919.* ,,;*«,„« a- tvt 

Assistant engineer (furnace design); armor, guns, and projectile plant (male); Sll-20 per diem; l\o. 
520; November 25, 1919; lorn 1312; age. under 45 years.* 

Assistant special agent, social hygiene (female); $600 to $1,500 a year; No. 529; December 9, 
1919; form 1312; age. at least 21 years.* . . « T .. „■> ta u 

Physical laboratory helper (male); $600 to $900 a year; No. 64-amended; November 23, December 
14. 1919, and Januarv 11, 1920; form 1320; age, at least 16 years. 

Apprentice fish culturist (male); S600 to S960a year; No. 61-amended; r- ovember 23, December 14, 
1919,'and January 11. 1920; form 1312; age. at least 18 years but under 45 years. 

Mechanician qualified as mechanical store and tool room keeper (male); $/20 to M.uuu a year; ao, 
515; November 23, 1919; form 304; age. at least 18 years. 

Senior structural engineer. Grade 1 (male) ; $3,000 to $4,000 a year; No. 504; form 1312; age, under 

Senior'structural engineer, Grade 2 (male) ; SI, 800 to $2,700 a year; No. 504; form 1312; age, under 

Senior mechanical engineer. Grade 2 (male); $1,S00 to $2,700 a year; No. 504; form 1312; age. 
under 60 years, t 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 169 

Superintendent of gas works (male) ; $1,500 a year; No. S33; December 9, 1919; form 1312; age. 
at least 25 years.* 

Cotton classer's helper (male); S900 to $1,440 a year; No. 524; December 14, 1919; form 1312; age. 
at least 16 years but not 25 years. 

Histo-pathologic technician (male); SI, 200 to $1,500 a year; No. 528; December 2, 1919; form 2118; 
age, at least 21 years but not 45 years or over.* 

Assistant instructor. Motor Transport Training School (male); $1,800 to $2,400 a year; No. 359- 
amended; form 21 18. f The following come under the above-mentioned title: Assistant instructor for 
automobile machinists, assistant instructor for automobile mechanics, assistant instructor in ignition 
and carburetion, assistant instructor in battery repair and rebuilding, assistant instructor for chauffeurs, 
assistant instructor in welding, assistant instructor in tire repairing and wheel building, assistant instruc- 
tor in blacksmithing and spring making, assistant instructor in sheet-metal working and radiator repair- 
ing, assistant instructor in carpentry and woodworking, assistant instructor in painting, assistant in- 
structor in warehousing spare parts and issue, assistant instructor in engineering drawing, assistant 
instructor in applied structural engineering. 

Assistant observer, Weather Bureau (male); $1,080 a year; No. 361-amended; December 14, 1919; 
form 304; age, at least 18 years but under 35 years. 

Fire chief, Ordnance Department at Large (male); $1,800 a year; No. 519; November 25, 1919; 
form 1800; age, at least 25 years but under 50 years.* 

Assistant for fishery food laboratory (male); $2,000 to $2,400 a year; December 23, 1919; age.no 
limits.* 

Clinical clerk (male); $900 to $1,200 a year; No. 542; December 14, 1919; form 1312; age, at least 
20 years but under 40 years. 

Mineral geographic aid (male and female); $1,200 to ? 1,4 10 a vear; and mineral geographer (male 
and female); $1,500 to S2, 400 a year; No. 543; December 14 and 15, 1919; form 1312; age, at least 
20 years but under 45 years. 

Clerk qualified as pharmacist (male and female); $75 to $125 a month; No. 545; December 14, 
1919; form 1312; age. at least 21 years but under 45 years. 

Inspector (mechanical) ; inspector (electrical) ; inspector (mechanical and electrical) (male); Grade 
1. S5.20 to $6.40 per diem; Grade 2, $6.80 to SS.fcO per diem; No. 546; form 1312; age, at least 21 
years; December 16, 1919.* 

Master machinist, armor piercing projectiles; master machinist, guns up to 6-inch; master machinist, 
guns above 6-inch (male); S12. 40 per diem; No. 536; form 1371; age, no limits.* 

Mechanical assistant in refrigeration (male); SI, 200 to Sl,400ayear; No. 534; December 9, 1919 
form 1312; age. at least 21 years but not 35 years.* 

Structural steel draftsman and designer (male) ; $2,400 a year; No. 539; December 9, 1919; form 
1312; age. at least 26 years but under 45 years.* 

lore-man open hearth and electric furnace department (male); $10 to $12.56 per diem; No. 535; 
form 1371; age, no limits; December9.* 

Special assistant, legal unit fmale); Grade 1, $1,800 to $2,250 a vear; Grade 2, $2,250 to $2,750 a 
year; Grade 3, S2.750 to $3,500 a year; No. 537; December 16, 1919; form 2118; age, at least 25 
years but under -15 years.* 

The papers of applicants that are received in complete form prior to the hour of closing business on 
November 25, 1919. will be rated immediately, and eligibles resulting therefrom will be certified for 
filling vacancies existing at that time. Papers of applicants th'at are received in complete form after 
November 25, but prior to the hour of closing business on December 16, 1919, will be rated after Decem- 
ber 16, and eligibles will be certified for any remaining or future vacancies. 

Local and assistant inspector of boilers (male) ; $2,100 to $2,950; range of salary has been changed 
from S2.100 to $2,500. 

local and assistant inspector of hulls (male); $2,100 to $2,950; range of salary has been changed 
from S2.100 to $2,500. 

Blue printer (male and female); the United States Civil Service Commission calls attention to the 
above continuous nonassembled examination. There are vacancies at $3.20 per diem and $770 a year. 



♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business on 
that date. 

tNonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice 






Thanksgiving at Tabcga. 

The Hotel Aspinwall is making preparations for the entertainment 
of a large crowd on Thanksgiving Day and the night preceding. An 
old-home dinner, featuring turkey, cranberry sauce, and pumpkin pie, 
will fc>2 served at noon on Thanksgiving Day. There will be no change 
of rates. 

The following are the current rates at the Aspinwall : 

Employees: Dinner, lodging, and breakfast $2 . UU 

Employees per day. . 2.75 

Children under 12 years of age per day. . 1.25 

Servants of employees per day . . 1 . 50 

Employees for stay of 7 days per day . 2 . 00 

Reduction of 10 per cent on above rates for stay of 30 days. Reduction of 
10 per cent for families of four or more for over 7 days' stay. 

Nonemployees per day . 3 . 50 

Children of nonemployees (under 12 years cf age) per day . . 1 . 50 

Servants of nonemployees per day . . 1.75 

Meals: 

Breakfast 1 . 00 

Luncheon 1 . 25 

Dinner 1 . 25 



170 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Las Cascadas to be a Settlement of Silver Employees. 

The village of Las Cascadas and the buildings of the former Army 
post of Camp Otis are to be devoted to a village for silver employees of 
the Canal and Panama Railroad, in connection with which adjacent 
areas of land may be cultivated. A committee has been appointed to 
draw up provisions for policing, sanitation, assignment of quarters, 
use of land, etc. 

Certain of the buildings will be removed for the use of other depart- 
ments of the Canal and of the Army. These include the old engine 
shed, one third of which will be used in connection with the pastures, 
and two-thirds moved to Pedro Miguel foraplayshed ; the police station, 
to be moved to Gamboa; 10 type 7 one-family quarters, to be held for 
further disposition; 9 type-15 cottages, to be moved to Pedro Miguel; 
and 3 type- 18 bachelor quarters, to be moved to Balboa. 



Weather Conditions in October, 1919. 

The monthly rainfall was above normal at 12 stations and below at 8 stations, the 
deficiency occurring mainly over the upper Chagres valley. Totals ranged from 10.21 
inches at the Culebra station on the Pequeni River, to 23.22 i iches at Catun River. 
The greatest rainfall on any one day was 4.04 inches, at Juan Mina on the 10th. 

1 he estimated rainfall over Gatun lake watershed was 14.79 inches, compared with 
a 9-year mean of 15.43 inches, and over the Chagres River basin above Alhajuela it 
was 13.92 inches, compared with an 18-year mean of 14.57 inches. 

The air temperature, daytime cloudiness, and temperature of the sea water were 
generally abo\e normal, while the atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, and 
evaporation were generally below normal. The wind movement was slightly above 
normal everywhere except on the Pacific Coast. 

Numerous fogs occurred at interior stations, most of which were light and had 
lifted or were dissipated by 8 a. m. 

A light earthquake shock was felt on the 9th and slight tremors were recorded on 
the 26th. 

Catun Lake hydrology. — Mean elevation of Gatun Lake was 86.03 feet above sea- 
level; maximum, 86.40 feet, on the 25th, minimum, 85.47 feet on the 1st; evaporation 
from Gatun Lake surface, 3.726 inches; rainfall on Gatun I ake drainage basin, 14.79 
inches; total yield of Gatun Lake watershed, 9.20 inches on watershed; the total 
vield amounted to 62 per cent of the rainfall. 

The following table gives a summary of the weather conditions for the month: 





-o 


Temperature. 


O 


Precipitation. 


Wind. 




















o -J 






_o . 






Stations. 


j£ o a 


3 

i 


a 
a 


Q 


a 
a 








S 

a 

o 


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c 6 
c to 


Q.S 


It 

fi 


a 
M S 


H 

■H.& 

OS — 


a 
.2 

a 


aj 

"5 
Q 


Balboa 


























Heights . . 


29.83079.7 


90 


Oct. 21 


70 


Oct. 


fi 


87.1 


12.11 


10.33 22 


4,516 


N.W. 


31 


s. 


Oct. 24 


Colon 


29.82680.1 


90 


Oct. 29 


71 


Oc}. 


4 


84 4 


21.94 


15.03 26 


5,822 


B.E. 


30 


w. 


Oct. 22 




i79.2 90 


Oct. 16* 


69 


Oct. 


6 




11.72 


12.76 27 


3,036 


N.K 


20 


N. E. 


Oct. 12 


Gatun 


80.0 90 


Oct. 15 


70 Oct. 


■ r ) 




17.46 


16.56 27 


4,563 


N.W. 


25 


1 s. 


Oct. IS 



! And other dates. 



Deceased Employees. 
The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of death. 




23702 

53182 


Barbados 

Haiti 




Panama Railroad 


October 26, 1919. 


Juan Cavallero 


Oam[> Bierd 


November 1, 1919. 



THE PANAMA CANAL, RECORD 



171 



Official Circulars. 



Restrictions on Hunting. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 6, 191V. 
To all concerned — All previous circulars in regard 
to Canal Zone areas in which hunting is prohibited 
are hereby modified to the extent that hunting will 
be permitted with shotguns in all areas with the 
exception of watersheds. The provisions of exist- 
ing circulars still hold good, however, in so far 
as hunting with rifles is concerned. 

Chester Harding, Governor. 



Fence on West Side of Pedro Miguel Lock. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., November 7, 1919. 
To all concerned — The attention of this office has 
been called to the fact that the fence constructed 
on the west side of Pedro Miguel Lock, to keep 
cattle, horses, etc., away from the backfill, has 
been repeatedly cut and portions thereof de- 
stroyed, presumably by equestrians en route across 
the locks. There is a gate in this fence at the lower 
end of the locks, opposite the guard gates, and 
all persons are instructed to use this gate and to 
refrain from attempting to short cut across the 
backfill by cutting the wires of this fence. In- 
fractions of these instructions will result in dis- 
ciplinary action. 

Chester Harding, Governor. 

Office Equipment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 6, 1919. 
To all concerned — The following items of office 
equipment, which are not in stock, are required, 
and it is requested that you advise the Chief, 
Property Bureau, at once if you have any of the 
items listed which are surplus and available for 
transfer. Also please advise if you have any 
other items of office equipment which are surplus. 
Cabinets, filing, vertical, 3 and 4 drawers. 
Cabinets, card index, 5" x 8", 4" x 6", and 3" 

x5". 
Cases, book. 
Chairs, office, arm. 
Chairs, office, revolving. 
Chairs, typewriter. 
Desks, double and single. 
Safes, office, large. 



Safes, office, small. 
Tables, office. 
Tables, typewriter. 



C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Approximate Sailings of Panama Railroad 
Vessels. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 
Balboa Heights. C. Z., November 7, 1919. 
To all concerned — The New York office advises 
that the longshoremen s strike has now been 
terminated, and that the Panama Railroad ships 
will be dispatched as follows: 

Steamship Gen. O. H. Ernst, November 8. 
Steamship Allianca, November 10. 
Steamship Colon. November 13. 
Steamship Ancon, November 19 (with cement) 
Steamship Gen. \V. C. Gorgas, November 20. 
If the passenger ships mentioned will sail as 
above indicated, the following will be the approxi- 
mate sailings from the Isthmus: 

Steamship Allianca. Saturday. November 22. 
Steamship Colon. Thursday, November 27. 
Steamship Gen. W. C. Gorgas, Thursday, De- 
cember 4. 
Steamship Ancon, Sunday, December 7. 
We shall advise later if there is any change in 
the sailing dates mentioned. 

&. W. Heajld, Superintendent. 



Prices ol Scrap. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 1, 1919 
rtEADs of Departments and Divisions: 

Effective November 15, 1919, the following 
prices will be allowed by the Supply Department 
for scrap turned in by the various departments 
and divisions of The Panama Canal. There are 
also shown the selling prices to departments and 
divisions, employees, individuals, and companies: 







Selling 


prices. 




Credit to 






Kind oi scrap. 


be allowed 
divisions. 


To Depts. 
of Panama 


To em- 
ployees and 






Canal. 


I. & C* 




Net ton. 


Net ton. 


Net ton. 


Oar wheels 


$7.00 


$7.50 


(t) 




7.00 


7.50 


$30.00 


Mixed scrap and 




wrought irou and 










5.00 
7.00 


7.50 
7.50 


20.00 


Rail, scrap. 


30.00 


Rail, relaying 


20.00 


20.00 


it) 




Cwt. 


Cwt. 


Cwt. 


Bronze, screening.. 


JS.00 


89 00 


$20.00 


Copper, mixed. . . . 


10.00 


11 00 


25.00 


Brass, mixed 


9.00 


10.00 


15.00 


Brass borings and 








turnings 


7.00 


9.00 


15.00 


L«ad 


3.00 
3.00 
2.00 


4.00 
4.00 
3.00 


6.00 




6.00 




6.00 




2.00 
2.00 


3. CO 

3.00 


6.00 




5.00 


Rubber 


2.00 


3.00 


6.00 


Rags 


2.00 


3 00 


5.00 



♦Without surcharge. 



tNone to be soM. 

R. K. Morris. 
Chief Quartermaster. 



Misdirected Letters. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 10, 1919. 

The following insufficiently addressed mail has 
been received in the office of the Director of 
Posts, and may be obtained upon request of the 
addressee. Request may be made by telephone, 
calling No. 182, Balboa: 
Backus, Mrs. W. C, Box Haferman, YVm. & Co. 

581 Hilbert, John 

Barnes, Charles Loring Logan, Jon, Box 139 
Bray, Alonzo Mangnall, John N. 

Bryan, Mrs. Sarah Mitchell, Euphemia D., 

Edwards, Marguerite R. Box 463 
Garlow, Mrs. William, Sedeno, Manuel Berro- 

Box G. cal,Boxl38 

Gowan, Mrs. John Sterling, Miss Ada May 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Boots and Shoes Section. 

Women's kid Oxfords, turn sole.pr $7.45 

Women's pat. pumps, mock turn welt, pr. 7.55 
Dry Goods Section. 

Rompers and creepers, children's, ea 1 . 20 

Rompers and creepers, children's, ea 89 

Rompers and creepers, children's, ea 89 

Rompers and creepers, children's, ea 89 

Rompers and creepers, children's, ea 1 .00 

Soap, bath, Peroxide, cake 15 

Stationery: 

Books, memo, black leather, ea 52 

Books, memo, black leather, ea 59 

Cards, birth announcement, box 20 

Cards, birth announcement, box 20 

Cards, birth announcement, box 20 

Cards, birth announcement, box 20 

Cards, birth announcement, box 40 

Cards, birth announcement, box 40 

Cards, birth announcement, ea 01 

Leads, H. B., for Eversharp pencils, tube .20 
Leads. F„ for Eversharp pencils, tube.. .20 



172 uu±. r a:\a.ua <_a;\a.l Kh.^uKL> 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Ladies' Blouses. 

A good selection of georgette and crepe de chine blouses, in white and Mesh color, 
in assorted sizes, at $6.20 and $7.45, will be placed on sale in the commissaries 
next week. They are of good quality material and stylish design. 

Japanese Goods. 

A shipment of Japanese goods consisting of ivory beads; pongee embroidered 
silk*-lined parasols, in various colors and designs; Jap Hauutai silk in white and 
pink; pink and blue silk handbags; handbags in printed cotton; brocade, silk- 
lined, novelty bags; and bags in tapestry effect, has recently been received and 
will be placed on sale next Monday. 

Madeira Linens. 

Tea cloths, ranging in prices from $8.80 to $17.90; night dress cases, from $3.85 
to $5.65; doilies, from 34 cents for the small to $3.10 for the large size; tray cloths 
from $1.70 to $4.70; and Dutchess dresser sets from $5.05 to $8, comprise a ship- 
ment of Madeira hand-embroidered linens in exquisite designs recently received 
by the Commissary Division. These will be placed on sale in the commissaries 
on November 17 and will make most desirable Christmas gifts. 



Handbags. 

To early shoppers in search of desirable gifts for Christmas, the information that 
the Commissary Division has recently received a selection of ladies' handbags 
in a variety of styles and prices, \\i\\ be of interest. Among the many good values 
are bags of velvet, lir.cd with silk ar.d fitted with mirror and change purse, in 
plum, brown, blue, and black, at $7.35; other velvet handbags, at $4.70 and $5.05; 
silk handbags in taupe, blue, brown, and black, with the usual fittings, at 
$3.35, black silk handbags with silver frames, at $3.35; and blue, black, tan, and 
giay handbags in silk with combinations of beads, at $4.35. A small shipment of 
misses' handbags in moire silk at $2.20 and $2.35, were also received. With others 
now on hand, all reasonably priced, the commissaries offer an unusual and fashion- 
able array. The new numbers will go on sale Monday, November 17. 



Fountain Pens. 

A leading brand of fountain pen, which has been in large request in the commis- 
saries, has recently been added to stock. Three types are carried, the regular and 
the self-filler style at $2 each, and safety at $2.40. 



Lace. 

A recent shipment of real linen union laces received from England has been placed 
on sale at Ancon, Balboa, Cristobal, Pedro Miguel, and Gatun commissaries. These 
comprise a wide range of patterns and widths and the prices at which they are offered 
are considerably below to-day's purchase prices. 



Ladies' and Children's Wear Scarcity. 

Children's white lawn dresses and flesh colored and white organdie shirt waists, 
which have been on requisition for some time, are not available, according to ad- 
vices recently received from the commissary purchasing agent, and these items, 
therefore, have been carceled. . 



Scarfs and Ties for Men. 

According to items appearing in recent issues of trade publications, the demand for 
men's silk knitted scarfs has exceeded all previous records and they seem to be meeting 
with great popularity all over the United States. Not only are they favored because 
of the new and attractive color combinations and weaves, but also on account of the 
fact that they possess greater durability than the ordinary silk scarf. 

The Commissary Division has recently added to stock men's silk knit four-in-hand 
ties, in assorted colors, r anging in prices from $1.40 to $2.85 each, which it is believed 
will be equally popular on the Isthmus. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

. The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 19, 1919. No. 14. 

Navassa Island. 

The Hydrographic Office has published the following general 
information about Navassa Island, which lies in the course of vessels 
plying through the Windward Passage on the way to or from the 
Canal (including normally those to or from^Atlantic ports of North 
America north of Savannah): 

Settlement — The phosphate company no longer operates on the island and its entire 
personnel has been removed. The buildings shown on chart near Lulu Bay are stand- 
ing but unoccupied and out of repair. The only residents of the island are the light 
keepers and radio operators who live in the immediate vicinity of the lighthouse. 
A narrow-gauge track extends from Lulu Bay to the lighthouse. Cars are hauled up 
the steep incline by winch and cable operated by gasoline engine. 

Lulu Bay — There are no mooring buoys or wharves. In good weather a small vessel 
can moor bow and stern to the cliffs on each side of the bay, or she may anchor in 
the bay and warp her stern into the cliffs where steel cables for holding on have been 
secured. A steam crane and a hand crane are installed on the cliff landing to hoist 
supplies ashore. 

Communication — There is a United States naval radio statio.i located here. A 
naval \essel from the Guantanamo naval station visits the island about once every 
three months carrying supplies to the light keepers and radio men." 

The characteristics of the light established on Navassa Island were 
published in The Panama Canal Record of December 12, 1917. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port cf Cristobal for Week Ending November 15, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo- 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 










Tons. 


Tons. 

23* 
(tt 

180! 

tl25 

5 

U) 

57 


Ansaldo SanGiorgio II 


National Navigation Society 


November 9 . . 


November 10. 
November 10. 
November 10. 
November 10. 
November 11 . 
November 12. 
November 13. 
November 14. 
November 14. 
November 15. 
November 15. 


7 






November 10. 
November 10. 
November 10. 
November 10. 


93 
684 
864 
t730 






Levisa 

Parismina 


United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 










49 

18 

5 

96 






November 13. 
November 13 
November 13. 


1,346 

400 

803 

1.073 

1,133 




Panama Railroad Commissary. . . . 
Spanish Steamship Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Italian Steamship Co 


P. de Satrustigui 

Acajutla 


November 14. 

November 15. 






Bologna 







* Transport. 



t Pounds. 



t None laded. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending November 15, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargrj — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 


Ansaldo San Giorgio II 
Ansaldo San Giorgio I 




November 10. 
November 13. 
November 14. 


November 10. 

(*) 
November 14 


Tons. 
7 
4 
2 


Tons. 
(t) 
(t) 

(t) 



•In port. 



tNo cargo laded. 



174 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 






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176 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Facilities for Repair of Vessels at the Panama Canal. 

GENERAL. 

The principal manufacturing and repair plant of The Panama Canal 
is located at Balboa, the Pacific terminal of the Canal. It is adjacent 
to an inner harbor, which has an area sufficient to permit access to 
docks, which aggregate 7,500 feet in length, including commercial 
docks, repair wharves, and coaling docks. 

A much smaller plant is located at Cristobal, the Atlantic terminal, 
about one and one-half miles from the main commercial docks. 

THE BALBOA PLANT. 

Dry dock and repair wharves — The dry dock is 1,000 feet long by 110 
feet wide, with a depth of 35 feet over the blocks at mean tide. High 
tide varies from 3 to 1 1 feet above mean tide. The dock is served by a 
50-ton traveling crane with an outside reach of 5 feet beyond the center 
line of the dock. This crane is also capable of traveling along the face 
of some of the repair wharves, thus facilitating the prosecution of re- 
pairs to vessels. At regular intervals along the coping of the dock are 
outlets for air, water, and electric service; either direct current or 
alternating current can be supplied, thus furnishing power for the 
auxiliary motors of ships in dry dock. 

For ships which do not require dry docking, there are adjacent to 
the shops approximately 3,500 feet of repair wharves. 

Repair shops — The repair shops are centrally located with respect to 
the dry dock and repair wharves. Ample track and crane service pro- 
vide for handling work between shops and ships. 

The main metal working shops (machine, smithery, and boiler shop) 
are provided with 60-ton overhead traveling cranes, while the foundry 
has a 25-ton overhead crane. As all the shops are equipped with as 
complete a line of power tools as are generally found in an up-to-date 
repair shop, only the larger tools will be given special mention so as to 
give an idea of the maximum capacity of each department. 

The machine shop is provided with a vertical boring mill capable of 
working 18 feet in diameter, with an open side extension planer 16 
feet by 32 feet, and with a lathe 120-inch swing by 65 feet between 
centers. 

The smithery is provided with a 500-ton forging press with the 
necessary furnaces to handle any work that the press is capable of. 

The boiler and ship fitting shops have a set of rolls capable of bend- 
ing plates f inch by 30 feet 1 inch by 24 feet, or 2 inches by 6 feet. 

The pipe shop is outfitted for plumbing work and for pipe, copper, 
and sheet metal work of the highest classes. 

The foundry is equipped with a 2-ton tropenas converter and one 2- 
ton and one 1-ton cupola, and the usual brass furnaces. It can turn out 
castings as follows: Bronze brass or composition, \ pound to 1,000 
pounds; iron, \ pound to 26,000 pounds; steel, | pound to 10,000 
pounds. 

The planing mill and joiner shop is outfitted with the usual wood- 
working machines, including a sawmill capable of handling timbers 
likely to be used in connection with ship work. 

The oxy-acetylene plant has portable electric-welding and oxy- 
acetylene cutting outfits capable of handling emergency repairs. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 177 

The plant develops approximately 400 cubic feet of acetylene per hour, 
5,000 cubic feet of oxygen per day, and 10,000 cubic feet of hydrogen 
per day. 

The storehouses (under the control of the_ Supply Department) 
carry on hand a large stock of steel shapes, pipe, ship fittings^ and 
supplies of every description. Steel plate is carried in stock in all 
thicknesses up to and including 2 inches. Plates smaller than § -inch 
vary by sixteenths and plates larger than f-inch vary by eighths. 
The largest plates in stock are 72 inches by 10 feet by 2 inches thick. 
A large amount of steel billets is kept on hand in all sizes up to and 
including 24 inches by 24 inches by 19 feet. Structural shapes are 
carried as follows: Eyebeams, all sizes up to 27 inches; channels, all 
sizes up to 15 inches; ship channels, all sizes ud to 12 inches; and 
angles, all sizes up to 8 inches by 8 inches by f-inch. 

Tn addition to the crane service heretofore mentioned, the services 
of two floating cranes with a capacity of 250 tons each are available at 
any time or place in the Canal or terminal harbors. 

CRISTOBAL PLANT. 

This plant has less capacity than the Balboa plant and is intended 
for repairs of less importance. The activities of these shops are confined 
to three buildings, of somewhat temporary construction; one of which 
houses the machine shop, smithery, pipe shop, and power plant; 
another the boiler and shipfitter's shoo; and the third, the wood work- 
ing shop. The tools are of less modern construction and of smaller 
capacity than those in use at the Balboa plant, few steps having been 
taken to modernize the plant pending more definite information as to 
exactly what the demands upon it will be. It is, however, capable 
of undertaking routine repairs to vessels; and, in emergencies, such 
parts as require larger tools than are available here can be shipped to 
Balboa to be machined. 

There is available at this plant a small dry dock, originally con- 
structed by the French and later extended by the Americans. This 
dock is now 300 feet in length, 50 feet in width, and has a depth over the 
blocks o^ 13 feet 6 inches at ordinary mean high tide. Adjacent to the 
shops and dry dock are approximately 2,000 feet of repair wharves. 

WORKING FORCE. COST OF REPAIRS.— DOCKING CHARGES. 

Practically all skilled mechanics on the Isthmus come from the 
United States, the unskilled labor being performed almost exclusively 
by West Indians. About 775 skilled men and 1,427 silver employees 
are employed at Balboa Shops, and about 180 skilled and 460 silver men 
at Cristobal shops. 

The actual cost of repairs, as billed, compares favorably with that 
to be found in the United States. No contracts are made for work 
performed in the Canal shops. The charges are at actual shop costs 
plus a moderate percentage for general administrative expense and 
profit, and the total cost is believed to be less than in Asiatic or South 
American establishments, while in many cases it compares favorably 
with costs in the United States. 

Charges for docking are in accordance with the following rates. 

Balboa. Cristobal 

.Men-of-war. Per displacement ton for docking and undocking $0. 25 $0. 15 

For each lay day -15 .11 

Army and Navy transports, colliers, hospital ships, and supply ships, per gros6 ton, 
Panama Canal measurement: 

For dockine and undocking/ .25 .15 

For each lay day -15 . tp 



178 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Merchant Steamers. Per gross ton, Panama Canal measurement: Balboa. Cristobal. 

For docking and undocking SO. 25 $0. IS 

For each lay day .15 .10 

Merchant sailing vessels. Per net ton, Panama Canal measurement: 

For docking and undocking .25 .15 

For each lay day .15 • .10 

Minimum charge, when dock is pumped for exclusive benefit of one vessel and occu- 
pied by a single vessel: 

For docking and undocking 200.00 75.00 

For lay days 120.00 45.00 

Note — When a vessel whose tonnage is below the amount which at regular rates would eoual 
the minimum rate above is docked at Cristobal witn one or more other vessels, she will be charged $60 
for docking and undocking and $30 for each lay day. When'a vessel under the same conditions is docked 
at Balboa with one or more other vessels, or under other circumstances which involve no additional 
cost for pumping, a special rate will be charged dependent on circumstances but in no case less than the 
actual cost, exclusive of pumping, plus 10 per cent. 

WORK PERFORMED. 

As indicated by the facilities noted, the shops of the Canal are fitted, 
to perform practically all classes of ship repair and construction, and 
are currently carrying on such work. The largest job perfo r med by 
the shops has been the overhaul of five former German ships, brought 
to the Canal from Peru, whe~e they had deteriorated considerably 
during internment and had suffered extensive damage at the hands of 
their crews. The extent and completion of this job have been noted 
in The Panama Canal Record. The aggregate gross tonnage of these 
ships was 32,831. The next largest job has been the remodelling of the 
steamship Cristobal of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, with 
change from coal to oil burning and extension of passenger accommo- 
dations, as well as the overhaul of hull and machinery. 

During the fiscal year 1919, a coast guard cutter, the Manhattan, 
120 feet 3 inches in length, over all, by 24 feet in molded breadth, 
was completed at Balboa shops, materials and machinery for the 
vessel having been sent from the United States. The Konigin der 
Nederlanden was converted into a troopship. The Santa Isabel was 
repaired after having been on a reef, and extensive changes to the 
propelling machinery were made. The Heina, which had been re- 
covered after being ashore, was given a general overhauling, which 
included the renewal of several bottom plates, straightening ether 
plates, and a thorough cleaning out of the condenser. Old boilers were 
removed and new boilers installed on the steamship Quoque. Three- 
new furnaces were installed in the U. S. S. Yorktown. Extensive 
work was done on the motor schooners Elizabeth Ruth and Evelyn, 
including the gas engines. Fifty 1,800-pound cast steel anchors were 
made for the United States Navy. 

At the Cristobal shops extensive repairs were made to the steam- 
ships Allianca, Balboa, Clairmont, Advance, and Colon and the dredges 
No. 83, and No. 86, in addition to many running repairs made on the 
variety of ships calling at Cristobal. 

Marine work amounted to 54.14 per cent of the work performed by 
Balboa shops during the last fiscal year. Work for the Panama Rail- 
road was 26.56 per cent of the total, manufacturing work 10.50 per 
cent, and sundry work, 8.80 per cent. During the preceding fiscal 
year the percentages were: Marine, 46.12; Panama Railroad, 23.11; 
manufacturing, 16.19; miscellaneous, 14.58. 

Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Caral Zone," or "The Pana.mi 
Canal, Washington, D. C." , 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama; * in thf 
United States, "Pancanal, Washington." 

Mail for ships passing through the C=inftl or touching it either of the terminal ports should be 
addre«ied to "Cristobal, Canal Zone." 



THE PANAMA 'CANAL RECORD 179 

A Little Ship en a Long Voyage. 

The British motor schooner Percival S. Parks, of 100 net tons, 
Panama ("anal measurement, passed through the Canal on October 
20 on the way from New York to Tahiti. The voyage is 6,503 
miles — 1,074 miles from New York to Cristobal, 43 miles through 
the Canal, 4,480 miles from Balboa to Tahiti. The Percival 5. 
Parks is 96 feet in length by 25 feet beam and had a salt water 
•draft of 12 "feet 6 inches at the time of transit. She was carrying 208 
tons of machinery and general cargo and paid tolls of $125. 

This ship saved 4,844 miles by using the Canal, or over two- 
fifths of the 1 1,347 miles from Mew York to Tahiti via Rio de Janeiro, 
Montevideo, and the Strait of Magellan. The voyage by way of 
St. Vincent, the Cape of Good Hope, and Wellington would have 
been 15,744 miles, or by Gibraltar, Suez, Torres Strait, and Levuka 
about 16, 664 miles. 

New Record for Tolls Collections. 

A new high record for monthly collections of tolls on ships passing 
through the Canal was established in October, with the collection of 
$661,307.74. The previous record was $644,499.23, in May, 1918, 
and prior to that the record was $606,316,56, for March, 1915. These 
three months are the only ones in which collections of tolls have ex- 
ceeded $600,000. In October, 1919, the tolls averaged $3,356,89 per 
ship for the 196 ocean-going commercial vessels and 1 launch which 
made the transit. The average of ships per day was 6,35. 

Revision of Telephone Directory. 

The copy for a revised telephone directory, to be issued as of 
December 15, 1919, will go to the printer December 1. All changes 
or corrections in the present directory should be forwarded to the 
Supervisor of Telephones, Balboa Heights, not later than December 1 , 
Proof corrections will be made to December 6. 



Distribution of Victory Loan Notes. 

The Liberty Loan Committee are now engaged in mailing the Vic- 
tory Loan notes where the last payment on subscriptions have been 
completed. 

On account of the recent strike at New York and the consequent 
refusal of insurance companies to assume the risk involved in trans- 
portation, a part of the bonds have been delayed but are expected 
within the next few days. 



Conversion of First and Second Issue Bonds. 

Governor Harding has directed the committee to make some arrange- 
ment whereby employees can send their first and second issue Liberty 
Bonds to Washington for exchange or conversion. The last coupon 
on first issue bonds is payable on December 15. The last coupon on 
second issue bonds was payable on November 15 and before further 
interest can be collected it is necessary that the bonds be exchanged for 
those bearing the subsequent coupons or converted to registered bonds. 

First and second issue bonds carrying all subsequent coupons will not 
be ready for issue by the United States Treasury before March, 1920. 
In the meantime the Liberty Loan Committee will make necessary 
arrangements for insurance and transportation of bonds which have 
been subscribed for through the Panama Canal committee. 



T80 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Canal Medal Holders' Meirorial to Roosevelt. 

A Canal Zone memorial to Theodore Roosevelt is being prepared 
by men and women who earned the Canal medal by two or more years 
of service on the Panama Canal during construction days, who are 
still on the Isthmus. It is to be in the fo r m of a tablet, hand drawn 
on parchment of suitable design, framed in an especially designed 
frame of native wood, and to be presented to the family of Colonef 
Roosevelt. Under an appropriate inscription the tablet will bear the 
names of the medal holders who participate. Copies of the Incom- 
pleted design, with some of the names on it, have been posted in 
Canal clubhouses and in the rotunda of the Administration Building,. 
and employees who are qualified to take part whose names are not 
on the tablet, or are incorrectly spelled, are requested to forward 
their names to the Architect, Balboa Heights. Costs are being de- 
frayed by payment of 10 cents by each participant. 



Election of Officers of the Red Cross. 

In an election held on October 29, the following were chosen as 
officers for the Canal Zone Chapter of the American Red Cross for the 
ensuing year: Chairman, Mr. S. W. Heald; vice-chairman, Mr. R. B. 
Walker; secretary, Mrs. Louise W. Fulton; treasurer, Mr. R. W. 
Glaw; executive committee, Mr. Harrv Dockery, Mr. Roy R. Watson, 
Dr. C A. Hearne, and Mr. R. T. Martin. 

School for Employees Working at Night. 

In connection with the night school being conducted at the Balboa 
High School, inquiry has been received from an employee working 
at night whether classes in mechanical drawing and shop mathematics 
can be given in the afternoon for emoloyees who are unable to attend 
the night classes. The Superintendent of Schools advises that this 
can be arranged for Saturday afternoons, if enough employees wish 
to attend, and suggests that all who are interested communicate 
with the high school principal (telephone Balboa 48, postal address, 
Balboa; office, room 43, Balboa High School). 



Local Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations for The Panama Canal Service will l>e held at Balboa 
Heights, C. Z., on the dates set opposite the titles thereof: 

Clerk. December 21, 1919. 

Postal clerk. December 14, 1919. 

Stenographer and tvpist. December 14. 1919. 

The usual entrance salaries are: Clerk, $106 a month; postal clerk, $100 to $125 a month: stenogra- 
pher and typist, $137 for males and $116 for females. 

Full information in regard to the scope and the character of the examinations is contained in pam- 
phlet form 1424, "Information for Applicants for Stenographer and Typewriter Examination" » 
copv'of which mav be obtained from the Secretary, Board of Civil Service Examiners. Adminis- 
tration Building, Balboa Heights, C Z. Applicants for the clerk examination must take at least 
one ootional subiect in addition to the regular basis snbiects. The ootional subjects are- hirst. 
typewriting; second, bookkeeping; third, general business training and experience; fourth, time- 
keeping training and experience. If the third optional is taken, three letters of recommendation 
from former emplnvprs should accompanv the application 

Applicants for the examination for postal clerk must show that they have had at least one years 
experience as clerk in the United States or Canal Zone post offices or as postmaster or as Navy mail 
clerk and they are familiar with the receipt, distribution, and dispatch of mail matter, the issuance 
of money orders, registration of mail and the preparation of various reports required of postmasters 

Application form No. 1312 must be filled out. including the medical certificate but excluding the 
county officer's certificate, and should be filed promptly with the Board of Civil Examiners at Balboa 

Applicants must have reached their twentieth but not their forty-fifth birthday on the date of the 
examination, must be citizens of the United States, physically sound and in good health. 

Applicants must submit to the examiner on the day of the examination their photographs taken 
within two years, securely pasted in the place provided on the admission cards sent them after fneir 
applications' are filed. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



181 



Applicants for the clerk examination in answer to question No. 1 and on the outside of the form 
should state the optional subject taken in addition to the name of the examination required. 

In answer to question No. 4, applicant must show residence in some Stale or territory of the United 
States from the time of taking up residence therein to December, 1919, on account of temporary em- 
ployment on the Canal Zone and their retention of legal residence in the United States. The same 
must be shown as to the county. 

This examination is scheduled on the dates shown especially to provide for the examination of 
soldiers, sailors, marines, field clerks, and enlisted Army and Navy nurses who were unable to com- 
pete after April 6, 1917, and who are allowed 60 days from August 1, 1919, to do so, if they have been 
discharged prior to that date. Those discharged later will be allowed 60 days after discharge to 
compete; but, owing to our distance from the United States and the delay in receiving questions, all 
such persons should compete if possible on the date above mentioned. 

These examinations will also be open to any other applicants desiring to be examined for the Panama 
Canal Service. 

In addition to the examinations listed above, examinations for Stenographer, Typist and Sten- 
ographer-Typist in the Departmental Service in Washington, or elsewhere, will be held at Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. on December 7, 1919. These examinations are substantially the same as those for 
like positions with the Panama Canal Service, except that the minimum age limit is lower, namely 
18 years. The entrance salary for typist is usually $1,100 and that for stenographer $1,200, in the 
United States, but for employment in civilian positions with the U. S. Army on the Isthmus, the 
same salaries may be paid as in the Panama Canal Service. 

Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations arc announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number ot qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
canal post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons im crested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, 
Balboa Heights (telephone 286). Age limits do not apply to persons entitled to 
preference because of military or naval service. 

Airplane test pilot (male) ; $3,000 a year; No. 559, December 16, 1919; form 1312; age, no limits.* 

Assistant auditor (male and female); Grade I, $1,400 to $1,800 a year; Grade II, $2,000 to $2,500 
a year; No. 492-amended; December 14, 1919; form 1312; age, at least 20 years, but under 45 years. 

Electrical and mechanical engineer (male); $14perdiem; No. 549; December 16, 1919; form 1312; 
age, under 45 years.* 

Fish pathologist (male) ; $2,500 a year; No. 544; December 16, 1919; form 2118; age, at least 24 
years but under 45 years.* 

Laboratorian qualied in photography (male); $4.80 per diem; No. 548; December 16, 1919; form 
1312; age, at least 18 years but under 45 years.* 

Mechanical aid (male); $10 per diem; No. 547; December 16, 1919; form 1312; age, no limits.* 

Meteorologist (male) ; Grade 1, SI, 600 to S2.200 a year; grade 2, $2,200 to $3,000 a year; No. 553; 
December 23, 1919; form 1312; a.ne, no limits.* 

Preparator in entomology (male and female); $900 a year; No. 1, January 11 and 12, 1920, and 
April 11 and 12, 1920; form 304; age, IS years and over. 

Resident dentist (male): S2.000 to $2,500 a year; No. 540; December 9, 1919; form 1312; age. 
at least 25 years but under 35 years.* 

Town manager (male and female) ; $2,400 a year; No. 571; December 16, 1919; form 1312; age. 
at least 25 years.* 

♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 



Deceased and Insane Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased or insane employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama 
Railroad Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any 
Information which miqht lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, 
postal savings or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at 
the office of the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as 
possible. All claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having 
a seal, and submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 

DECEASED. 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of death. 


Alfonso Resist (Regis) 


174605 
2110o 
164279 
169313 

50630 
1586 
3'U77 
2S103 
21785 


Grenada 

Jamaica 

Jamaica 

Bonaire, D.W.I. . 

U.S. A 

Jamaica 

Jamaica 

Jamaica 




Building Division 

Health Department — 
Health Department — 

Section of Surveys 

R. & F. Agent 


July 3, 1919. 




October 5. 1919. 






October 20, 1919. 




Panama 


October 27, 1919. 




October 30, 1919. 






Commissary Division. . 

Building Division 

Building Division 

Supply Department — 


November 3, 1919. 






November 8, 1919. 


Reginald T McCalla 





November 9, 1919. 


Alfred Bowra 


Cristobal 


November 11, 1919. 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by- 


Date of 

commitment. 




39^03 
42040 




Panama 


Building Division 


August 23, 1919. 




Barbados 

Jamaica 


September 17, 1919. 


Samuel McKinney 
(McKiuley) 


Panama 


October 8, 1919. 



182 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Rates at Hotel Aspinwall, Taboga. 

The following are the current rates at the Aspinwall : 

Employees: Dinner, lodging, and breakfast $2 . 00 

Employees per day . . 2.75 

Children under 12 years of age per day. . 1 .25 

Servants of employees per day . . 1.50 

Employees for stay of 7 days per day. . 2.00 

Reduction of 10 per cent on above rates for stay of 30 days. Reduction of 
10 per cent for families of four or more for over 7 days' stay. 

Nonemployees per day . . 3.50 

Children of nonemployees (under 12 years of age) per day. . 1 .50 

Servants of nonemployees per day . . 1.75 

Meals: 

Breakfast 1 .00 

Luncheon 1 . 25 

Dinner 1.25 



Schedule of Official Jitney Service. 

Following is the schedule of the official jitney plying between Balboa 
shops and the Ancon police station, carrying employees in the 
conduct of official business, upon presentation of passes issued by the 
Chief Quartermaster, or of the "special pass" issued by the Governor: 

FROM ANCON POLICE STATION TO BALBOA SHOPS. 

Police Station. Leave on the hour and half hour. 

Administration Building Leave 7 minutes and 37 minutes after the hour. 

Balboa Commissary Leave 10 minutes and 40 minutes after the hour. 

Balboa Shops Arrive 15 minutes and 45 minutes after the hour. 

FROM BALBOA SHOPS TO ANCON POLICE STATION. 

Balboa Shops Leave 15 minutes and 45 minutes after the hour. 

Port Captain's Office Leave 18 minutes and 45 minutes after the hour. 

Balboa Commissary Leave 20 minutes and 50 minutes after the hour. 

Administration Building Leave 25 minutes and 55 minutes after the hour. 

Ancon Police Station Arrive on the hour and half hour. 



Official Circulars. apply to liquor in transit through the Panama 

Canal or on the Panama Railroad. 

That each and every violation of any of the 

Act Of Congress. — Prohibition of Intoxicat- provisions of this section shall be punished by a 

ing Liquors in the Canal Zone. fine of not more than SI, 000 or imprisonment not 

The Panama Canal, exceeding six months for a first offense and by a 

„ r n s tnan S200 nor more than §2,000 and 

„ ^xecutive Office, imprisonment not less than one month nor more 

Balboa Heights, C Z., November 6, 1919. t h a n five years for a second or subsequent offense. 

Circular No. 600-66: That all offenses heretofore committed within 

The extracts from the Act of Congress nuoted the Canal Zone may be prosecuted and all 

below are published for information of all con- penalties therefor enforced in the same manner 

erned. and to the same extent as if this Act had not been 

Chester Harding, passed. 

Governor. Sec. 21. Titles I and III and sections 1, 27, 
37, and 38 of Title II of this Act shall take effect 



AN ACT To prohibit intoxicating beverages, and and be in force from and after the passage and 
to regulate the manufacture, production, approval of the Act. The other sections of Title 
use, and sale of high-proof spirits for other H shall take effect and be in force from and after 
than beverage purposes, and to insure an the date when the eighteenth amendment of the 
ample supply of alcohol and promote its Constitution of the United States feoes into effect, 
use in scientific research and in the develop- Effective October 28, 1919. 
rrent of fuel, dye, and other lawful industries. _____^__^^_^_ 
Be. it enacted bv the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United States of America in Con- Use of Roads in Ancon Hospital Grounds. 
gress assembled. That the short title of this Act The Panama Canal, 
shall be the "National Prohibition Act." Executive Office 
******* Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 13, 1919. 

Title III. Circular No. 717-2 (superseding Circular No. 
******* 717) : 

Sec. 20. That it shall be unlawful to import or 1. By virtue of authority contained in Executive 
introduce into the Canal Zone, or to manufacture. Order of the President, dated September 5, 1916, 
sell, give away, dispose of, transport, or have in Circular No. 601-55), Section 3 of which author- 
one's possession or under one's control within izes the Governor by public notice to prohibit 
the Canal Zone, any alcoholic, fermented, brewed, motor vehicles of any or all kinds from operating 
distilled, vinous, malt, or spirituous liquors, on such portions of the roads in the Canal Zone 
except for sacramental, scientific, pharmaceutical, as he may designate, when, in his judgment, the 
industrial, or medicinal purposes, under regula- public interest requires it, or permit any of said 
tions to be made by the President, and any vehicles to be operated in any areas or districts 
such liquors within the Canal Zone in violation designated by him, upon such conditions as he 
hereof shall be forfeited to the United States may deem necessary and convenient for the wel- 
and seized: Provided, That this section shall not fare of The Panama Canal, the following order 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



183 



is hereby established effective November 20, 1919: 

2. The road through the Ancon Hospital 
grounds is hereby declared a one-way road, and no 
vehicles of any kind will be permitted to use this 
road in the direction from Panama to the top 
of the hill except such vehicles as it may be neces- 
sary to admit to the grounds on hospital business. 

3. Passenger automobiles will be permitted to 
pass through the Hospital grounds from the top 
of the hill toward Panama provided the engines 
are cut off and no unnecessary noise is made while 
passing through the grounds. Trucks, motor- 
cycles, or horse-drawn vehicles will not be per- 
mitted to use the road in either direction unless 
they have business within the hospital grounds. 

4. The entrance to the Hospital grounds will 
be indicated by suitable signs. The entrance 
from the Panama side is just beyond the steps 
leading to the Hospital Administration Building. 

5. Violation of this order is punishable under 
the provisions of the Executive Order abo^e re- 
ferred to, and offenders are subject to arrest. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Requests for Work. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 1, 1919. 
Circular No. 642-2 (superseding Circulars Nos. 

642 and 642-1): 

Requests for work to be performed, made be- 
tween departments and divisions of The Panama 
Canal or between The Panama Canal and the 
Panama Railroad Company, covering manufac- 
ture, repairs, alterations, and special services 
which can not conveniently be executed by the 
department making request, or which are specific 
functions of the department on which the request 
is made, and for work to be performed by The 
Panama Canal and Panama Railroad for outside 
interests, will be governed by the following: 

1. Work requests, made between departments 
and divisions or between The Panama Canal 
and Panama Railroad, will be submitted on Form 
159, for authorization by the Governor, when 
the estimated cost exceeds S500, except for main- 
tenance and repair work as covered by paragraph 
5. When the estimated cost is less than $500, the 
approval of the head of department or division 
only is required. 

2. Work requests covering allotments from 
appropriations for special work will be submitted 
on Form 159, for the authorization of the Gov- 
ernor, when the estimated cost exceeds $500. 
An allotment is not to be considered as authority 
to proceed with work, until it has been approved 
on regular work request. 

3. Work requests from outside interests will be 
submitted on Form 5172-1. Work may be per- 
formed for ships transiting the Canal or making 
Canal ports, irrespective of cost, without the 
authority of the Governor. Work for other 
individuals and companies must be authorized by 
the Governor when the estimated cost exceeds 
S500. 

4. The division performing work for outside 
interests must ascertain that a deposit has been 
made to cover or that payment is otherwise satis- 
factorily secured in accordance with regulations, 
before the work is started. 

5. Blanket work requests will be submitted on 
Form 159, and do not require the authorization 
of the Governor. They will be allowed to run 
until terminated or modified by the department 
or division making the request. Unless the work; 
to be performed is specified on the blanket au- 
thority, individual jobs under blanket authorities 
must be requested on Form 3431, and will be 
limited toS75. 

6. Maintenance and repairs of floating equip- 
ment and rolling stock in operation, electrical 
equipment, et cetera, and regular routine work 
such as loading and shipping of scrap wood for 
kindling, inspection of boilers and scales, et cetera, 
for which blanket authority has been issued on 
Form 159, may be requested on Form 3431, irre- 
epectiveiOf cost. 



7. No manufacturing work or work other than 
that specified in paragraph 6, will be authorized 
on Form 3431, in excess of $75, and when it is 
found that the cost of work requested will exceed 
this amount, Form 3431 must be returned for sub- 
mission of regular work request. Form 159, 
for the approval of the head of the department or 
division. This shall not be construed however as 
giving authority to divide up work that would 
otherwise fall naturally under paragraph 1 of 
this circular into separate items. 

8. Ordinary maintenance and repairs to Canal 
Zone waterworks, sewers, and roads may be 
made without work request. Ordinary mainte- 
nance to include minor repairs to pump stations, 
filtration plants, patching of roads or repairing 
breaks in water or sewer mains, et cetera: but 
all extensive repairs to waterworks, sewers, or 
roads, irrespective of cost, must be requested on 
Form 15y and authorized by the Governor. A 
monthly statement will be submitted to the 
Govenor showing the expense, by towns, for all 
maintenance work. 

9. These forms are intended to obviate requests 
or recommendations being made by letter 
covering work to be performed by another de- 
partment or division, but in addition they will 
take the place of requests for special authority 
when the work is to be performed by the depart- 
ment or division making the request. 

10. Estimates will be prepared and charges 
rendered in accordance with directions contained 
in the circular covering percentages and sur- 
charges, or as it may be modified from time to 
time. 

11. The estimated cost must be shown on all 
work requests. The division performing any 
work will advise the division for which the work 
is being performed when it is found that the 
estimated cost of any job will be materially ex- 
ceeded. 

12. Correspondence relating to any particular 
request shall give the number and date of same. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Rates for Use of Railroad Motor Cars. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 10, 1919. 

To all concerned — Circular No. RA-642, dated 
April 17, 1919, covering rates for use of railroad 
motor cars operated by The Panama Canal, is 
amended to read as follows: 
Employees and those entitled to em- 
ployees' rates per trip $35.00 

Individuals and companies, per trip 50.00 

The above rates are to be charged regardless of 
the nature of the trip, with the proviso that the 
rates will pay for tne use of the car by the 
occupants in one direction for not more than four 
hours from the time the car is ordered until the 
time it is released, and that $5 additional will be 
charged for each half hour or fraction thereof in 
excess of four hours that the car is used or detained 
by the party. 

Permission to use these cars for transportation 
of passengers must be obtained from the Execu- 
tive Office. The Panama Canal will charge the 
Panama Railroad at the hourly rate for the num- 
ber of hours that the cars are in use, from the 
time called until returned. The Panama Rail- 
road will collect at the above rates. 

Employees and those entitled to employees' 
rates will not be required to furnish any form of 
transportation. Outsiders will be required to 
purchase first-class tickets. 

It is to be understood that these cars will only 
be used in emergency cases, such as making con- 
nections with steamers. 

Ordinarily, when special transportation service 
is requested, the Panama Railroad will furnish 
special trains in accordance with Circular 536. 
S. W. Heald. 

Approved: Superi»tendftU- 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



184 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Scrap Grindstones. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z„ November 14, 1919. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

The Cattle Industry is in need of scrap grind- 
stones for use of silver employees in sharpening 
machetes, incident to pasture-clearing work. It 
is respectfully requested, therefore, that all old 
pieces of grindstones not in use by the different 
departments and divisions be for Aran led tn Air. 
L. A. Byrnes, Frijoles. where they can be made 
good use of. The Cattle Industry, of course, will 
pay freight charges on tne grindstones. 

In this connection, you are advised that grind- 
stones are now carried as expendable material, 
the frames only being considered nonexpendable. 
R. K. Morris, 
Chief Quartermaster. 



Misdirected Letters. 



Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 17, 1919. 

The following insufficiently addressed mail has 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be obtained upon request of the address- 
ees. Request may be made by telephone, calling 
No. 182, Balboa: 



Bice, Mrs. Minnie 
Blackan, Mrs. M. 
Bodden, Arlington 
Ceville, Mrs. Leonidas 
Cloke, Harold C. 
Davila, Jose, Box 537 
Dougherty, Charles F. 
Gowan, Mrs. John 
Grey, Egbert, Box 839 
Hallett, B. 
Hanson, George 
Hardrick, Eddie 
Harris, Claxton W. 



Hutchinson, Charles E., 

Box 93. 
Keating, Patrick 
Levy, Mrs. Rose 
Livingston, Robert R. 
Miller," Capt. A. I. 
Peters, Edwin 
Piper, Mrs. E. D. 
Reid, C. 
Reeve, Mrs. A. L., Box 

164 
Sitton, Moses, Box 289 
Torrento, Miss Rose, 

Box 235 



October Rainfall for Three Years. 





INCHES. 
















ci 










9> 


"B 


a> 


Stations. 








09 




_j 




1919 


1918 


1917 


a 
a 
.2 

55 


S3 


"O 
>> 

a 


Pacific section— 














Balboa 


11.82 


8.52 


5.79 


9.44 


21 


21 


Balboa Heights 


12.11 


9.16 


6.14 


10.33 


23 


22 


Miraflores 


1 1 .54 


10.01 


7.56 


12.00 


12 


23 


Pedro Miguel . . 


11.25 


10 57 


6 01 


11.79 


12 


24 


Rio Grande 


16.37 


16.02 


5.92 


12.74 


IS 


29 


Central section — 














Culebra 


15.62 


16.81 


5.56 


11.56 


31 


27 


Camacho 


13.66 


16.66 


6.76 


13.23 


14 


30 




12.41 


20.15 


6.38 


13.22 


15 


29 




11.72 


17.25 


11.21 


12.76 


37 


27 


Juan Mina. . . . 


14.57 


16.77 


11.75 


14.81 


10 


22 


Alhajuela 


15 .46 


12.03 


13.73 


14.08 


21 


26 


Vi^ia 


12.01 


13.81 


16.88 


15.86 


12 


27 


FYiHes 


18.92 


19.36 


9.20 


16 28 


8 




T- dad 


15.85 


15.71 


10 03 


14.60 


12 


28 


Mouie Lirio . . . 


15.84 


23 .57 


10.04 


16.72 


12 


27 


Atlantic section- 














C-.tun 


17.46 


22.73 


10.05 


16.56 


15 


27 


Lrazos Brook. . 


20.65 


27.30 


m.50 


17.24 


14 


25 




21.94 


27.07 


/.87 


15.03 


50 


26 







Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Dry Goods Section. 

Bags, shopping, Mochilas, ea i 

Braid, E. Z., trim, assorted colore, 2-yd. pc. 

Pine, hair, invisible, bronze, 1 i", pkg 

Pins. hair, invisible, bronze, 2", pkg 



.73 
.25 
.04 
.04 



Stationery: 

Pencils, Eversharp, ea $0 . 89 

Pencils, Eversharp, ea 1 . 20 

Pencils, Eversharp, ea 1 . 40 

Pencils, Eversharp, ea 1 . 20 

Pencils, Eversharp, ea 1 .40 

Pencils, Eversharp, ea 2.00 

Pencils, Eversharp, ea 2.40 

Suiting: 

Alpaca, men's, 54", yd 1 .90 

Alpaca, men's, 54", yd 1 . 35 

Cotton and jute, tropical, 54", yd 1.80 

Cotton and jute, tropical, 54", yd 1.30 

Drill, union, bleached, 27", yd 86 

Drill, union, bleached, 27", yd 1.05 

Duck, union, tropical, 27", yd 49 

Serge, blue, 56", yd 4 . 80 

Serge, blue, 56", yd 4.95 

Serge, blue, 56", yd 4.95 

Serge, blue, 54", yd 3.85 

Groceries Section. 
Aerated waters and beverages: 

Club soda, P. C, bot 09 

(5 cents refund for return of empty bottle.) 
Arrow root, powdered (for steamship trade 

only) 5-lb. tin, per lb 36 

Jam, Peachlade, 2s tin 34 

Jelly, Guava, Cuba, £-lb. box 14 

Paste, Guava, Cuban, lib. box 19 

Peas, petit pois, French, Is tin 38 

Hardware Section. 

Cases, key, pigskin, 6-hook, ea 56 

Forks, kitchen, ea 17 

Lamps, bicycle, Everlit, ea 1 . 80 

Pumps, bicycle, Crown, ea 1 .35 

Shells, shotgun, smokeless powder, 16gauge, 

No. 1-B shot, 25s box 1.03 

Shells, shotgun, smokeless powder, 16 gauge, 

No. 4 shot, 25s box 1.05 

Shells, shotgun , smokeless powder, 1 6 gauge, 

No. 6 shot, 25s box 1 .05 

Shells, shotgun, smokeless powder, 16 gauge, 

No. 7 shot, 25s box 1.05 

Note. — To be stocked at Cristobal, Balboa, 
Ancon, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel Commissaries 
only. 
Automobile and motorcycle accessories: 

Batteries, motorcycle, No. 4-N, ea $17.00 

Fluid, tire, Neverleak, tube 19 



Rainfall from Oct. 1 to 31, 191£ 


, Inclusive. 


Stations. 


.a 

2 * 
■a « 

a a 


Q 


"3 

O 


Pacific section — 


Ins. 
2.00 
1.90 
2.02 
2.18 
1.98 
3.33 

2.15 
2.76 
2.16 
2.29 
4.04 
3.48 
2.00 
1.95 
2.74 
2.36 

2.10 
3.54 
3 51 
1.20 
3.41 


10&15 
18 
18 
18 
18 
24 

24 
19 
18 
18 
10 
22 
24 
10 
31 
11 

9 

9 

Hi 

23 

22 


Ins. 
10.35 




11.82 




12.11 




11.54 




11.25 




16.37 


Centra 1 section — 


15 62 




13.66 




12.41 




11.72 




14.57 




15.46 




12.01 




11.57 


♦Trinidad 


15.85 




15.84 


Atlantic section — 


17 M 








21 .y4 




7.52 


Porto Bello 


15.71 



• Standard rain gauge — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gauge at unstarred stations — values, 
midnight to midnight. 
{Standard rein gauge — readings at 8 a. m, daily. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, S1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panamn Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Poit Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 26, 1919. No. 15. 



Sailing Ships through the Canal. 

The 3-masted bark Georgette, loaded with lumber, arrived at Balboa 
from Seattle on November 23, on her way to Alexandria, Egypt. 
Thirty-five thousand feet of her cargo of 882 tons had gone overboard 
in a storm. TheGeorgette is 187 feet 8 inches in length by 36 feet beam, 
and has Panama Canal net tonnage of 757. She carries a crew of 13, 
including the wife and two children of the master, who are signed on. 
The distance from Seattle to Alexandria by the routes of steamships 
is 10,279 miles by way of the Canal. 

On the same day the 4-masted bark Annie M. Reid came in from 
San Francisco, on the way to the United Kingdom with a cargo of 
3,220 tons of barley. She is 291 feet 3 inches long by 42 feet 2 inches 
beam, and her Canal net tonnage is 2,079. 

From July 1, 1917, to November 1, 1919, 111 sailing ships have made 
the transit of the Canal. During the same period 4,677 other commer- 
cial ships passed through. The sailing ships were, accordingly, 2.37 
per cent of the steam and motor ships. Their aggregate net tonnage 
was 208,568 tons, Panama Canal measurement, 1.41 per cent of 
the net tonnage of the other commercial ships. The sailing ships 
had an average net tonnage of 1,879 tons. 

The numbers of sailing ships passing through the Canal each month 
in the period, with their aggregate net tonnages, are given below: 



Month. 



July, 1917 

Au?u>t 

September. 

October 

November. . . . 

December 

January, 1918. 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November.. . . 

December 

January, 1919. 

February 

Man-h 

Anril 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.. . . 
October 



Total. 



Vessels. 



42 



Net tons 
P.O. 



3,183 



2,160 



5,463 
10,683 
5,762 
8,891 
4,124 
2,658 
2,067 
10,597 
4,788 
10,225 
2,345 



4,063 

'"875 



78,490 



Vessels. 



Net tons, 
P. C. 



1,041 
835 
503 

3,121 



5,325 
9,731 
2,467 
7,861 

2,324 
4,379 

12.778 
9,827 
4.948 

11,049 
7.413 
2,658 
4 991 
2,206 
5,648 
7,936 
1,630 
4,725 
1.171 
6,162 
8,665 
654 



69 130,078 



Total. 



Vessels. **$*%*• 



4,224 

835 

533 

3,121 



111 



2,166 

5,325 

9,731 

2,467 

13,324 

13,007 

10,141 

21,669 

13,951 

7,006 

13,716 

18,010 

7,446 

15,216 

4,551 

5,648 

11,999 

1,630 

5 600 

1,171 

6.162 

8,665 

654 

20S.568 



For the 28 months the average number of sailing ships per month 
from Atlantic to Pacific was 1.5, and from Pacific to Atlantic, 2.46, 
average total of 3.96. The average aggregate net tonnage per month 
was 7,448.8 tons. 



186 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



187 



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188 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



13.50 
17.00 



Coal and Laundry Prices. 

The Panama Canal has issued the following Supplement No. 2 
to Tariff No. 3: 

The Panama Canal, Panama Railroad Company, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 8, 1919. 
The following amendments are made to Tariff No. 3, Schedule of Rates for Supplies 
and Services Furnished to Shipping and Allied Interests at the Panama Canal: 

Item 21. — Coal. 

Effective November 16, 1919. 

Cristobal- t,.. „ 
f ~ . Colon. Balboa - 

1. hor steamships,- including warships of all nations, delivered from 

coaling plants or alongside of vessels in lighters or in cars on the 
wharves and trimmed in bunkers, per ton ot 2,240 pounds, ex- 
cept as provided in paragraph 2 $13.50 $15.50 

2. For vessels transiting the Canal that are directed by The Panama 

Canal to take coal at Balboa on account of the condition of the 
plants, the quantity available, or for the purpose of expediting 
transit 

3. To steamships taking less than carload lots from plants, or less 

than 25 tons from lighters 15.00 

4. Y\ hen request is made by commander of vessel, chief engineer, or 

agent, for trimming on deck, between decks, or special trimming 
in bunkers for convenience of vessel, an additional charge of 60 
cents per ton will be made for extra handling. 

5. For lump coal for galley use, delivered in sacks, additional charge 

per ton, $10. Should the vessel furnish satisfactory sacks, the 
price will be only $3 per tori additional. Not more than 5 tons 
will be supplied to a vessel. 

6. For coal for cargo which will be delivered only in exceptional cases 

after special authority is given by the Governor 16.00 18.00 

Item 26. — Laundry. 

Effective October 15, 1919. 
1. For laundry called for and delivered to ship, where the total bill exceeds $10 
the following rates plus 25 per cent will obtain, subject to change without republica- 
tion in this circular: 

Aprons $0.01 Napkins $0.01 

Bedspreads 

Blankets 

Bolster cases 

Caps, cooks' 

Cloths, table 

Cloths, table, extra large 

Coats, white 

Covers, furniture 

Covers, mattress 

Curtains 

Doilies 

Gowns, convalescent 

Jumpers 

Mosquito bars 



.15 
.15 
.01 
.01 
.02 
.05 
.13 
.15 
.05 
.15 
.01 
.10 
.05 
10 



Niehtshirts. 

Operating gowns 

Pajama suits 

Pants, colored 

Pillowcases 

Sheets 

Towels, bath 

Towels, bath, extra large 

Towels, brown 

Towels, glass 

Towels, roller 

Tow els, room 

Towels, side 

Trousers, white (cook's, etc.) . 



.05 
.10 
.10 
.05 
.02 
.02 
.02 
.05 
.02 
.02 
.02 
.02 
.02 
.10 



Chester Hardixg, 
Governor The Panama Canal. 
President Panama Railroad Company. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending November 22, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 




Pacific Mail Steamship Co 

Pacific Metals Corporation 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 


November 19. 
November 10. 
November 20 . 
November 22. 




Tons. 



Tom. 
10 


Laura C. Hail 


November 20. 
November 21. 
November 22. 


4 

205 
4 


21 


Salvador 





THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



189 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending November 22, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Line or charterer. 



Acajutla Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Bologna La Veloce Steamship Line 

City of Para Pacific Mail Steamship Line 

Mantaro Peruvian Steamship Line. ........ 

Allianca Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Metapan United Fruit Company 

DeL t Royal Netherland Steamship Line. 

Ulysses Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Victoria Royal Mail Steam Packet Co ...... 

Gen. 0. H. Ernst. . . Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Tivives United Fruit Company 

Namecki United States Shipping Board 

Abangarez United Fruit Company 

Houston United States Navy ; 

Aeuelo United States Shipping Board — 

Senator Harrison Line 

Aysen South American Steamship Line. . 

Laura C. Hall Pacific Metals Corporation 

Jamaica Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Cauca | Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Middlebury Panama Railroad Commissary — 

Metapan United Fruit Company. ......... 

Colon I Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 



San Juan 
Puerto Rico. 
Salvador. .. . 
Fort Gaines. 



Pacific Mail Steamship Line.. 

French Line 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co. 
Caribbean Steamship Co 



Arrived. 



November 1G. 
November 16. 
November 17. 
November 17. 
November 17. 
November 17. 
November 18. 
November 18. 
November 18. 
November 19. 
November 19. 
November 19. 
November 20. 
November 20 
November 20 
November 20 
November 20 



November 21 
November 21 
November 21 
November 21 
November 22 
November 22 
November 22. 



Departed. 



Discharged Laded 



November 16.. 
November 17., 
November 19. 
November 22. 
November 22. 
November 19. 
November 19. 
November 20. 
November 19. 



November 19. 
November 21. 
November 20, 
November 20 



November 22. 
November 22 
November 22 



Cargo- 



es 

2,812 
1,802 
1,041 
242 
12,243 
(*) 

2,345 

35 

2,748 

1,109 

7 

2,934 

930 

978 

61 

693 



500 

850 

2,822 

1,267 

438 

155 

1 



Tons. 
(t) 
(t) 

1,521 

887 

2,349 

100 

(t) 

(t) 

440 



(t) 

1 
ft) 



37 
152 



1,001 
5 
(+) 



'No cargo discharged. 



t No cargo laded. 



Italian Line in West Coast Trade. 

With the passage of the steamship Bologna through the Canal on No- 
vember 17, on the way from Genoa to Valparaiso, the La Veloce 
Navigazione Italiana a Vapore ("La Veloce" Line) has begun a regular 
service between Italy and Ecuadorian, Peruvian, and Chilean ports, 
in which a steamer will sail about every 60 days. This is an extension 
through the Canal of the line which has been operating for a number of 
years between Italian and Caribbean ports, by way of Marseilles, 
Barcelona, and Teneriffe, and the line will continue its former service 
both ways while operating on the west coast as well. 

Gatun Lake Storage for Dry Season. 

Gatun Lake has been allowed to fill to the level of 87 feet above sea 
level, in preparation for the coming dry season. Ordinarily the sur- 
face is raised to 87 feet about the middle of December, but on account 
of relatively scanty rainfall over the watershed during the early part 
of November, with the possibility of an early dry season, it was decided 
to store the customary reserve without delay. A maximum elevation 
of 87.06 feet at Gatun was reached on November 19, since which 
date the surface has been controlled at approximately 87. With the 
surface 87 feet above sea level the depth of water in the Cut is approxi- 
mately 47 feet. 

Sale of the Dredge "Corozal." 

The ladder dredge Corozal, built at Renfrew, Scotland, in 1911, 
and used in digging the Canal from April, 1912, to February, 1919, 
has been transferred to the Engineering Department of the United 
States Army. The price was $190,000, and spare parts were listed at 
$125,000. The original cost of the Corozal was $449,000. The dredge 
is to be towed to Philadelphia by a Navy collier. 



190 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line Tariff Changes. 

The Panama Railroad Steamship Line has issued Supplement No. 
2 to Freight Classification and Tariff No. 28, publishing class and 
commodity rates from New York, N. Y., to Pacific ports in Colombia, 
Ecuador, Peru, and Chile, effective November 15, 1919. 

It affects rates on cement, newsprint paper, and lubricating oil, 
and publishes the following concerning storage charges: 

The Panama Railroad Steamship Line will collect from shippers storage charges 
at the rate of 10 cents per day per bill of lading ton or fraction thereof, or 5 cents 
per package per day, at steamer's option, on all packages for which shipping docu- 
ments (bills of lading, and, when required, consular papers) are not presented at this 
office in time to be forwarded by the steamer carrying the cargo. The charge will be 
counted from the date of departure of steamer carrying the cargo up to and including 
the date of departure of the subsequent steamer upon which the bills of lading are 
actually forwarded. 

Comparative Wind Records.— Cape Mala, Sosa Hill, and Balboa Heights, 

October, 1919. 

The total wind movement for the month of October, 1919, was practically the 
same at Cape Mala and Sosa Hill, and 59 per cent greater than the wind move- 
ment at Balboa Heights. The average hourly velocities were: Sosa Hill, 9.6 miles, 
Cape Mala, 9.6 miles, and Balboa Heights 6.1 miles. 

Northwest winds prevailed at Balboa Heights and Sosa Hill and southwest winds 
at Cape Mala. 

The maximum velocities recorded during the month were: Sosa Hill, 33 miies 
from the southeast on the 24th ; Balboa Heights, 31 miles from the south on the same 
date; and Cape Mala, 40 miles from the east on the 4th. 

Note — Elevation of anemometers: Sosa Hill, 35 feet above ground and 405 feet above mean =ea 
level; Balboa Heights, 97 feet above ground and 231 feet above sea level; and Cape Mala, 110 feet 
above ground and 150 feet above sea level. 

December Weather Probabilities. 

The following weather conditions may be expected at the Canal 
entrances during the month of December, 1919. Predictions are 
based on Colon and Ancon-Balboa Heights records for the past 12 
and 13 years, respectively: 

Winds — With the approach of the dry season, there will be an acceleration of the 
wind movement at both Canal entrances. North and northeast winds will prevail 
over the Atlantic Coast, with an average hourly velocity of from 9 to 14 miles an 
hour, the higher velocity occurring from noon to 5 p. m. The maximum velocity for 
a 5-minute period is not likely to exceed 35 miles an hour. 

Northwest winds will continue over the interior and at the Pacific entrance, the 
average hourly velocity being from 6 to 9 miles an hour. Here, too, a maximum 
velocity of 35 miles an hour may occur during occasional wind squalls. 

Rain — The month of December usually marks the transition from rainy season to 
dry season conditions. Occasionally the dry season begins as early as the 1st of the 
month, while in other years rainy season weather has continued until the end of the 
month. The tendency is for the rains to linger later in the season along the Atlantic 
Coast than on the Pacific, and for the percentage of daytime rainfall to be greater on 
the Pacific side. The average rainfall for the month is 11.69 inches at the Atlantic 
entrance, and 4.28 inches at the Pacific entrance. These averages are for periods of 
48 and 22 years, respectively. About 21 days with rain may be expected on the 
Atlantic Coast and about 15 on the Pacific side, while the average number of days 
with heavy rain (1 inch or more) is 3 and 2, respectively. 

Fogs — No fogs are likely to occur at either Canal entrance, but night and early 
morning fogs may be expected over the interior. The average number of fogs during 
the month over the Gaillard Cut section of the Canal is 15. All of the fogs that 
occur may be expected to lift or become dissipated before 8.30 a. m. 

Temperature-^-The average shade air temperature will be close to 80° F. over 
both coasts. On the Atlantic Coast the temperature is not likely to rise above 90° F., 
or fall lower than 66° F., while on the Pacific side a maximum temperature as high 
as 94° F. may occur. The minimum record on both coasts is 66° F. The mean daily 
range in temperature should be about 8° F. on the Atlantic Coast, and 16° on 
the Pacific. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



191 



Barometric pressure — Atmospheric pressure over the Isthmus is remarkably con- 
stant and uniform, and except for the well-marked diurnal changes, local fluctua- 
tions in pressure are so slight that they have little value as indicators of future weather 
conditions. The average sea level pressure will continue close to 29.85 inches. 
The maximum reading for the month is not likely to exceed 30 inches, nor the mini- 
mum to fall lower than 29.65 inches. 

Relative humidity — With the approach of the dry season there will be a decrease in 
the percentage of moisture in the air. The humidity should average about 85 per 
cent over both coasts. The daily range, however, is greater on the Pacific Coast. 

Storms — The so-called "northers" occasionally reach as tar south as the Atlantic 
entrance to the Canal during the period from October or November to April, in- 
clusive. These storms are characterized by brisk, northerly winds, ranging in velocity 
up to 30 or more miles an hour. The winds alone are of insufficient force seriously to 
affect navigation, but they are usually accompanied by a heavy sea or swell that may 
at times prove very troublesome. Local thunderstorms will not be so frequent dm ing 
the month of December. The average number of thunderstorms during the month is 
4 on the Atlantic Coast, and 5 on the Pacific. 

Generally smooth seas may be expected throughout the month at the Pacific 
entrance to the Canal. 

Tides — Tidal fluctuations at Colon are so slight that they need not be considered 
in navigating the Atlantic entrance to the Canal. 

Panama tide predictions for the month are given below: 



Da 


Y of- 
Mo. 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Height of 
and Low Water 


High 


W. 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 




M 


I 


3:33 9:13 
3.8 12.9 


3:54 9:49 
3.6 13.8 


F 


12 


1:09 
0.7 


7:17 
16.0 


1:30 
0.3 


7:49 
18.1 


Tu 


n 


4:08 10:39 
14.2 1.3 


4:43 
14.1 


10:53 
2.4 


Tu 


2 


4:35 10:17 
3.7 12.8 


4:55 10:52 
3.6 14.0 


s 


13 


2:02 
1.5 


8:08 
15.1 


2:22 
1.3 


8:39 
15.3 


W 


24 


4:47 11:15 
14.3 1.1 


5:22 
14.4 


11:31 


\Y 


3 


5:37 11:28 
3.2 13.1 


6:00 11:57 
3.4 14.6 


S 


14 


2:59 
2.3 


9:00 
14.1 


3:16 
2.4 


9:30 
14.5 


Th 


^5 


5:25 11:50 
14.3 1.1 


5:57 
14.6 




Th 


4 


6:40 12:34 
2.5 13.8 


7:04 

2.8 


M 


15 


3:58 
3.0 


9:55 
13.2 


4:13 
3.3 


10:25 
13.8 


F 


26 


0:08 6:02 
2.1 14.3 


12:28 
1.3 


6:32 
14.6 


F 


5 


0:59 7:41 
15.3 1.5 


1:35 8:04 
14 .6 2 .0 


Tu 


16 


4:57 
3.5 


10:56 
12.5 


5:13 
4.0 


11:24 
13.3 


S 


27 


0:46 6 :38 
2.1 14.2 


1:04 
1.5 


7:08 
14.6 


S 


6 


1:55 8:38 
16.1 0.5 


2:32 9:00 
15.5 1.1 


W 


17 


5:56 12:01 
3.7 12.2 


6:12 
4.3 




s 


28 


1:28 7:17 
2.3 14.0 


1:44 
1.9 


7:46 
14.6 


S 


7 


2:50 9:30 
16.7 -0.5 


3:28 9:52 
16.2 0.3 


Th 


18 


:23 
13.2 


6:55 
3.6 


12:59 
12.3 


7:10 
4.4 


M 


29 


2:13 7:59 
2.5 13.7 


2:30 
2.3 


8:29 
14.5 


M 


8 


3:45 10:20 
17.2 -1.1 


4:23 10:41 
16.8 0.2 


F 


19 


1:15 
13.2 


7:49 
3.3 


1:51 
12.6 


8:05 
4.1 


Tu 


30 


3 :04 8 :48 
2.6 13.4 


3:22 
2.6 


9:18 
14.4 


Tu 


9 


4:40 11:07 
17.3 -1.4 


5:18 11:30 
17.0 -0.3 


S 


20 


2:02 
13.4 


8:39 

2.7 


2:37 
13.0 


8:53 
3.6 


W 


31 


4 :00 9 :45 
2.6 13.1 


4:21 
2.9 


10:17 
14.2 


\V 


,o 


5:34 11:53 
17.2 -1.2 


6:10 

17.0 


S 


21 


2:45 
13.7 


9:22 
2.2 


3:20 
13.4 


9:38 
3.2 












Th 


1 1 


0:10 6:27 12:40 7:00 
00 16.7 -0.6 16.7 


M 


22 


3:26 
14.0 


10:02 
1.7 


4:03 
13.8 


10:16 
2.7 













The tides are placed in the order of their occurrence; the times of high and low tides are shown on 
the upper lines. The figures in boldfaced type are hours and elevations between noon and midnight; 
ante meridian figures are given in the ordinary lightfaced type. The time is Cosmopolitan Standard 
for the meridian 75° W. 

The elevntions of the water are shown on the second line for each day; a comparison of consecutive 
heights will indicate whether it is high or low water. Heights are reckoned from mean low water 
springs, which is 8.3 below mean sea level and is the datum of soundings on the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey charts for this region. The depth of water may accordingly be estimated by adding the tabu- 
lar height of the tide to the soundings, unless a minus (-) sign is before the height, in which case it 
is to be subtracted. The annual inequality or variation in the mean sea level is included in the 
predictions. 

Increased Charges for Moving Pictures. 

The Governor has approved the following prices to be charged for 
moving pictures in the Panama Canal clubhouses, effective December 1 : 

Gold clubhouses — Children under 12 years of age, 10 cents; all others, 15 cents. 

Silver clubhouses — Children and adults, 10 cents. 

These increases are made on account of the increased prices which 
are being chaiged for films. 



192 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which there 
are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canaf 
post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights (telephone 286). Age limits do not apply to persons entitled to preference 
because of military or naval service. 

Specialist in cotton classing or marketing (male and female) ; S2.700 to $3,600 a year; December 23. 
191°; form 2118; age, 25 years but not 45 years.* 

Mechanical engineer, qualified in internal combustion engine work (male); $3,000 to $3,600 a year;: 
December 23, 1919; form 2118; age, no limits.* 

Held and laboratory aid in plant nutrition (male and female); $t,200 a year; January II, 1920; 
form 1312; age, 20 years but not 45 years. 

Assistant biologist qualified in esonomic ornithology (male and female); $1,440 to $1,800 a year-, 
January 11, 1920; form 1312; age, under 45 years. 



*Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in. the hands of the Commission at Washington prior Co the hour of closing business- 
on- that date. 



Deceased Employees, 



The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information' 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the* Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estates may be settled as soon as possible. AIT 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary pubHc, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be publisned but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of— 


Isthmian 

residence. 


Employed by— 


Date of death. 


Wm S Horn 


51039 
2657 

35502 


Barbados 

U.S. A !. 

St. Vrncent 


Camp Bierd, .... 


R.&F. Agent 

Mechanical Division .... 

Supply Department 


October 23, 1919. 
November 23, 1919. 


Clarence Cordics alias . 
Cortez 




November 19, 1919. 



Official Circulars. 



Acting Captain of the Port, Balboa, and Act- 
ing Member of Board of Local Inspectors. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., November 24, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective this date and duT- 
i-ng the absence on leave of Lieut. -Com. Chas. 
Svensson. V. S. N. R. F., Capt. L,. A. Helliksen 
will act as Captain of the Port, Balboa. and 
MembeF of the Boajrd of Local Inspectors. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Purchase of Reduced Rate Tickets. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 21, 1919. 
Circular No. 1423: 

Conductors, collectors, and agents — -Please be 
informed that photo-metal checks Nos. 1 tol9999, 
indusive, are assigned to gold employees, and 
any holder of a photo-metal check of the above 
series is entitled to the privileges of a gold roll 
employee when purchasing reduced rate tickets 
provided for in Circular RA-660. 

W. F. Foster, 
Master of Transportation. 



Handling of Scrap. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 13, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective December 1, mis- 
cellaneous scrap operations previously handled 
by the Storekeeper, Cristobal, will be discontinued 
and in the future handled by the General Store- 
keeper at Bafboa. 

On and after December 1 all miscellaneous 
scrap, including aluminum, babbitt, bags and 
burlap, brass, canvas, eopper, crucibles, hose, 
lead, leather, rope, rubber, zinc, etc., should be 
collected and forwarded to the General Store- 
keeper, Balboa, for handling and credit. 

Until further notice iron and steel scrap should 
be collected and forwarded to the Storekeeper, 
Cristobal, for handling and credit. 

R. K. Morris, 
Chief Quartermaster. 



School Holiday. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Offige of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 18, 1919. 
Circular No. 1421: 

To conductors and collectors — Canal Zone schools 
will be closed Thanksgiving Day, November 27, 
and Friday, November 28. 

School passes are not to be honored on those 
dates. 

W. F. Foster, 
Master of Transportation. 

Misdirected Letters. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 24, 1919. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters- 
have been received in the office of the Director 
of Posts, and may be obtained upon request of 
the addressees. Request may be made by tele- 
phone, calling No. 182, Balboa: 
Dwyer, John Gordon Macdonald, Robert C. 



Goodyear, D. P. 
Hammond, Chas. 
Hubley, Mrs. C. W. 
Kipping, Victor, Box 
875 



Nieset, Joe. H., Box 528- 
Rousseau, S. W., Bo* 

154 
Yeager, Frank 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



193 



Joint Commission. 



Rules of Dismissal. 

In the mailer of the claimof R.S- Arcia, Eusebio 
Morales, Ricardo Arias, et al., for lands known as 
Rio Indio and Mindi, Rule of Dismissal No. 432, 
dor! el No. 3277, November 13, 1(19- At the 
r^a-Jest of Carmen Brachc, one of the claimants 
in claim docket No. 327? who has filed a state- 
ment to the effect that she has made settlement 
direct with representatives of the United States 
Government, the above-entitled claim is hereby 
dismissed insofar as any interest the said Carmen 
Bracho may have had therein. 

Julio J. Fabrega, Burt New, Jorge E. Boyd, 
George A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



In the mailer of 'the claim ofl.eonardoF. Solorzano 
for property located in the city of Panama, Rule 
of Dismissal No. 433, docket No. 3503, Novem- 
ber 13, 1919 — At the request of counsel for claim- 
ant, and in accordance with his motion filed with 
the Commission on November 10, 1919, the 
claim of Leonardo F. Solorzano, docket No. 3503 
is hereby dismissed. 

George A. Connolly, Jorge E. Boyd, Julio 
J. Fabrega, Burt New, Commissioners. 



Current Prices on Coal, Fuel Oil, and Beef. 

Coal is bein^ supplied to steamships, including 
warships of all nations, delivered and trimmed 
in bunkers, at $13.50 per ton of 2,240 pounds at 
Cristobal and $15.50 at Balboa. For ships in 
transit through the Canal, which are directed to 
take coal at Balboa, for the convenience of The 
Panama Canal. $13.50 per ton at Balboa. For 
ships taking less than carload lots from plants or 
less than 25 tons from lighters, the price is $15 
per ton at Cristobal, $17 at Balboa. 

Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either 
Cristobal or Balboa for $2 00 per barrel of 42 
gallons. 

Diesel oil is not sold by The Panama Canal, 
but may be obtained from private concerns at 
approximately $3 per barrel. Cable arrange- 
ment should be made in advance of arrival of 
vessel. • r u u c 

The following are current prices on fresh beef 
sold from the cold storage plant of the Canal. 
Prices quoted are United States currency, per 
pound net: 

Beef hinds, 19 cents; beef fores, 14 cents; 
beef ribs, entire set, 20 cents; short loins, 25 
cents. This beef is from Colombian cattle, 
slaughtered on the Isthmus. 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maximum elevations of the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake, and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sea level, during the three weeks ending at 
midnight of Saturday, November 22, were as fol- 
lows : 



IChagres River 


Gatun Lake 


Mira- 


Date 


, r . . | Alha- 


Gam- 






v 'g' a j juela 


boa 


Gatun 


Lake 


Pun., Nov. 2 j 


129.00 93.94 


86 61 


S6.57 


54.24 


Mon., Nov. 3. . . 


i29.45 94.11 


86.58 


S6.59 


54.40 


Tues., Nov. 4.... 


12S.20 


93.77 


80 82 


86.79 


54.10 


Wed., Nov. 5 


137.95 


101.30 


86.86 


86.82 


54.26 


Thur=., Nov. 6. . . 


131.55 


91.95 


86.75 


86.76 


54 22 


Fri., Nov. 7 


130.05 


94 . 52 


86.58 


86. 5S 


54.10 


Sat., Nov. 8 


129 25 


94 . 52 


86.59 


86.58 


54.10 


Sun., Nov. 9 


130.25 


94 . 09 


86.57 


86.58 


54 10 


Mon., Nov. 10 


129.00 


93.55| 80.77 


86.6! 


54.26 


Tues., Nov. 11... 


129.00 


93.72 


86 87 


86.75 


54.27 


Wed., Nov. 12.... 


127.90 


92.75 


86.81 


86.75 


54.00 


Thurs., Nov. 13.. 


127.55 


92.41 


86.85 


86.69 


53.94 




127 35 


92.1.8 


86.90 


86.70 


53 75 


Sat., Nov. 15 


127.20 


92. 0G 


86.90 


86.74 


53.70 


Sun., Nov. 16.... 


127.20 


92.08 


86.85 


S6.85 


53.71 


Mon., Nov. 17. . . 


127.25 


92. K 


86.94 


86.94 


53.97 


Tues., Nov. 18... 


127.20 


92. 1C 


86.99 


86.99 


54.03 


Wed., Nov. 19... 


127.50 


92.05 


87.05 


87.06 


53.90 


Thurs., Nov. 20.. 


128 25 


93.16 


86.97 


87.06 


53 80 


Fri., Nov. 21 


129.20 


91.07 


86.99 


87.02 


53.75 


Sat., Nov. 22 


12S.05 


93.63 


87.10 


87.03 


53.85 


Height of low water 












to nearest foot . 


125.0 9 







Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Groceries Section. 

Plums, egg, 2*s tin $0.35 

Hardware Section. 

Automobile and motorcycle accessories: 
Bars, handle, bicycle, Sure Grip, No. 4, 

ea 2.80 

Pedals, bicycle. Majestic, No. 20, pr. . . 1 10 

Chinaware, Doulton, miscellaneous: 
Bowls, nursery rhyme, Clavton E-1441, 

ea • 

Bowls, E-4090, 36s, ea 51 

Bowls, sugar, Rheims, E-8079, ea 36 

Bowls, sugar, E-8079, ea } 05 

Jars, jelly, covered, Cecil, E 8079, ea. . 1.45 
Jars, marmalade, covered, E- 8079. ea. . 2 . 30 
Jugs, Clayton, nursery rhyme, E-1441, 

ea jYn 

Jugs, Clavton, E-4090, ea 110 

Jugs, Daly, E-8079, ea 1 • ^ 

Mugs, Rex, E-1441. ea 53 

Mugs, Rex, E-4090, ea 54 

Pitchers, cream, Rheims, E-8079, ea. . . .41 

Pitchers, cream, Milner. E-8079, ea 1 .25 

Pots, tea, Rheims, E-8079, ea 1 .65 

Stands, hatpin. E-8079, ea 1 00 

Sweets, E-8079, ea »« 

Sweets, E-8079, ea 93 

Tidies, hair, E-S079, ea 99 



Postal Address of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is. "The Panama Canal, 
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone,' 
Canal, Washington, D. C." 



"The Panama 



Route Service Jitney— Oris tobal-Mt. Hope. 

The following is the schedule of the official jitney service between 
the Terminal building at Cristobal and Mount Hope. Cars stop at 
the office of the Commissary Division each way: 

Leave Terminal Building. Leave Mount Hope. 

A.M. P.M. A.M. P-Mj 

8.00 12.30 8.15 12.45 

8.30 1.00 8.45 1.15 

9.00 1.30 9.15 1-45 

9.30 2.00 9.45 2.15 

10.00 2.30 J0.15 2.45 

10.30 3.00 10.45 3.15 

3.30 3 - 45 

Cable Address of The Panama Canal. Do „ otT10 .» in th . 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal. Panama, in the 

^B&tt^tlSSfK^ or touching at either of the terminal ports Bhould be 
addressed to "Cristobal, Canal Zone." 



194 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Rates at Hotel Aspinwall, Taboga. 

The following are the current rates at the Aspinwall : 

Employees: Dinner, lodging, and breakfast $2.00 

Employees per day . . 2 . 75 

Children under 12 years of age per day. . 1 .25 

Servants of employees per day . . 1.50 

Employees for stay of 7 days per day . . 2 . Of) 

Reduction of 10 per cent on above rates for stay of 30 days. Reduction of 
10 per cent for families of four or more for over 7 days' stay. 

Nonemployees per day . . 3 . 50 

Children of nonemployees (under 12 years of age) per day. . 1 .50 

Servants of nonemployees per day . . 1.75 

Meals: 

Breakfast 1 . 00 

Luncheon 1 . 25 

Dinner 1 . 25 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Fruit Cake. 

Fruit cakes are now being sold in the line commissaries and orders will also be 
accepted tor Christmas and the holidays. 



Handkerchiefs. 

Ladies' embroidered handkerchiefs, in both linen and cotton, in a wide range of 
patterns and prices, and Jap silk handkerchiefs in fancy printed designs are now 
in stock in the line stores. A supply of men's linen and cotton handkerchiefs was 
also received and forwarded to the line commissaries. 



Hosiery. 

It is very hard to obtain clocked and fancy hosiery of any description as the 
manufacturers are reluctant to accept such orders. They have little difficulty 
selling all of the plain goods they can make and see no reason to retard deliveries by 
sending hose to be clocked or to reduce production by turning out a variety of styles. 



Feather Pillows Laundered. 

The laundries at Ancon and Cristobal are prepared to wash, sterilize, and dry feather 
pillows. This should be of considerable interest to commissary patrons as the 
method used separates the feathers, restores their fluffiness, and practically renews 
the pillows. The price for this service is 25 cents. 



Ladies' Hats. 

A shipment of a popular brand of ladies' sailor hats in a number of different straws 
and a good range of colors has recently been received by the Commissary Division 
and will be placed on sale at Ancon, Balboa, Cristobal, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel com- 
missaries on Mondav, December 1. They are of the season's latest models and are 
attractively priced at S3. 20, $4.10, $4.80, and $6.45. 



Japanese Goods. 

Another shipment of Japanese goods has been received by the Commissary Divi- 
sion and forwarded to the line stores. This consists in part of white ivory beads — 
hand carved, plain, and in combinations of plain and carved; children's Japanese 
paper and silk parasols; ladies' congee silk embroidered parasols, two-tone silk em- 
broidered parasols, and parasols of silk lined with contrasting color; fans both large 
and small, of sandalwood and silk, hand embroidered of carved white bone and silk, 
hand embroidered, and of painted silks; men's natural color pongee silk pajamas; 
men's terry cloth kimono style robes, striped and figured, trimmed with contrasting 
colors; ladies' plain color cotton crepe kimonos, in assorted colors; an extensive selec- 
tion of ladies' silk handbags, in practically every popular color; pink and white Kabi 
silk crepe, pink and white Habutai silk, and natural color pongee silk; and Akebi 
hand baskets, in a variety of sizes and styles. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 195 

Directory of The Panama Canal. 



Executive Department. 

Headquarters, Balboa Heights. 

Colonel Chester Harding, U. S. A., Governor. 

M. B. Stevens, Secretary. 

C. A. McIlvaine, Executive Secretary. 

John H. Smith, Chief Clerk, Executive Office. 

Guy Johannes, Chief, Police and Fire Division. 

Crede H. Calhoun, Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 

A. R. Lang, Superintendent, Division of Schools. 

T. S. Booz, General Secretary, Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds. 
Frank Feuille, Special Attorney, Ancon. 

Walter F. Van Dame, Assistant to the Special Attorney and Land Agent, 
Ancon. 
Albert C. Hindman, District Attorney, Ancon. 



Department ol Operation and Maintenance. 

(Under immediate direction of the Governor as Head of the Department.) 
Headquarters, Balboa Heights. 

Lt.-Col. J. J. Morrow, U. S. A., Engineer of Maintenance. 
W. L. Hersh, Electrical Engineer, Electrical Division. 
W. R. Holloway, Superintendent, Pacific Locks, Pedro Miguel. 

E. D. Stillwell, Superintendent, Gatun Locks, Gatun. 

C. J. Embree, Office Engineer. 

O. E. Malsbury, Assistant Engineer, Section of Surveys. 

R. Z. Kirkpatrick, Chief Hydrographer, Section of Meteorology and Hydrography. 

D. E. Wright, Municipal Engineer, Division of Municipal Engineering. 
Joel M. Pratt, Superintendent, Dredging Division, Paraiso. 

John G. Claybourn, Assistant Engineer, Dredging Division, Paraiso. 

F. E. Holleran, Assistant Engineer, Fortifications Division,, Balboa Heights. 
T. C. Morris, Resident Engineer, Building Division. 

Samuel M. Hitt, Architect. . . 

Capt. Leonard R. Sargent, U. S. N., Marine Superintendent, Marine Division. 
Lieut. Com. J. G. Fei.s, U. S. N. R. F., Captain of the Port, Cristobal. 
Lieut Com. Chas. Svensson, U. S. N. R. F., Captain of the Port, Balboa. 
Board of Local Inspectors— Lieut. Com. J. G. Fels, U. S. N. R. F., Chairman, 

Lieut. Com. Chas. Svensson, U. S. N. R. F., and Lieut. M. C. Davis, U. S. N. 

George J. Vanderslice, Reorder. 
F. Kariger, Pilot in charge, Lighthouse Subdivision, Gatun. 
Comdr. Edwin G. Kintner, Naval Constructor, U. S. N., Superintendent of Mechan- 
ical Division, Balboa. 

, Mechanical Engineer, Mechanical Division, Balboa. 

Wm. H. Stone, General Foreman, Cristobal Shops, Cristobal. 



Supply Department. 

Headquarters, Balboa Heights. 

R. K. Morris, Chief Quartermaster. 
Roy R. Watson, Superintendent. 

J. J. Jackson, General Manager, Commissary Division, Cristobal. 
M. D. Smith, General Storekeeper, Balboa. 
W. B. Brown, Superintendent, Cattle Industry, Cristobal. 

B. C. Poole, District Quartermaster, Ancon-Balboa, Balboa Heights. 
J. M. King, District Quartermaster, Cristobal. 

Stanley Ford, District Quartermaster, Gatun. 

C. Peters, District Quartermaster, Pedro Miguel. 



Accounting Department. 

Headquarters, Balboa Heights. 

H. A. A. Smith, Auditor. 

Elwyn Greene, Assistant Auditor on the Isthmus. 
R. W. Glaw, Paymaster. 
T. L. Clear, Collector. 



196 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Health Department. 

Headquarters, Balboa Heights. 
Col. H. C. Fisher, U. S. A., Chief Health Officer. 

Dr. Dalferes P. Curry, Assistant Chief Health Officer. 

Surgeon S. B. Grubbs, U. S. P. H. S., Chief Quarantine Officer. 

Col. L. T. Hess, U. S. A., Superintendent, Ancon Hospital, Ancon. 

Lt.-Col. Guy L. Qualls, U. S. A., Superintendent, Colon Hospital, Cristobal. 

Dr. Louis Wender, Superintendent, Corozal Hospital, Corozal. 

Maj. E. A. Bocock, Superintendent, Santo Tomas Hospital (Panama), Ancon. 

Dr. Henry Goldthwaite, Health Officer of Panama, Ancon. 

Dr. Jesse L. Byrd, Health Officer of Cristobal-Colon, Cristobal. 



Courts. 

John W. Hanan, District Judge, Ancon. 
Miguel A. Otero, Marshal, Ancon. 

E. M. Goolsby, Clerk, Ancon. 

Wm. B. Cheatham, Clerk, Cristobal. 
J. W. Blackburn, Magistrate, Balboa. 
John W. Thompson, Magistrate, Cristobal. 



The Panama Canal in the United States. 

Headqaarters, Washington, D. C. 

A. L. Flint, General Purchasing Officer and Chief of Office, Washington, D. C. 
E. D. Anderson, Chief Clerk, Purchasing Department, Washington, D. C. 
Ray L. Smith, Assistant to the Chief of Office, Washington, D. C. l 
B. F. Harrah, Assistant Auditor, Washington, D. C. 
R. E. Rutherford, Assistant Purchasing Agent, 24 State Street, New York, 

N. Y. 
A. S. Perry, Assistant Purchasing Agent, New Orleans, La. 
W. A. E. Doving, Inspecting Engineer, Washington, D. C. 



Panama Railroad Company. 

Col. Chester Harding, U. S. A., President, Balboa Heights. 

Lt.-Col. J. J. Morrow, U. S. A., Second Vice President, Balboa Heights. 
Samuel W. Heald, Superintendent, Balboa Heights. 

Robert Beverley, Assistant to Superintendent, Balboa Heights. 

W. F. Foster, Master of Transportation, Balboa Heights. 

M. B. Connolly, Roadmaster, Balboa Heights. 

R. B. Walker, Receiving and Forwarding Agent, Cristobal. 

T. W. McFarlane, Superintendent, Coaling Plants, Cristobal. 
Frank Feuille, Counsel, Ancon. 

Walter F. Van Dame, Assistant to the Counsel and Land Agent, Ancon. 



Office in the United States, 24 State Street, New York City. 
E. A. Drake, First Vice President, New York, N. Y. 
Sylvester Deming, Treasurer, New York. 

T. H. Rossbottom, Secretary, and Assistant to Vice President, New York. 
V. M. Newton, Auditor, New York. 
Richard Reid Rogers, General Counsel, New York. 
A. E. Paterson, Freight Agent, New York. 
C. C. Van Riper, Passenger Agent, New York. 
H. I. Bawden, Terminal Superintendent, New York. 
R. E. Rutherford, Commissary Purchasing Agent, New York. 
A. S. Perry, Assistant Commissary Purchasing Agent, New Orleans, La. 



Joint Commission. 
Hon. Manuel Walls y Merino, Umpire, Panama City, and Ancon. 
Federico Boyd, Member, Panama City. 
George A. Connolly, Member, Ancon. 
Julio J. Fabrega, Member, Panama City. 
Burt New, Member, Ancon. 

Miss Genella Bliss, Secretary. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, SI. 00 per year foreign, .$1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIJT. Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 3, 1919. No. 16. 



LINES THROUGH THE CANAL. 



Services in Fairly Regular Operation over the Great Trade Routes. 

The following is a summary of the principal regular, or fairly regular, 
services through the Canal at present. War and post-war conditions 
have affected the regularity of the sailings, and with the release of more 
ships from government service new developments are taking place all 
the time. This summary endeavors to present the best approximation 
of present services: 

From the Atlantic terminus to South and Central America — The 
Pacific Steam Navigation Company has services from Cristobal to 
west coast ports as far south as Valparaiso and Coronel and as far 
north as Champerico, calling at the principal wayports. Sailings 
for the Central American ports to the north are monthly. Sailings 
for Tumaco and Ecuadorian ports, as far as Guayaquil, are every 
few days: sailings to Valparaiso via Chilean and Peruvian ports are 
fortnightly; and a service between Cristobal and Buenaventura and 
Tumaco has a sailing every three weeks. 

The Compafiia Sud-Americana de Vapores (South American Steam- 
ship Co.). (Chilean Line), maintains practically a weekly service 
between Cristobal and Valparaiso, calling at all important Peruvian 
and Chilean ports. This company has just purchased an additional 
5,000-ton steamer which should be in this service during January. 

The Peruvian Steamship and Dock ComDany of Callao ("Peruvian 
Line) maintains a service between Cristobal and Peruvian ports, 
going as far south as Mollendo and making its principal calls on the 
way at Paita, Eton. Pacasmayc, Salaverry, Callao, and southern ports. 
The line has sailings each way once a week. 

The Pacific Metals Corporation operates a motor schooner between 
Cristobal and Buenaventura, Colombia, carrying cargo, making round 
voyages approximately twice a month. 

The Colombian Maritime Steamship Company, Limited, operates a 
vessel in regular service between Cristobal and Buenaventura and 
Tumaco, making about two round voyages a month. 

All of the lines named above, except the Pacific Metals Corporation, 
carry both passengers and cargo. 

From the Atlantic terminus to Central and North America — The 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company is operating a line between Cristobal 
and San Francisco, with a sailing each way about every 15 days. 
Calls are made at ports of Central America and Mexico on the way, 
and passengers are carried. 

From the Atlantic Coast of the United States to the Pacific Coast of 
South America — Many of the vessels plying over this route are in the 
petroleum or the nitrate trade and used exclusively by charterers; 
the following commercial lines maintain fairly regular services: 



198 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

The Merchants' Line, operated by W. R. Grace and Company, plies 
between New York and ports of Ecuador, Peru, and Chile, with a 
sailing each way about every week, with calls at Buenaventura as 
cargo justifies. 

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company has recently inaugurated a 
passenger and cargo service between New York and Valparaiso, calling 
at Callao, Mollendo, Arica, Iquique, and Antofagasta each way. The 
service is approximately fortnightly in both directions. 

The United States Steel Products Company operates the New York 
and South America Line between New York and the west coast, as far 
south as Valparaiso, with a sailing each way about every third week. 

The New Orleans and South America Steamship Company operates a 
monthly service from New Orleans to Ecuadorian, Peruvian, and Chil- 
ean ports. This service is in addition to a service from New Orleans 
to Cristobal, via Habana and Porto Rican ports, Trinidad, and Guade- 
loupe. 

The Grace Line operates two passenger-carrying ships between New 
York and Peruvian and Chilean ports. Sailings are about every 20 
days; with the addition of three new ships, a fortnightly service is to 
be established. 

The West Coast Line (Wessels, Duval, and Company), plies between 
New York and Chile and Peru, with a vessel going each way about 
every third week. 

The Merchants' Line, the United States Steel Products Company's 
Line, and the West Coast Line carry cargo only. The others named 
in this section carry both passengers and cargo. 

From Europe to the Pacific Coast of South America — The East Asiatic 
Company has a line from Copenhagen, by way of Gothenburg and 
Christiania, to Valparaiso and intermediate ports, operating on a 
fortnightly schedule. Passengers are carried. 

The Johnson Line plies between Swedish and other Scandinavian 
ports and the west coast, as far as Valparaiso, with a sailing each 
way about every 60 days. Passengers are carried. 

The vessels of the Nautilus Steam Shipping Company (the old Gulf 
Line) sailing from Great Britain to the west coast of South America 
via the Strait of Magellan, and returning up the coast, make the home 
voyage through the Canal. The service has cargo steamers, monthly. 

The Royal Dutch West India Mail Steamship Company has approxi- 
mately a monthly service from Rotterdam to the west coast of South 
America and return. The ships handle cargo only. 

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company has practically a weekly 
sailing from Great Britain to Peru and Chile; and vice versa, both 
via the Panama Canal and Straits of Magellan, the larger steamers 
using the lattei route only. 

Beginning in January, 1920, the Compagnie Generale Transatlan- 
tique (French Line) is to operate a monthly freight service between 
Havre and Valparaiso, via Ecuadorian, Peruvian, and Chilean ports. 

The La Veloce Navigazione Italiana a Vapore ("La Veloce" Line) 
has a line from Genoa, Italy, to Valparaiso, calling at Marseilles, 
Barcelona, Tenerife, Barbados, Trinidad, Venezuela, Curasao, 
Colombian ports, Port Limcn, Cristobal, and Ecuadorian, Peruvian, 
and Chilean ports each way, with a sailing every 60 days. Passen- 
gers and cargo are carried. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 199 

The transfer service at the Atlantic terminus of the Canal, referred 
to in the first section of this article, cares for a large part of European 
shipments through the Canal to the west coast of South America. 

From Europe to the west coast of North America — The East Asiatic 
Company has a service between Scandinavian ports and San Francisco, 
operating a vessel each way about every fourth week. The ships carry 
passengers. 

The Johnson Line has a service over this route, primarily between 
Sweden and San Francisco, with a vessel each way about every 60 days, 
with passengers. 

The Norway- Pacific Line operates motor vessels, carrying a few 
passengers, between Scandinavian ports and the Pacific Coast of the 
United States. 

The Harrison-Direct Line has a service between Great Britain and 
the west coast as far as Puget Sound, with a vessel each way approxi- 
mately every sixth week. These are cargo ships. 

The Maple Leaf Line plies from New York to Vancouver, to return 
to Europe by way of California ports and Santa Rosalia. Ships of this 
line are scheduled to sail every five weeks. They do not carry pas- 
sengers. 

From the Atlantic Coast oj the United States to Japan, Siberia, China, 
and the Philippine Islands — The movements of vessels over this trade 
route have not been regular, as most of the ships load and clear as cargo 
offers and do not attempt a fixed schedule. The tendency to this 
practice is fostered by the length of the voyage and a general uncer- 
tainty as to the return voyage, with what cargo and by what route. 

The principal lines operating in this service are the American and 
Oriental Line, the Barber Line, Shewan Tomes and Company, and 
Alfred Holt and Company, sending out a vessel, among them, about 
once every 10 days from New York; the American and Manchurian 
Line (Ellerman and Bucknall), about once in three weeks; the Nippon 
Yusen Kabushiki Kaisha, approximately semimonthly in each di- 
rection; and ships operated by Norton, Lilly, and Company sail at 
irregular intervals, approximately once a month. 

The Osaka Shosen Kaisha has a line between Japan and New Orleans, 
via Cuba, with a ship in each direction every month. 

It may be noted here that the East Asiatic Company sends an oc- 
casional vessel to the Far East direct through the Canal; and at 
irregular times the vessels of the company return from the Far East 
to Denmark through the Panama Canal. 

The Panama Far East Line sends ships through the Canal, outward 
bound from New Orleans, Mobile, and other Gulf ports to Japan and 
will continue the service according to the availability of tonnage. 

The Toyo Kisen Kaisha started in November a service between 
New York and the Orient, via Cuba, the Canal, and San Francisco, 
with a ship each way every 60 days. 

The Prince Line uses the Canal for its service between the Far East 
and Boston and New York. Some of the ships have sailed to or from 
Vladivostok, others from Japan, others from Australia. The sailings 
are irregular, and passengers are not carried. 

From the Atlantic Coast oj the United States to Australia and New 
Zealand — The United States and Australia Line operates between 
New York and the ports of New Zealand and Australia, with a vessel 
out about every month. 



200 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

The Ellerman Lines have a service from New York to Australia 
and New Zealand, with irregular sailings. 

The Luckenbach line is operating a service to Australia and New 
Zealand, with irregular sailings. 

The Federal Steam Navigation Company has established a line be- 
tween New Zealand and New York, with a ship each way approxi- 
mately every six weeks. 

The American and Australian Line operates between New York 
and Australia, with a vessel each way about every 30 days. 

The Commonwealth and Dominion Line serves these trade areas, 
with a ship about every fourth week. 

The Stoomvarts Maatschappe Nederland, the Rotterdamsche 
Lloyd, and the Holland- American Line cooperate in a service between 
New York and Batavia, Surabaya, and Samarang. 

From Europe to Australia and New Zealand — -The New Zealand Ship- 
ping Company operates a line between New Zealand and Great Britain 
with possible way calls at Norfolk and New York. Sailings each way 
are every 28 days for mail boats, carrying passengers, with interme- 
diate sailings of cargo ships. 

The Commonwealth Government Line, operated by the Government 
of Australia, between Great Britain and Australia, via United States 
ports, has a large fleet of cargo and passenger steamers, with irregular 
sailings at present, averaging approximately a vessel outward every 
three weeks, returning by the Suez Canal or the Cape of Good Hope. 

The Federal Steam Navigation Company operates over the same 
route, with a ship each way about once a month. 

The Shaw, Savill and Albion Company, Limited, of London, has been 
sending all of its ships through the Canal on both the homeward and 
outward voyages between Great Britain and New Zealand. The service 
is irregular but is settling down to a mail and passenger steamer each 
way every month and a cargo vessel every two weeks. 

The Swedish East Asiatic Comoany has an irregular service be- 
tween Scandinavian ports and the Far East. 

United States coastwise trade— At the present time the regular service 
in the United States coastwise trade is only the service of the Pacific 
Mail Steamship Company between Baltimore and San Francisco, 
via Habana and Puerto Colombia on the Atlantic, and via Central 
American ports on the Pacific side, with a vessel each way every three 
weeks, carrying cargo only. 

CONNECTING LINES AT TERMINALS. 

In connection with the traffic through the Canal, important business 
is carried on in the transfer of cargo and passengers between connect- 
ing carriers at the terminals of the Canal, especially Cristobal, at the 
Atlantic end. The following are the lines which call regularly at 
the terminals either with or without passing through the Canal : 

The United Fruit Company operates a weekly service from New 
Orleans to Cristobal direct. These steamers return to New Orleans 
weekly, going via Bocas del Toro and Habana. This company 
operates a line from New York via Kingston to Cristobal, thence to 
Colombian ports, returning to Cristobal, sailing weekly to New York 
via Kingston. Also a line from New York via Habana to Cristobal, 
thence to Costa Rica, and direct to New York, sailing weekly. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



201 



The Panama Railroad Steamship Line maintains weekly sailings 
between New York and Cristobal, via Port au Prince, Haiti, carrying 
passengers and cargo, with supplementary sailings between New York 
and Cristobal direct, about every 10 days, of vessels carrying 
cargo only. A service is operated between Cristobal and Cartagena, 
Colombia, via Cispata, approximately weekly, carrying passengers and 
freight. A line handling coal to the coaling plants at Cristobal is 
operated from Norfolk, with sailings about fortnightly. 

The service of La Veloce Line, noted under the section on lines 
between Europe and the west coast of South America, makes stops 
at Cristobal. 

The Compania Trasatlantica de Barcelona (Spanish Line) has 
a monthly service, carrying passengers and cargo, from Barcelona 
to Cristobal via Malaga, Valencia, Cadiz, Santa Cruz, and Las Palmas 
in the Canary Islands, San Juan, Porto Rico, and Habana; returning 
via Puerto Colombia, Curacao, Puerto Cabello, La Guaira, San Juan, 
Porto Rico, Canary Islands, Cadiz, and Barcelona. 

The Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line) operates 
fortnightly service between Cristobal and Havre, Saint Nazaire, and 
Bordeaux, via ports of Colombia, Venezuela, Trinidad, and the French 
West Indies. Vessels carry both passengers and cargo. Services are 
now irregular, but it is expected, will be resumed punctually early in 
1920. 

The Leyland and Harrison Lines together maintain a service 
through Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico ports, coming out from Liver- 
pool and making the circuit according to the cargo which offers. A 
ship comes out approximately every month, and calls are normally 
made at Cristobal. 

Pacific terminal — -The Rolph Mail Steamship Company's vessels 
call at Balboa in the coasting service which they maintain between 
San Francisco and Chilean ports, with a vessel each way every two 
months. 

The Toyo Kisen Kaisha vessels in the service between the Orient and 
Valparaiso, via the West Coast, call at Balboa. The line runs from 
the Orient to San Francisco, thence via Salina Cruz and Balboa to 
Peruvian and Chilean ports, returning in reverse order, with a vessel 
every month in alternate directions. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending November 29, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 






November 24 . 
November 24 . 
November 25 . 
November 25 . 

November 2.">. 
November 25 . 
November 26. 
November 27 . 
November 27 . 


November 24 . 

In port 

November 25 . 
November 28. 
November 25. 
November 25. 
November 28. 
November 28 . 
November 29. 


Ton*. 
(*) 

12,006 
(*) 

706 

(*) 

2 

30 

4 

52 


Tout. 
4 




Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 

Pacific Metals Corporation 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company.. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

\V. U.Grace 




Laura 0. Hall 


40 
157 




13 




(t) 


Chile 


Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific'Steam Navigation Co 

United States Shipping Board 


(t) 




(t) 


Cripnle Creek 


(V 



No cargo discharged. 



tNo cargo laded. 



202 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending November 29, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Senator 

Orcus 

Tivives 

Aysen 

Fort Gaines 

Laura C. Hall 

Jamaica 

Puerto Rico 

Aoajutla 

The Lambs 

Colon 

Salvador 

Heredia 

Turrialba 

Zacapa 

Abangarez 

Chile 

Gen. 0. H. Ernst. 
Paul H. Harwood. 

Middlebury 

Manavi 

Volga 

Santa Leonora*. . . 

Ucayali 

Acuelo 



Line or charterer. 



Harrison Steamship Line 

United States Shipping Board 

United Fruit Company. ....._ 

South American Steamship Line. . . 
Caribbean Steamship Company . . . 

Pacific Metals Corporation 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

French Line 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United States Shipping Board 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 
Pan-Amer. Pet. and Transp. Co. . 
Panama Railroad Cattle Industry 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

United States Government 

Peruvian Steamship Line 

United States Shipping Board. . . 



Arrived. 



November 23 
November 24 



November 24. 
November 24 



November 25 
November 25 
November 26 
November 27 
November 27 



November 28 
November 28 
November 28 
November 29 
November 29 
November 29 



Departed. 



November 23 . 
November 25 . 
November 24 . 
November 24 . 
November 24 . 
November 25 . 
November 25. 
November 25. 
November 26. 
November 26 . 
November 26. 
November 26. 
November 27 
November 27 
November 27 
November 27 



November 28 



Cargo — 



Discharged Laded 



Tons. 



6,376 
101 



1,005 
8,248 



1,736 
289 



1 
1,820 



November 25. 



10,000 
500 
662 
295 
510 
2,678 



Tons. 

675 
(t) 
(t) 
954J 
193 
16 
7791 
200 
(t) 
(t) 

3,688 

1.091J 

70 

173 

280 

3 



3,484 



ffi 



*U. S. Army transport. 



t No cargo laded. 



Origin and Destination of Cargo Shipped through the Canal. 

During the four months from the beginning of the current fiscal 
year to the end of October, 2,629,861 tons of cargo have passed through 
the Canal. Of this 1,184,902 tons went from Atlantic to Pacific and 
1 ,444,949 from Pacific to Atlantic, the percentages of the two directions 
being approximately 45 and 55. A study has been made of the dis- 
tribution of this cargo, and of the net tonnage of the ships carrying it, 
over the principal trade routes. 

The heaviest movement of cargo has been from the Atlantic seaboard 
of the United States to the Far East, including Japan, China, and the 
Philippines. This has been 414,892 tons in the 4-month period, over 
15.7 per cent of all cargo passing through the Canal and 35 percent 
of the cargo from Atlantic to Pacific. 

The next in quantity of cargo has been the United States coastwise 
trade from Pacific to Atlantic, aggregating 398,667 tons, over 22 per 
cent of all Pacific-to-Atlantic movements and nearly 15.2 per cent of all 
cargo. Coastwise shipments from Atlantic to Pacific amounted to 
75,889 tons, about 6.4 per cent of all cargo handled from Atlantic to 
Pacific and 2.9 per cent of all cargo in both directions. 

The only other routing over which passed as much as 10 per cent of 
all the cargo was that from the west coast of North America to Europe. 
These shipments were principally lumber, grain, and flour. 

Shipments from Australia and New Zealand to Europe, principally 
Great Britain, were next in quantity, 229,954 tons, or 8.7 per cent of 
all cargo. 

Cargo from the United States to the west coast of South and Central 
America was next in order, 178,962 tons, 6.8 per cent of the grand total. 
Shipments from Europe direct to the west coast in the same time were 
41,984 tons, or 1.6 per cent. 

The traffic along the west coast has been divided into four classes: 
With the United States direct, with Europe direct, with Mexico, and to 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



203 



and from the Atlantic terminus of the Canal. There was also in the 
period 1 shipment to Cuba, of 1,502 tons. The aggregate shipments 
to the west coast from Atlantic ports were 408,868 tons, about 15.5 
per cent of all cargo, slightly less than the 414,892 tons passing from 
Atlantic ports of the United States to the Far East. Shipments from 
the west coast through the Canal, to all destinations, aggregated 
368,571 tons, 14 per cent of all cargo in the period. Shipments to the 
west coast from the United States, 178,962 tons, exceeded those from 
Europe, 41,984 tons, but from the west coast to Europe the cargo of 
165,121 tons exceeded by 42 per cent the 116,070 tons sent to the 
United States. From Mexico to the west coast the cargo was 139,000 
tons of petroleum products, most of the vessels returning to Mexico 
in ballast. Transfer shipments from Cristobal to the west coast of 
South and Central America totaled 48,922 tons in the period, and 
cargo arriving at Cristobal from the west coast for transshipment in 
the same time amounted to 85,978 tons. 

Details of the distribution of the traffic through the Canal in the 
4-month period are presented in the accompanying table: 







Panama 




Percent- 




Percent- 


Percent- 




Ves- 


Canal 


Cargo. 


age or 


Percent- 


age of 


age of 




sels. 


net 


net ton- 


age of 


all net 


all 






tonnage. 




nage. 




tonnage. 


cargo. 


Atlantic to Pacific. 


















11 


49,197 


75,889 


4.531 


6.405 


2.090 


2.885 


United States to Australia and New Zea- 


















23 

57 


127,342 
261,769 


137,862 
414,892 


11.734 
24.112 


11.635 
35.015 


5.411 
11.122 


5.242 


Dnited States to Far East 


15.776 


United States to west coast of South 




America 


51 


143,399 


17,8,962 


13.208 


15.103 


6.093 


6.805 


Cristobal to west coast, North America . 


9 


15,467 


13,810 


1 424 


1.165 


.657 


.525 


Cristobal to west coast. South America... 


69 


97,950 


48,922 


9.022 


4.129 


4.162 


1.860 


Europe to Australia and New Zealand . . . 


18 


123.769 


57,056 


11 400 


4.815 


5.259 


2.169 


Europe to west coast, North America. . . 


8 


32,896 


12,432 


3.030 


1.049 


1.398 


.473 


Europe to west coast, South America. . . 


23 


101,386 


41,984 


9.339 


3.543 


4.308 


1.596 


Mexico to west coast, North America. . . 


7 


31.618 


57,145 


2.912 


4.823 


1.343 


2.173 


Mexico to west coast. South America . . . 


16 


84,162 


139,000 


7,794 


11,731 


3,576 


5,285 




9 


6,911 




.636 




.294 






6 


9,764 


6,948 


.899 


.586 


.415 


/ .264 






Total 


300 


1,085,630 


1,184,902 


100.000 


100 000 


46.128 


45.053 


Pacific to Atlantic. 
















United States coastwise 


81 


283,644 


398,667 


22.377 


27.590 


12.052 


15.159 


Australia and New Zealand to east coast. 














c 1 




3 
1 


14,295 
1,454 


18,182 
2,725 


1.127 
.115 


1.258 
.188 


.607 
.062 


.691 




.104 


Far East to east coast, United States. . . 


14 


62,046 


94,979 


4.895 


6.573 


2.636 


3.611 


West coast, South America to east coast 


















34 
37 


88,439 

243,231 


116,070 
229,954 


6.977 
19.188 


8.033 
15.914 


3.758 
10.335 


4.413 


Australia and New Zealand to Europe.. . 


8.744 




2 
30 


5,797 
115,025 


6,636 
165,121 


.457 
9.074 


.459 
11.427 


.246 

4.887 


.253 


West coast. South America to Europe, 


6.278 


West coast, North America to Europe. - 


97 


206,303 


290,321 


16 275 


20.092 


8.766 


11.039 


West coast, South America to Cristobal.. 


71 


101,428 


85,978 


8.002 


5.950 


4.309 


3.269 


West coast, North America to Cristobal. 


8 


13,889 


S.9M 


1.096 


.622 


.590 


.342 




15 


75 735 


(*) 


5 975 




3.218 






4 


23 067 


(*) 


1 819 




.980 






1 


1,502 


2,357 


.US 


.163 


.063 


.093 


West coast, North America to Cuba 


5 


B.156 


9 ssl 


.643 


.684 


.346 


.376 




9 


23,564 


15,091 


1.859 


1.044 


1.001 


.574 






Total 


412 


1,267,575 


1,444,949 


100.000 


I 100.000 


53,856 


54 . 946 






Grand total 


712 


2.353,205 


1 2,629,861 


1 





100.000 


100.000 



•Ballast. 



Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," or "The Panama 
Canal, Washington, D. C." 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama;" in the 
United States, "Pancanal, Wasnington." 

Mail for ships passing through the Canal or touching at either of the terminal ports should be 
addressed to "Cristobal, Canal Zone." 



204 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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206 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Shiploads of Canned Pineapples from Honolulu. 

Two whole cargoes of canned pineapples, shipped from Honolulu, 
have passed through the Canal this month. The first was 2,450 tons 
on the steamship Deva, bound for New York, and the second 4,619 
tons, on the Calvert, also bound for New York. In October there was 
1 whole cargo of canned pineapples, 3,115 tons, from Honolulu for 
Boston, on the steamship Glymont. 



Bond Conversion. 

The Liberty Loan Committee advises that blank forms to be filled 
out for the exchange and conversion of Liberty Bonds of the first and 
second issues will be ready for distribution during the coming week. 
The new bonds bearing the higher rate of interest and with all subse- 
quent coupons attached will not be ready for issue by the Treasury 
Department at Washington until after March 1, 1920. 

Appreciation of Courtesies to Troops. 

The Acting Prime Minister of New Zealand has transmitted through 
official channels thanks of the Dominion for the hospitality extended 
by the communities at the American ports at which drafts of New Zea- 
land troops have called. His letter follows: 

Dominion of New Zealand, Prime Minister's Office, 

Wellington, August 6, 1919. 

Dear Sir: Now that the demobilization of our Expeditionary Force is approaching 
completion, and the trooping period is drawing to a close, I wish to express on behalf 
of the Government and the people of the Dominion our deep gratefulness for the 
hospitality extended by the authorities and communities of the American ports at 
which drafts of our troops have called when en route to the front or returning to the 
Dominion. In this connection I may mention Newport News, Norfolk (Va.), Rich- 
mond and the Panama Canal Zone. In the case of the latter, I have had extreme 
pleasure in conveying through His Britanic Majesty's Consul, Colon, our heartfelt 
appreciation of the hospitality and courtesies extended to our troops when passing 
through the Canal by the authorities and American citizens, with a request that same 
might be fully conveyed to all concerned. 

I may say that the generosity and kindness of the communities mentioned to our 
troops has been deeply valued by them, and has been the subject of appreciative 
comment in the voyage reports of the drafts concerned. The most friendly receptions 
accorded, and kindness and courtesies extended to our soldiers have, very materially 
relieved the tedium of their long voyage from and to the Dominion, and the remem- 
brance of same will remain with our men long after their recollection of the rigors of 
active service has become dimmed by time. 

I shall, therefore, be grateful if you will kindly convey to the authorities and citizens 
of the cities indicated our heartfelt thanks and lasting gratitude. ^J 

We regret earnestly that no opportunity has occurred here during the war when we 
could have reciprocated somewhat the kindness of the American public to our boys, 
but, no doubt, some occasion will come to pass in the future when the opportunity 
will present itself to enable us to show our appreciation of the sailor sons of our great 
Ally, whose Naval Forces have played a gallant part in the "policing" of the seas, 
and ensuring safe transport for our troops. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) J. Allen, 

Acting Prime Minister. 
The Consul-General, 

United States of America, Auckland. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 207 

Whole Cargo of Sulphur. 

Six thousand nine hundred tons of sulphur made up the cargo of the 
steamship Mount Benvyn, passing through the Canal on November 2, 
on the way from Sabine, Texas, to Fremantle, Australia, by way of 
Adelaide. This is the first whole cargo of sulphur to have passed 
through the Canal. 

Increased Charges for Moving Pictures. 

The Governor has approved the following prices to be charged for 
moving pictures in the Panama Canal clubhouses, effective December 1 : 
Gold clubhouses — Children under 12 years of age, 10 cents; all others, 15 cents. 
Silver clubhouses — Children and adults, 10 cents. 

These increases are made on account of the increased prices which 
are being charged for films. 

Automobile and Motorcycle License Tags. 

Automobile and motorcycle license tags for 1920 for personal and 
commercial vehicles are now b'eing issued by the Division of Civil 
Affairs, room 301, Administration Building, Balboa Heights. The 
official automobile and motorcycle licenses in use at the present 
time need not be renewed. 

Annual license rates for residents of the Canal Zone are as follows: Automobile 
for personal use, $5; automobile for hire, 29-horsepower or under, $20; automobile 
for hire, over 29-horsepower, $30; truck or omnibus, over 3 tons, $40; motorcycle, 
$2. Residents of Panama or Colon (which includes Colon Beach and New Cristobal), 
must first obtain licenses from their respective municipalities and upon presentation 
of the proper receipts from Colon or Panama will be accorded the special reciprocal 
rates of $1 for automobiles for personal use and motorcycles; $12.50 for automobiles 
for hire; and $15 for trucks and omnibuses. Receipts must be presented covering 
the payment of fees for the current month to Colon or Panama before a reciprocal 
license can be renewed. 

When applying for 1920 licenses the applicant should be prepared to furnish the 
number of the 1919 Canal Zone license, or, in the case of a new car, the name of the 
car and its engine number as well as the free entry number under which the car was 
imported. If a license is desired in the name of a person other than the last owner of 
record in the license bureau, the applicant must present evidence of the transfer 
of ownership from the last licensee to himself. When a car which has been imported 
on a free entry is transferred to a nonemployee or is to be licensed as a commercial 
vehicle, the receipt for the payment of customs duties to the Government of Panama 
must be presented. 

Remittance for license fees should be drawn in favor of the Collector, The Panama 
Canal, and forwarded to the Division of Civil Affairs. The post-office address of the 
applicant should always be given. 

Hotel Aspinwall Launch Schedule. 

Following is the schedule of regular launch service between Balboa 
and the Hotel Aspinwall on Taboga Island : 

Daily. 

Leave Taboga 7 . 00 a. m. 

Leave Port Captain's boat landing, near dock 19 9.40 a. m. 

.Sundays and holidays. 

Leave dock 19, Balboa 9 . 40 a. m. 

Leave Taboga 1 1 . 00 a. m. 

Leave dock 19, Balboa 4 . 30 p. m. 

Leave Taboga 6 . 00 p. m. 

Saturdays and days preceding holidays. 

Leave Balboa 6 . 00 p. m. 

Leave dock 19, Balboa 9 . 40 a. m. 

Leave Taboga returning 1 1 . 00 a. m. 

Returning from Taboga the following day 7. 30 a. m. 

Fares {each way) — Employees, 35 cents; nonemployees, 60 cents; children of 
employees over 6 and under 12 years old, 25 cents; of nonemployees, 40 cents. 



208 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Class in Cooking. 

A night school class in cooking will be offered at the Balboa house- 
hold arts building on Mondays or Wednesdays from 7 to 9 p. m. for 
women of Balboa and Ancon, if there is a sufficient demand for the 
course. A tuition fee of $4 per month will be payable in advance. 
Those interested should advise the high school principal, telephone 
48, Balboa; post office, Balboa. 

Private Telephones. 

Notice was published in The Panama Canal Record of October 
29, 1919, that no applications for private telephones would be accepted 
until further notice, on account of exhausted stock of telephone 
instruments. 

The Electrical Division is now in receipt of a limited number of 
instruments, and applications for private telephones will be accepted. 
Applications should be made in writing to the Electrical Engineer, 
Balboa Heights, giving metal check number, post-office address, and 
house address. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Seivice Board, 
Balboa Heights (telephone 286). Age limits do not apply to persons entitled to 
prefeirm e because of military or naval service: 

Laboratory assistant (male); S5.20 and $6 a day; January 7 and 8, February 4 and 5, and March 
3 and 4. 1920; No. 2; form 1312; age, 20 years but not 35 years. 

Scientific assistant (male and female); $1,320 to SI, 620 a year; January 7 and 8, 1920; No. 3; 
form 1312; age, 20 years and over. 

I Associate physicist qualified in physical metallurgy (male); §2,000 to $2,800 a year; No. 1492- 
amended; form 1312; age, 22 years but not 45 years. t 

Assistant physicist qualified in physical metallurgy (male and female) ; $1,400 to $1,800 a year; No. 
1492-amended; form 1312; age, 22 years but not 45 years. t 

Investigator in marketing fruits and vegetables (male); $1,800 to $2,760 a year; No. 1985-supple- 
mental; closed November 18, 1919. 

Blue printer (male and female); $4.80 a day; No. 441-amended; supplemental. t 

Assistant biologist qualified in economic ornithology (male and female); $1,440 to $1,800 a year; 
January 7, 1920; No. 8; form 1312; age, under 45 years. 

Assistant for fishery food laboratory (male) ; $2,000 to $2,400 a year; December 25, 1919; No. 556; 
form 2118; ages, no limits.* 

Field and laboratory aid in plant nutrition (male and female); $1,200 a year ; January 7, 1920; No. 
9; form 1312; age 20 years but not 45 years. 

Inspector of gyroscopic compasses (male and female); $7.04 a day; December 23, 1919; No. 562; 
form 1312; age, 20 vearsand over.* 

Laboratory helper (male and female) ; $900 to $1,200 a year; December 23, 1919; No. 570; form 
1312; age, 1 8 years and over. * 

Mechanician qualified as scale repairer (male and female) ; $5 a day plus 10 per cent; December 16, 
1919; No. 563; form 1800; age, 18 years and over.* 

I Plant pathologist for small fruit disease investigations (male); $2,520 a year; December 23, 1919; 
No. 555; form 2118; age, 25 years but not 50 years.* 

Radio operator (male and female); $960 to $1,200 a year with $1 a day additional for subsistence; 
December 23, 1919; No. 507-amended; form 1312; age, 21 years but not 40 years.* 

Shot firer (male and female) ; $840 a year; December 23, 1919; No. 567; form 1800; age, 23 years 
but not 50 years.* 

Specialist in land-grant college statistics (male) ; $1,800 a year; December 16, 1919; No. 554; form 
2118; age, under 50 years.* 

Stacker operator (male and female); $1,440 a year; December 23, 1919; No. 564; form 1312; 
age, over 20 years.* 

Superintendent of forest pathological field station (male and female) ; $1,440 to $1,620 a year; Janu- 
ary 7, 1920; No. 7; form 1312; age, 21 years but not 45 years. 

Graphotype operator (male and female); $660 to $1,200 a year; December 14, 1919, and January 
11,1920; No. 63-amended; form 304; age, 18 years and over. 

F-l addressograph operator (male and female) ; $900 to $1,200 a year; December 14, 1919, and Janu- 
ary 11, 1920; No. 63-amended; form 304; age, 18 years and over. 

Automatic 3 Addressograph operator (male and female); $1,200 to $1,600 a year; December 14. 
1919, and January 11, 1920; No. 63-amended; form 304; age, 18 years and over. 

I Mimeograph operator (ma!e and female) ; $720 to $1,200 a year; December 14, 1919, and January 
11,1920; No. 63-amended; form 304; age, 18 years and over. 

^ Proof reader (male and female) ; $900 to $1,200 a year; December 14, 1919, and January 11, 1920; 
No. 63-amended; form 304; age, 18 years and over. 

Junior gas chemist (male and female); $1, 500a year; December 30, 1919; form 1312; age. under 40 
years.* 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



209 



Structural steel inspector (male and female); $7.04aday; December 23, 1919; No. 566; forml312; 
age, 25 years and over.* 



♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business on 
that date. 

tNonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 



Deceased Employee. 

The estate of the following deceased employee of The Panama Canal i? now in process of settle- 
ment, and any claims against this estate, or any information which might lead to the location of heirs, 
or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings or postal money order deposits, or any 
other moneys due him, should be presented at the office ol the Ailministrator of Estates at once in 
order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All claims should be itemized sworn to 
before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and submitted in duplicate. This name 
will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by- 


Date of death. 




26938 




Colon 


Mechanical Division .... 


November 18, 1919. 







Schedule of Official Jitney Service. 

Following is the schedule of the official jitney plying between bdlboa 
shops and the Ancon police station, carrying employee', in the 
conduct of official business, upon presentation of passes issued by the 
Chief Quartermaster, or of the "special pass" issued by the Governor: 

FROM ANCON POLICE STATION TO BALBOA SHOPS. 

Police Station Leave on the hour and half hour. 

Administration Building Leave 7 minutes and 37 minutes after tne hour 

Balboa Commissary Leave 10 minutes and 40 minutes affr the hour 

Balboa Shops Arrive 15 minutes and 45 minutes after the hout 

FROM BALBOA SHOPS TO ANCON POLICE STATION. 

Balboa Shops L«*ave 15 minutes and 45 minutes after the houi 

Port Captain's Office Leave 18 minutes and 45 minutes after the hour 

Balboa Commissary Leave 20 minutes and 50 minutes after the hour. 

Administration Building Leave 25 minutes and 55 minutes after th" how 

Ancon Police Station Arrive on the hour and half hour 



Official Circulars. 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal. 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 28, 1919. 
Circular No. 220: 

Effective November 24, 1919, Mr. L. A. Hel- 
likson is designated an accountable official of the 
Marine Division, and as such will account for 
all nonexpendable property in use by the Cap- 
tain of the Port, Balboa. 

II. A. A. Smith, 
Approved: Auditor, The Panama Canal. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Port Transportation Officer, Cristobal, together 
with two copies of Panama Railroad bill of lading 
and one copy of Customs clearance not later 
than noon of the day before the sailing date of the 
transport on which the freight is to be shipped. 
C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Employees' Freight Shipments on Trans- 
ports. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 28, 1919. 

To all concerned — The Department Transporta- 
tion Officer at Ancon advises that in the past 
considerable annoyance has been experienced on 
account of employees waiting until shortly 
before sailing time to attend to their freight ship- 
ments on Army transports, and it is requested that 
in the future all such shipments be handled in 
accordance with the following procedure. 

Whenever employees of The Panama Canal or 
Panama Railroad have been authorized by the 
Trans portationOtficer, Panama Canal Department, 
Ancon. to ship freight from the Isthmus to the 
United States on Army transports on which they 
intend to travel, it is necessary that such freight 
shipments be delivered to Capt. D. L. Decker, 



Transportation of Army and Navy Laborers 
on Fort Randolph Trains. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 28, 1919. 
Circular No. 1128: 

To conductors — Army and Navy laborers will 
be carried without transportation in the second- 
class labor coach on Fort P.andolph trains Nos. 
51 and 58 on presentation of identification card 
giving the laborer's name and stating that the 
bearer is entitled to a round-trip between Cris- 
tobal and Fort Randolph once each day and 
only on trains Nos. 51 and 58. 

W. F. Foster, 
Master of Transportation. 



Joint Commission. 



Award. 

In the matter of the claim of Dolores Icazarde 
Arias, for properly designuied as Punta Mala, 
award No. 209, in docket No. 1470, November 
25, 1919 — An award is hereby made against the 
United States of America in the sum of SI. 479. 53, 
United States currency, together with interest 
thereon at the rate of 6 per centum per annum 
from December 5, 1912, until payment or tender 



210 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



of payment of this award is made, for all right, 
title, and interest that Dolores Icaza de Arias, 
or Alberto B. de Obarrio, or Elisa A. de Diaz, 
or Isabel Diaz de Jimenez, or Domingo Diaz A., 
or any other person or persons, may possess or 
may have possessed in or to 5,479 1 square meters 
of the Punta Mala estate described in claim 
docket No. 1470, which portion was excluded from 
consideration at the time the claim for the Punta 
Mala tract, docket No. 1470, was tried, this award 
to include any and all damages sustained by the 
owner or owners of this property on account of 
the expropriation thereof by the United States 
of America. 

It being made to appear to the Joint Commis- 
sion that there is an action pending and undeter- 
mined in the District Court of the Canal Zone, 
Balboa Division, involving the respective claims 
of the said Dolores Icaza de Arias, and of Alberto 
B. de Obarrio, Elisa A. de Diaz, Isabel Diaz de 
Jimenez, and Domingo Diaz A., in and to the 
lands involved herein, or the value thereof, the 
amount of this award is hereby ordered to be 
deposited in the District Court of the Canal Zone, 
Balboa Division, to await the determination of 
that court as to its disposition. 

Jorge E. Boyd, Burt New, George A. Con- 
nolly, R. J. Alfaro, Commissioners. 



electric; 1 lathe, electric: 1 sterilizer, electric. 
A complete list of all items for sale and form of 
proposal may be had upon application to the 
office of the Chief Quartermaster. The Panama 
Canal reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 



Misdirected Letters. 



Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 1, 1919. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters 
have been received in the office of the Director 
of Posts, and may be obtained upon request of 
the addressees. Request may be made by tele- 
phone, calling No. 182, Balboa: 
Anderson, J., Box 237 Mangnall, John N. 

Miller, Capt. Sterling P. 
Montgomery, Miss Mar- 
garet 
Revit, Mrs. V. B. 
Sterling, Mrs. G. H. 
Sturges," Mrs. M. L., Box 

634 
Swanson, Frank 
Whitney, C. Dayton, Box 
507 



Batte, Leonard 
Blanchard, Leo 
Bowman, S. S. 
Crawford, Jesse F. 
Davis. H. A. 
Deelille, William R. 
Delavergne, Miss A. M. 
Drake, Henry 
Hensan, C. P. 
Herlihy, Mrs. G. H. 



Howard, Capt. G.'E. L. Wiseman, Samuel C. L. 
McKinney, Mrs. G. L. 



Sale of Twelve Second-hand Wicker Parlor 
Car Chairs. 

Sealed bids will be received in the office of the 
Chief Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, Balboa 
Heights, up to 10 a. m., December 10, 1919, and 
then opened, for the purchase of the above-men- 
tioned chairs. Detailed information and form 
of proposal may be had upon application to the 
office of the Chief Quartermaster. The Panama 
Canal reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 



Sale of Dental Equipment Formerly Used in 
Canal Dental Office over Ancon Dispensary. 

Sealed bids will be received in the office of the 
Chief Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, Bal- 
boa Heights, up to 10 a. m., December 11, 1919, 
and then opened , for the purchase of a complete 
dental set located at Ancon dispensary. A few 
of the more important items are as follows: 1 
bench, dental; 1 cabinet, instrument; 1 chair, 
dental, "Diamond;" 1 compressor, air, elec- 
tric, with tank; 1 cuspidor, fountain; 1 engine, 



Current Prices on Coal, Fuel Oil, and Beet. 

Coal is being supplied to steamships, including 
warships of all nations, delivered and trimmed 
in bunkers, at $13.50 per ton of 2,240 pounds at 
Cristobal and $15.50 at Balboa. For ships in 
transit through the Canal, which are directed to 
take coal at Balboa, for the convenience of The 
Panama Canal. $13.50 per ton at Balboa. For 
ships taking less than carload lots from plants or 
less than 25 tons from lighters, the price ie $15 
per ton at Cristobal, $17 at Balboa. 

Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either 
Cristobal or Balboa for $1.50 per barrel of 42 
gallons. 

Diesel oil is not sold by The Panama Canal, 
but may be obtained from private concerns at 
approximately $3 per barrel. Cable arrange- 
ment should be made in advance of arrival of 
vessel. 

The following are current prices on fresh beef 
sold from the cold storage plant of the Canal. 
Prices quoted are United States currency, per 
pound net: 

Beef hinds, 19 cents; beef fores, 14 cents; 
beef ribs, entire set, 20 cents; short loins, 25 
cents. This beef is from Colombian cattle, 
slaughtered on the Isthmus. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Dry Goods Section. 

Blouses, middy, ea $2.80 

Boxes, soap, ea 23 

Brushes, nail, ea 10 

Chemise, envelope, ea 4.00 

Chemise, envelope, ea 1 .30 

Chemise, envelope, ea 1 .50 

Kimonos, crepe, cotton, plain, ea 1.95 

Kimonos, cloth, embroidered cotton terry, 

ea 3.10 

Kimonos, cloth, plain cotton terry, ea 3 . 30 

Nightgowns, ladies', ea 4 . 35 

N ightgowns, ladies', ea 2 . 70 

Nightgowns, ladies', ea 4.00 

Sheeting, rubber, white, double coated, 27", 

yd 67 

Skirts, children's, ea 2 . 50 

Skirts, children's, ea 2 . 20 

Soap, nursery, Williams's, cake 09 

Soap, oatmeal, Williams's, cake 13 

Soap, Jersey cream, Williams's, cake 13 

Soap, pine tar, Williams's, cake 11 

Soap, lilac, Williams's, cake 09 

Soap, sandalwood, Williams's, cake 09 

Soap, English lilac, Williams's, cake 14 

Soap, cucumber cream, Williams's, cake... .11 

Soap, almond flower, Williams's, cake 11 

Soap, Dream Rose, Williams's, cake 09 

Soap, Carnation, Williams's, cake 09 

Soap, honey, Williams's, cake 11 

Soap, violet, glycerine, cake 09 

Soap, sulphur, Jergen's, cake 09 

Soap, carbolic, cake 09 

Stationery: 

Albums, post card, ea 38 

Books, memo., ea 15 

Books, memo. No. 3, ea 04 

Envelopes, pkg 03 

Sticks, walking, ea .67 

Vaseline, jar 0i 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Cigars. 

Jamaican cigars, in special gift boxes for the Christmas trade, are now obtainable 
in the line stores. 

Beds and Bed Springs. 

Double beds and springs, which have been out of stock for some time, are again 
obtainable in the line commissaries. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 211 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Porch Shades. 

A shipment of ventilating porch shades, in two sizes, at $5.15 and $6.85, has 
recently been received and forwarded to the line stores. 



Chinaware. 

Notice of another slight increase in price has been received from the manufacturers 
of Minton chinaware. 



Crash Shortage. 

The textile company from which the Commissary Division purchases a large quan- 
tity of crash has written that it will not be possible to fill our orders for some time. 
Their mills have a capacity of about 75,000 pieces per annum but prevailing conditions 
have reduced their output greatly and they can not supply any material for the 
Canal Zone for several months to come. 



Hand Bags. 

The Commissary Division has recently received and distributed to the line stores a 
shipment of leather hand bags. These range in prices from $1.35 to $4 and although 
the majority of them are of black leather, there are some of blue, gray, tan, and 
brown. All are silk lined, some being fitted with small mirrors. They are very good 
values and are meeting with ready sale. 



Ladies' Blouses. 

Another shipment of georgette and crepe de chine blouses, including some of the 
latest models, has been received by the Commissary Division. These comprise blue, 
gray, white, and flesh georgette blouses, some elaborately beaded, some embroidered, 
and others trimmed with lace edged frills, at $7.45, and tailored crepe de chine, 
embroidered crepe de chine, and georgette blouses in white and flesh, at $6.30. 

Candy. 

According to a letter recently received from the commissary purchasing agent, 
chocolate cream cakes now on order can not be supplied at present, the manufacturers 
advising that due to the Federal sugar regulations they have discontinued the 
manufacture of this candy. Shipments will be resumed, however, when they again 
manufacture them. There will also be some delay in the shipments of milk chocolate 
now on order. 

Leather Novelties. 

In a shipment of leather goods recently received by the Commissary Division 
were men's black leather tourist cases, leather lined, fitted with comb, brush, tooth- 
brush holder, etc., at $5.35; women's black leather tourist cases, leather lined, with 
the usual fittings, at $6.05 ; and black leather portfolios, fitted with calendar, writing 
pad, and small memorandum book, at $2. Any of the above would make desirable 
Christmas gifts. 

Books. 

Shipments of books for the Christmas trade have been made to the line commis- 
saries. Included in these consignments were gift books of almost every description 
and a wide range of children's books. 

Books received: 

"The Moon and Sixpence," by W. Somerset Maughm; "Ramsey Milholland," by Booth Tarkington; 
"The Inheritors," by Joseph Conrad and Ford M. Hueffer (leather edition); "The Young Visiters," by 
Daisy Ashford; "Tales of Fishes," by Zane Grey; "Ireland's Fight for Freedom," by George Creel; 
"The Squire's Daughter" and "The Eldest Son," by Archibald Marshall; "Opportunities in the News- 
paper Business," by James Melvin Lee; "A Tramp Abroad" and "Huckleberry Finn," by Mark Twain; 
"An American Idyll," by Cornelia Stratton Parker; Kipling's Prose Works; "The Passionate Pilgrim," 
by Samuel Merwin; "Poems," bv Maurice Maeterlinck; "A Guide to the West Indies and Panama," 
by F. A. Ober; "Their Mutual Child," by P. G. Wodehouse; "Polished Ebony," by O. R. Cohen; 
"The Secret of the Tower," by Anthony Hope; "Spriggles," by E. Lawrence Dudley; "The Taker," 
by Daniel Carson Goodman; "The Groper," by Henry G. Aiken; "Tarzan of the Apes" and "Tarzan 
and the Jewels of Opar," by Edgar Rice Burroughs: "More E. K. Means," by the author of "E. K. 
Means;" "Yellow Men Sleep," by Jermey Lane; "The Lion's Mouse," C. N. and A. M. Williamsonj 
"Squaw Point," by Arland D. Weeks; "A Woman's Woman," by NalbrolBartley; "The Happy End,' 
by Joseph Hergesheimer; "The Little Moment of Happiness," by C. B. Kelland; "Old Christmas and 
Bracebrid?e Hall," from "The Sketch Book" of Washington Irving. 



212 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 













































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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 10, 1919. No. 17. 

CANAL WORK IN OCTOBER. 

The following is the report of the Governor to the Secretary of 
War, of Canal work in the month of October, 1919: 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 20, 1919. 
The Honorable, the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of The Panama Canal for the 
month of October, 1919. 

CANAL TRAFFIC 

Traffic exceeded that of any previous month in net tonnage of commercial ships, 
and tolls collected, but not in number of ships or tonnage of cargo. The number of 
ocean-going commercial vessels passing through the Canal in October was 196, 
exclusive of 17 United States Government vessels, as follows:- One cruiser, 3 de- 
stroyers, 3 tugs, 1 mine-sweeper, 2 transports, 1 collier, 2 scout patrols, and 3 merchant 
ships with coal for the Navy, from Atlantic to Pacific; and 1 subchaser, from Pacific 
to Atlantic. The total number of ocean-going vessels was 213, in addition to which 
1 launch went from Pacific to Atlantic. 

Classifications of the traffic are shown in the following tabulations. The net ton- 
nage of 196 commercial ships aggregated 670,100 tons, Panama Canal measurement, 
and was 83,914 tons more than that of commercial ships passing through the Canal 
in September, when 170 ships of 5S6,lcS6 tons made the transit. Their registered 
gross tonnage was 873,006 tons, ar.d their registered net tonnage was 551,825 tons. 
The cargo carried totaled 705,881 tons of 2,240 pounds, and was 67,61 1 tons more than 
that handled in September. Of that in October, 1919, 7,271 tons were carried as deck 
load. Ships of 12 different nationalities were included in the month's traffic. 

The United States coastwise trade was made up of 19 vessels, aggregating 62,082 
tons, Panama Canal measurement, and carried 94,517 tons of cargo. From Atlantic 
to Pacific, 2 ships with a total net tonnage of 6,651 tons, Panama Canal measurement, 
made the transit, carrying 9,749 tons of cargo. From the Pacific to the Atlantic 
there were 17 vessels of 55,431 net tons, Panama Canal measurement, carrying 
84,768 tons of cargo. 

The United States Shipping Board operated all of the westbound ships in the coast- 
wise trade, with a net tonnage of 6,661 tons, Panama Canal measurement, carrying 
9,749 tons of cargo, and 16 of the 17 vessels eastbound. The net tonnage of the 16 
ships from Pacific to Atlantic aggregated 52,583 tons, Panama Canal measurement, 
and their cargo amounted to 80,568 tons. 

PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES. 

The bulk shipments from Atlantic to Pacific were: Crude oil, 25,928 tons, of which 
8,500 tons were from Tampico to Balboa, 7,928 tons from Tampico to Pisagua, and 
9,500 tons from Puerto Lobos to Antofagasta; petroleum, 21,315 tons, of which 
9,000 tons were from Puerto Lobos to Tocopilla, 6,784 tons from Beaumont to 
Shanghai, and 5,531 tons from Puerto Lobos to Taltal; case oil, 12,920 tons, of which 
6,020 tons were from New York to Honolulu, and 6,900 tons from New York to 
Brisbane; fuel oil, 21,080 tons from Puerto Lobos, of which 12,000 tons were consigned 
to Antofagasta and 9,080 tons to San Francisco; coal, 12,017 tons from Norfolk to 
Balboa; mixed cargoes, 55,694 tons, of which 2,630 tons were from Baltimore to 
San Francisco, 3,370 tons from Baltimore to Guayacan, 4,967 tons from England to 
Corral, 20S tons from New York to Tahiti, 7,521 tons from New York to Valparaiso, 
6,319 tons from New York to Talcahuano, 8,000 tons from New York to Honolulu, 
5,879 tons from New York to Kobe, 7,300 tons from New York to Shanghai, 5,300 
tons from New Orleans to Tacoma, and 4,200 tons from Savannah to Honolulu; 
39 cargoes described as "general" amounted to 113,223 tons. 

From Pacific to Atlantic the principal commodities were: Nitrate of soda, 75,927 
tons in 14 whole cargoes, from Chilean ports, 11,200 tons to Halifax, 10,970 tons to 
Belgian ports, 8,575 tons to La Pallice, 2,357 tons to Havre, 4,150 tons to Nantes, 



214 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



8,426 tons to Dunkirk, 7,350 tons to Rotterdam, 2,875 tons to Valencia, 7,700 tons 
to Savannah, 7,509 tons to Wilmington, N. C, and 4,815 tons to New Orleans; flour, 
in 10 whole cargoes, 67,577 tons, from Pacific ports in the United States to New York; 
lumber, 15 whole cargoes, aggregating 30,172 tons; 11 ships carrying 22,831 ton9 
for Great Britain, 2 ships carrying 3,629 tons to Atlantic ports of the United States, 
and 2 ships carrying 3,712 tons to Cuba, all from the west coast of North America; 
railroad ties, of which 10 whole cargoes passed through the Canal, aggregating 
18,094 tons, 7 ships carrying 1 1,847 tons for Great Britain, and 3 ships carrying 6,247 
tons to Atlantic ports of the United States, from the west coast of the United States; 
sugar, 2 whole cargoes, aggregating 10,503 tons, of which 3,603 tons were from Callao, 
Peru, to Havre, France, and 6,900 tons from Salaverry to Queenstown; lubricating 
oil, 1 whole cargo, 4,200 tons from San Francisco to Philadelphia; canned pineapples, 
3,115 tons from Haw r aii to Boston; copra, 799 tons from Levuka to Norfolk. Twenty- 
six cargoes, containing several commodities in each, and described as "mixed," 
aggregated 103,321 tons, and 32 contained the variety designated^as "general," 
amounting to 122,038 tons. 

Ships in ballast numbered 1 from Atlantic, with a net tonnage of 2,01 1 tons, Panama 
Canal measurement, and 10 from Pacific to Atlantic, of 51,715 net tons, a total of 11 
■ships of 53,726 net tons. 

LATIN-AMERICAN TRAFFIC. 

Commercial vessels passing through the Canal on their way to the west coast of 
'Central and South America during October, were, by nationalities, as follows: 



Nationality. 


No. 
of 

ships. 


Registered 

gross 
tonnage. 


Registered 

net 

tonnage. 


Panama 
Canal net 
tonnage. 


Cargo. 


'British 


17 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 

13 


60,418 
8,303 
7,922 

23,587 

13,368 
8,613 
3,802 
5,283 

63,253 


35,823 
6,086 
3,941 

12,942 
8,645 
5,376 
2,839 
3.189 

39,986 


44,263 
6,043 
5,097 

16,467 

11,532 
6,442 
3,969 
3,760 

46,413 


Tons. 
30,364 

679 

1,930 

14,531 

300 




1,500 
920 




67,163 






Total 


44 


191.549 


118,827 


143,996 


117,387 



Of the 44 vessels, 17 with 10,549 tons of cargo originated at the Atlantic terminus 

■of the Canal; 9 with 42,143 tons came from United States ports; 2 with 14,531 

'tons cf petroleum, from Tampico; 3, with 25,928 tons of crude oil, fromTampico, and 

I, with 12,000 tons of fuel oil, from Puerto Lobos to Antofagasta, 10, with general 

cargo from Europe, amounting to 12,236 tons, and 2, with no cargo, from Habana. 

Shipments from the west coast of Central and South America through the Canal 
during October were carried by 56 vessels. Nineteen were bound for Europe, with 
116,301 tons of cargo from Chilean and Peruvian ports; 12 with 41,402 tons were 
bound for the east coast of the United States; 5 in ballast were bound for Tampico; 
1, with 2,357 tons of nitrate, from Taltal to Habana; and 19 completed the voyage 
at the Atlantic terminus of the Canal, discharging 2,361 tons of mixed cargo and 
21,511 tons of general cargo. 

By nationalities, the ships from the west coast of South and Central America were 
as follows: 



Nationality. 


No. 

of 

ships. 


Registered 

gross 

to linage. 


Registered 

net 

tonnage. 


Panama 

Canal 

net 

tonnage. 


Cargo. 




22 
3 
3 
3 
2 

23 


67,691 
12,632 
10,341 
16,653 
13,323 
101,148 


37,892 
7.583 
6,192 

10.470 
8.648 

61,857 


62,717 
8.364 
8,518 
13,400 
11.413 
72,952 


Tom. 
67,691 




9,656 




4,883 




4,150 


Dutch 


17,361 




80,191 






Total 


56 


221.788 


132.552 


177.364 


183,982 



PRINCIPAL TRADE ROUTES. 



The distribution of the traffic through the Canal in October, 1919, according to 
the principal trade routes, was as follows: 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



215 



Atlantic to Pacific. 

United States coastwise 

United States to Australia and New Zealand 

United States to Far East 

United States to west coast of South America 

Cristobal to west coast or South America 

Cuba to west coast ot South America 

Europe to Australia and New Zealand 

Europe to west coast of North America 

Europe to west toast of South America 

Mexico to west coast of North America 

Mexico to west coast of South America 

Miscellaneous 

Tetal 

Pacific to Atlantic. 

United States coastwise 

Australia and New Zealand to Europe 

Far East to Europe 

West coast, North America to Europe 

West coast, South America to Europe 

Far East to east coast of United States 

West coast, South America t o east coast of United States 

West coast, North America to Mexico 

We°t coast, South America to Mexico 

V\ est coast, South America to Cristobal 

West coast, North America to Cuba 

West coast, Sourh America to Cuba 

Miscellaneous 

Total 

* Ballast 



Ves- 
sels. 



123 



Panama 

Canal 

net 

tonnage. 



6,651 
31,882 
47,916 
31,679 
25,776 

6.911 
32,453 
13,934 
46.542 

4,971 

33,088 

100 



281,903 

55,431 

82,190 

266 

39,042 

74,952 

20,777 

33,242 

16.682 

26.267 

28,960 

5,302 

1.502 

3.584 



388,197 



Cargo. 



Ton: 
9,74» 
32,542 
73,549 
42.143 
10,549 



19,866 
5,750 

12,238 
9,080 

52,459 
208 



268,131 

84,768 

86,098 
406 

46.654 
116,301 

28,511 

41,402 

(*) 

(*) 

23,872 
5,657 
2,357 
1,724 



437,750 



SERVICES TO CANAL SHIPPING. 

Repairs were made on 128 vessels during the month, 78 at Cristobal and 50 at 
Balboa. Six vessels were dry docked at Cristobal, and 7 at Balboa. Sales of fuel oil 
to ships from stock of The Panama Canal were 6,145 barrels to 1 vessel at Cristobal, 
and 3,823 barrels to 3 vessels at Balboa. Coal sales were 39,028 tons to 114 vessels 
at Cristobal, and 8,093 tons to 28 vessels at Balboa, a total of 142 vessels receiving 
47,121 tons. Water sold included 7,973,015 gallons to 152 vessels at Cristobal, and 
2,145,000 gallons to 132 vessels at Balboa, a total of 284 vessels receiving 10,118,015 
gallons. Sales of commissary supplies to commercial ships, of lines other than that of 
the Panama Railroad, aggregated $90,699.18, including $2,089.44 for laundry sup- 
plied at Cristobal, §39.83 at Pedro Miguel, and $609.65 from Ancon laundry, delivered 
at Balboa. Laundry service for all ships amounted to $3,408.03. Tug service per- 
formed for vessels using the Canal and the terminal ports was charged at $26,878.90, 
of which $20,342.65 was collected through the office of the Captain of the Port at 
Cristobal, and $6,536.25 at Balboa. 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS. 



Details of the busine ss transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals of the Canal 
are shown in the following tabulations: 



Item. 



Cristobal. 



Balboa. 



Total. 



Commercial ships making transit of Canal 

Net tonnage of commercial ships, Panama Canal measurement. . 

United States equivalent net tonnage ol commercial ships 

Registered gross tonnage of commercial ships 

Registered net tonnage of commercial ships 

Cargo through Canal in commercial ships, tons of 2,210 pounds. 

Deck load cargo, included in above 

Nationality of commercial ships through Canal: 

British 

Norwegian 

Peruvian 

Chilean 



73 
281,903 
229,238 
363,369 
232,696 
268,131 
7U 

32 
5 
2 
2 



French 

Swedish 

Japanese 

Dutch 

Spanish 

Italian 

United States. 

Total 



123 
388,197 
316,617 
509,637 
319,129 
437,750 
6,557 

38 
3 
3 
3 
1 



63 



196 
670, 100 
545,855 
873,006 
551,825 
705,881 
7.271 

70 
8 
5 
5 
1 
8 
2 
8 
4 
3 
1 

81 

198 



216 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Item. 


Cristobal. 


Balboa. 


Total 


Panama Canal net tonnage of commercial ships through the Canal: 
British 


125,723 
26,841 
5,097 
6,043 


143,566 
13,400 
8,361 
8,518 
266 
8,428 


269,289 

40,241 

13,461 

14,561 

266 

8,428 

7,970 

33,575 

22,965 

6,442 

3 750 














Swedish 


7,970 

24,782 

11,552 

6,442 

3,750 

63,703 




8,793 
11,413 


Dutch 


Spanish 






United States 


185,449 


249 152 






Total 


281,903 

101,737 

23.019 

3,345 

3,675 


388,197 

112,159 
10.6P6 
6,874 
5,237 
271 
7,848 


670,100 

213,896 

33,715 

10,219 

8,912 

271 


United States equivalent net tonnage of commercial ships through the 
Canal: 
British 






Chilean 




French 




7,848 
4 572 




4,572 
20.645 
8,592 
5,430 
3,239 
54,984 




7,789 
8,460 


28,434 
17 C52 


Dutch 




5,430 
3 239 






United States 


157,283 


212,267 




Total 


229,238 

163. 8S6 

31.4S5 

7,922 

8,303 


316,617 

178,050 
16,653 
12.6^2 
10,: j 41 

v 373 
13,9<j2 

11,905 
1 ; , 323 


615.855 
341 936 


Registered gross tonnage of commercial ships through the Canal: 
British 


Norwegian 


48 138 


Peruvian 


20,554 

18,644 

373 


Chilean 








13,992 




7,547 

31,114 

13,368 

8,613 

5,283 

85,848 


7 547 


Japanese 


43,019 


Dutch 


26 691 


Spanish 


8,613 


Italian 


252,368 


5,283 


United States 


338.216 






Total ;.... 


363,369 

103,527 
19,«7S 
3,941 
6,086 


599,637 

112,0:'6 
10,470 
7,5-3 
6,192 
277 
8,349 


873,006 
215,623 


Registered net tonnage of commercial ships, through the Canal: 
British 




30 148 


Peruvian 


1 1 , 524 




12,278 


Belgian 


277 


trench 




8,349 


Swedish 


5.697 
21.535 
8,645 
5,376 
3,189 
55,022 


5,697 




7.712 
8,648 


29,247 


Dutch 


17,293 


Spanish 


5,376 


Italian 




3.189 


United States 


157..SC2 


212,824 






Total 


232,696 

109,442 

25,531 

1,930 

679 


319,129 

165,866 
4,150 
9,656 
4,8-3 
406 
11,323 


551,825 


Cargo carried by ships of various nationalities: 


275,308 




29,681 




11.586 


Chilean 


5,562 




406 






11,323 


Swedish 


1,759 

36,566 

300 

920 

91,013 


1,750 




15,0 2 
17,361 

209,013 


51,658 


Dutch 


17,661 


Italian 


920 




300,026 






Total 


268,131 

1 
3 

3 

1 
2 
1 
2 
3 


437,750 


705,881 


Vessels passing through the Canal free of tolls: 
U. S. Navv cruisers 


1 


U. S. Navy destroyers 




3 


U. S. Navy tugs 




3 


U. S. Navv mine-sweepers 




1 


U. S. Navy transports 




2 


U. S. Navy collier 




1 






2 


Merchant ships with coal for Navy 




3 


U. S. Navy subchaser 


1 


1 








Total 


16 


1 


17 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



217 



Item. 



Cristobal. 



Balboa. 



Total. 



Launches: 

Net tonnage of launches, Panama Canal measurement 

Total ocean-going ships transiting Canal 

Cargo on which no tolls were charged tons . . 

Commercial ships passing through Canal without cargo, but not in ballast . 

Net tonnage of above, Canal measurement 

Commercial ships through Canal in ballast 

Net tonnage of above, Canal measurement 

Total commercial ships without cargo, transiting Canal 

Net tonnaee of above, Canal measurement 

Motor ships through the Canal 

Net tonnage of motor ships, Canal measurement 

Sailing ships through the Canal 

Net tonnage of sailing ships, Canal measurement 

Tolls levied on laden ships through the Canal 

Tolls levied on ships without cargo, but not in ballast 

Tolls levied on ships in ballast 

Tolls on launches 



89 

34,793 

1 

3,066 

9 

23,591 

10 

26,659 

5 

13,866 



2 
124 



$259,851.95 

$2,2D7.50 

$16,926.84 



8342 

$37 



10 

51,715 

10 

51,715 

3 

404 

1 

654 

064 30 



281 15 
$2 40 



2 

213 

34,793 

1 

3,066 

19 

75,308 

20 

78,374 

8 

14,270 

1 

654 

$601,916.25 

$2,297.50 

$54,207 99 

$2.40 



Total tolls levied 

Total ships entering port, including Canal transit. 
Total ships clearing port, including Canal transit . 



Total ships handled 

Net registered tonnage of vessels entering port. 
Net registered tonnage of vessels clearing port. 



Total for vessels entering and clearing 

Registered gross tonnage of vessels entering 

Registered gross tonnage of vessels clearing 

Total registered gross tonnage of vessels entering and clearing. 



Vesseb entering port, but not passing through the Canal 

Net tonnage of above 

Gross tonnage of above 

Vessels clearing port, but not passing through the Canal 

Net tonnage of above 

Gross tonnage of above 

Vessels passing through Canal, and handling passengers or cargo at 
port entered 

Net tonnage of above 

Gross tonnage of above 

Vessels passing through Canal, and handling passengers or cargo at port 
cleared 

Net tonnage of above 

Gross tonnage of above 

Transit cargo arriving tons. 

Transit cargo cleared tons . 

Local cargo arriving tons . 

Local cargo shipped tons. 

Total local cargo handled tons. 

Total local and transit cargo arriving tons. 

Total local and transit cargo cleared tons. 

Cargo received by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R.. . .tons. 
Cargo dispatched by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R.tons. 
Cargo rehandled by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R...tons. 

Total cargo handled by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of 

P. R. R tons. 

Cargo stevedored, included in aboi e tons. 

Commercial vessels other than P. R. R. supplied with bunker coal 

Coal supplied to commercial vessels other than Panama Railroad... .tons. 

Panama Railroad vessel supplied with bunker coal 

Coal supplied Panama Railroad Steamship Line tons. 

D. S. Navy vessels supplied with bunker coal 

Coal supplied U. S. Navy vessels tons. 

U. S. Army vessels supplied with bunker coal 

Coal supplied to U. S. Army vessels tons. 

Total vessels supplied with bunker coal 

Total coal furnished to veasels tons . 

Coal supplied Panama Railroad departments tons. 

Coal supplied Army, excepting vessels tons. 

Coal supplied The Panama Canal tons. 

Coal supplied individuals and companies tons. 

Total coal furnished tons. 

Coal received during October .tons! 

Coal on hand, November 1 tons. 

Vessels supplied with water .'. \ 

Water sold to ships gals [ 

Vessels dry-docked . ... 

Commercial vessels furnished commissary supplies 

Panama Railroad vessels furnished commissary supplies 

Other U. 8. Government vessels furnished commissary supplies 



Total vessels furnished commissary supplies. 



$279,076.29 
241 
239 



$379,347.85 
215 
220 



480 
682,950 
693,987 



435 
584,363 
595,546 



1,376,937 
1,105,430 
1,123,379 

2,228,809 

41 
120,000 
196,292 

46 
131,404 
215.761 

27 
54,929 
99,216 

26 
58,113 
105,102 
719,368 
701,018 
35,351 
3,230 



1,179,909 
931,597 
951,218 



38,581 



754,719 
704,248 
50,436 
31,686 
3,807 



85,929 

36.648 

106 

38,050 

1 

250 

3 

108 

4 

620 

114 

39,028 

877 

143 

2,326 

519 



42,893 

24,036 

42,010 

152 

7,973,015 

6 

148 

11 

16 



175 



1,882,815 



12,526 
17,849 
4 
13,750 
21,469 

39 
71,710 
132,460 

39 
74,710 
132,460 
701,915 
722,530 
24,875 
1,447 



26,322 



726,790 
723,977 

3,600 
422 

2,871 



6,893 

168 

24 

6,781 



1 

1.184 

3 

128 

28 

8.093 

40 



746 



8,879 

12,017 

12,204 

132 

2.145.000 

7 

75 

1 

17 



93 



$658,424.14 
456 
459 



915 
1.267,313 
1,289,533 



2,556,846 
2.037,027 
2.074 597 



4,111,624 

47 
132,526 
214,141 

50 
145,154 
237,230 



129,639 
231,676 

65 

132,823 

237,562 

1,421,283 

1,423,548 

60,226 

4,677 



64,903 



1,481,509 

1,428,225 

54,036 

32,108 

6,678 



92,822 

36,816 

130 

44.831 

1 

250 

4 

1.292 

7 

748 

142 

47,121 

917 

143 

3.072 

519 



51,772 

36,053 

54,214 

284 

10.118,015 

13 

223 

12 

33 



268 



218 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Item. 



Cristobal. 



Balboa. 



TotaL 



Commissary sales to commercial vessels: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage , 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous , 



Total 

Commissary sales to Panama Railroad vessels: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 



Total 

Commissary sales to other Government vessels: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 



Total. 



Total commissary sales to vessels 

Fuel oil sold to commercial vessels barrels. 

Fuel oil issued to U. S. Navy barrels . 

Fuel oil issued to U. S. Army barrels. 

Fuel oil issued to Canal departments barrels. 

Total furnished from Canal tanks barrels . 

Fuel oil on hand November 1 barrels . 

Other oil pumped barrels . 

Diesel oil on hand November 1 barrels. 

Passengers arriving, including transit passengers: 

First cabin 

Other than first cabin 



Total. 



Passengers departing, including transit passengers: 

First cabin , 

Other than first cabin 



Total 

Total movements of passengers. 
Passengers disembarking: 

First cabin 

Other than first cabin , 



Total 

Passengers embarking 

First cabin 

Other than first cabin. 



Total 

Services to American seamen: 

Seamen shipped 

Seamen paid off 

Seamen deserted .' 

Seamen deceased 

Seamen lodged, subsisted, and repatriated. 



Total seamen handled 

Wages of American seamen: 

Total amount earned 

Deductions approved by Deputy Shipping Commissioners. 



Balance due seamen 



Paid to seamen . 
Received on deposit for seamen. 
Services to American vessels: 

Crews shipped 

Crews paid off 

Shipping articles written 

Marine notes of protest noted. 



$1,349 20 

10,386 76 

41,402 03 

2,089 44 

2,063.26 



$617.85 

5,952 85 

24.740 92 

617.35 

1.439 67 



$1,967.05 

16,339.61 

66,142.95 

2,706.79 

3,502.95 



$57,290.71 

$166 20 
1,747 06 
5,846 39 
642.87 
1,286.07 



$33,368.64 



212.08 
622.67 



$90,659.35 

$166.20 
1,959.14 
6,469.06 
642.87 
1,286.07 



$9,688 59 

$163.55 

10,307.45 

6,962 45 

46.47 

1,066.02 



834.75 

$307.28 

4,032 83 

14,305.11 

11.90 

1,023.26 



$10,523.34 

$470.83 

14,340.28 

21,267.56 

68.37 

2,089.28 



$18,545.94 



$19,680.38 



$38,226.32 



$85,5:5 24 

6,145 

205 



$53,883.77 
3,157 



666 
22,688 



$139,409.01 

9,302 

205 

666 

28,418 



12,080 

64,046 

233,842 



2,697 
3,316 



26,511 

110,906 

129,801 

1,499 

1,854 
3,798 



38.591 

174,952 

363,643 

1,499 

4,551 
7,114 



6,013 



2,931 
3,794 



5,652 



1,877 
3,801 



11,665 
el 

4,808 
7,595 



6,725 
12,738 



5,678 
11,330 



12,403 
24,068 



1,338 
675 



149 
G4 



1,487 
739 



2,013 



1,384 
504 



213 



172 
67 



2,226 



1,556 
571 



1,888 

129 
96 
11 



30 



266 



$9,556.41 
770.34 



8,786.07 
3,244 69 
5,541.38 



239 

177 

145 

9 

2 



2,127 

306 
239 

20 
2 

30 



331 



597 



$15,322 27 
4,169.61 



11.152,66 
6,745.94 
4,406.72 



$24 
4 



878 68 
939.95 



,938 73 
,990.63 
,948.10 



LOCK OPERATION. 
Lockages of commercial vessels were made during the month as follows: 




Number of lockages. 


Number of vessels. 




North. 


South. 


Tofal. 


North. 


South. 


TotaL 




120 
123 
118 


71 

77 
76 


191 

200 
194 


124 
123 
123 


76 

78 
78 


200 




201 




201 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



219 



Lockages of Army and Navy vessels, vessels operated by The Panama Canal, and 
of commercial vessels, are included in the following summary of all lockages during 
the month: 



Lockages. 


Gatun. 


Pedro 
Miguel. 


Miraflorea. 




192 
14 
5 


200 
12 

26 


194 




11 




24 








211 

200 

48 


238 

201 

78 


229 


Vessels: 


201 




81 








248 


279 


282- 



Water consumed for all lockages amounted to 1,629,870,000 cubic feet, that used 
at Pedro Miguel becoming available for second use at Miraflores Locks. 

Consumption of water by the locks during the month wa s as fo'lows: 

Pedro Miguel. 



Gatun. 



Miraflorea. 



Lockage 

Leakage 

Maintenance. 



Cubic feet. 
881,220,000 
20,000,000 



Cubic feet. 
748,650,000 
30,500,000 



Cubic feet. 
704,900,000 
15,000,000 
14,010,000 



Total. 



901,220,000 



779,150,000 



733,910,000 



METEOROLOGY. 

Rainfall during the month ranged from 10.21 inches at the Culebra station on the 
Pequeni River to 23.22 inches at the Gatun River station. The greatest precipitation 
recorded in any one day was 4.04 inches, at Juan Mina on the 10th. 

Seismic disturbances were recorded at Balboa Heights on the 9th and 26th of the 
month. The shock of the 9th was of near-by origin and though of small amplitude 
was generally felt. 

The Chagres River discharge at Alhajuela was 26 per cent below the 18-year Oc- 
tober average, or 2,512 c. f. s. against a mean of 3,386 c. f. s. and furnished 24 per 
cent of the Gatun Lake total yield. The maximum October discharge in the 18 
years was 5,135 c. f. s in 1914, and the minimum discharge 2,031 c. f. s. in 1904. 
The maximum momentary discharge for October, 1919, was 9,375 c. f. s. at elevation 
of 96.60 on the 11th, and the minimum momentary' discharge was 1,613 c. f. s. at 
elevation 91.93, on the 30th and 31st. There were no freshets in the Chagres 
River during the month with a rise of more than 5 feet at Alhajuela. 

The elevation of Gatun Lake on October 31 was 86.30, as compared with 85.47 
at the close of the prior month. 

ELECTRICAL DIVISION. 

Gatun hydroelectric station — The net output of the hydroelectric station for the 
month of October was 5,228,924 kilowatt-hours, and the computed water con- 
sumption was 3,997,672,200 cubic feet. 

Miraflores steam plant — The net output of the steam plant was minus 156,190 
kilowatt-hours, and the oil consumption was 2,218.06 barrels. This station handled 
all the load on the south end of the system for about three and one-half hours on 
October 11, on account of the removal of a span of Gamboa Bridge. 

Total power output — The total power output for both generating stations was 
5,072,734 kilowatt-hours, and the total amount of power distributed to feeders by 
substations and generating plants was 4,550,994 kilowatt-hours, representing an 
energy loss of 10.2 per cent. ... 

Transmission line — There was one interruption to transmission line service during 
the month, caused by breaking of a switch solenoid arm casting at the Gatun sub- 
station. Service was interrupted at Miraflores 3 minutes and Balboa 2 minutes. 

Marine work — Repairs and additions of electric equipment, embracing 38 items, 
were made at Cristobal on the following vessels: Nobles, tug Engineer, Middlebury, 
Cyrus W. Field, U. S. M. P. Graham, Kenosha, Balboa, Gen. W. C. Gorgas, Lake 
Como, Achilles, Aysen, Winnipeg, Deroche, C-46, Cabeza, Ontario, Guatemala, A. G. 
Forse, Imlay, Colon, launch Rodman, and dredge Gamboa. Work was in progress 
at the end of the month on the C-44, C-45, Balboa, Caribbean, and tug Tavernilla. 
At Balboa, electrical work was done on the following vessels: Paita, Cristobal, 
barges Nos. 13 and 29, Orotina, Okiya, dredge Corozal, tug Gorgona, Bonij ay, Melville, 
Asotin, tug Gatun, Buhisan, Lima, Sewickley, dredge Cascadas, Dardania, Butte, 



220 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Navy target raft No. 50, Goodspeed, Ludlow, Aspenhill, War Company, Ulysses, 
C-40, U. S. M. P. Graham, dredge No. 84, Tanka, crane Hercules, Minnesotan, 
■Castle Point, C-40, Guatemala, Bonham, Santa Elena, and Colindo. 

SHOPS, FOUNDRY, AND DRY DOCK WORK. 

The Paita, formerly the Anubis, the last of the 5 ex-German vessels brought from 
'Peru, was completed and delivered. These vessels had their machinery completely 
wrecked by the Germans before they were seized, and the work performed on them 
"was of such a character that its successful accomplishment places the Canal shops on a 
parity with first-class shipyards in the continental United States. The Paita was 
formally turned over to the Shipping Board on October 6, and on the 9th left for 
Chile to take on a cargo of nitrate for the United States. The vessel made slow speed 
on her trial runs, due to the use of coal which had lain in her bunkers for four years, 
and was probably poor when mined, but with Pocohontas coal the ship made better 
speed than her log book indicates she made while under German ownership. 

The main engines of the Cristobal, which had been removed from the vessel and 
thoroughly overhauled during the process of hull repairs in the engine space, were 
replaced and new boilers were hoisted into the vessel. The steel work advanced 
considerably and the cargo cold storage spaces were nearly completed except for the 
refrigeration system. Construction of the passenger accommodations was advanced 
and the work on the woodwork for them was begun. 

The oil-burning parts of the Melville were received from the United States, repairs 
to the vessel were effected, and it departed for the Pacific Coast. 

The extensive repairs on the wooden steamers Okiya, Bonifay, Asotin, and Sewick- 
ley, were completed. 

The Chilean cruiser Lima was dry docked ; the rudder was removed, and new pintles 
and gudgeons were fitted. On account of the construction of the vessel, this work 
was more difficult than the ordinary rudder job. 

The docking of the Huasco marks the docking of a second ship for the Compafiia 
Sud-Americana de Vapores (Chilean Line), the company hitherto having dry docked 
its ships at Callao. 

The Guatemala of the Pacific Steam Navigation Company was dry-docked for 
painting and cleaning only, but examination disclosed an urgent necessity for rudder 
repairs. As the ship was on a passenger run, with mails, continuous night and day 
work was resorted to and the repairs were effected within 4 days. 

Toward the end of the month the wooden steamship Bonham was towed to the 
plant and placed in dry dock. Her rudderpost had been carried away at sea, together 
with the lower portion of her sternpost and the after-portion of her keel. In addition, 
the rudder stock was bent, steering engine completely wrecked, and her propeller 
broken beyond repair. Repairs were in progress at the end of the month. 

At the Cristobal Shops the following vessels arrived for repair: A. G. Forse, Cauca, 
Balboa, Ulysses, Culebra, Gen. W. C.Gorgas, Lake Como, Dakotan, Urubamba, Nobles, 
Aspenhill, Alda, Guatemala, Ontario, Mantaro, Cabeza, Allianca, Colon, Advance, 
Panama, Caribbean, Achilles, Middlebury, Gen. Geo. W. Goethals, Zarembo, Himoto, 
Antillan,Ebro, Imlay, Moosabee, Peru, Alkmaar,Stuyvesant, Manavi, Chimo, Costigan, 
Deroche, Colorado Springs, Metapan, Poe, Cyrus W. Fields, Percival Parks, Bradford, 
Kenosha, Chile, Capimee, Bottineau, Blue Eagle, Jamaica, Cranenest, Montcalm, 
Holbrook, Salvador, Ady, tug Tavernilla, derrick barge No. 157, subchaser No. 284, 
tugs Mariner and Porto Bello, C-31, C-33, C-40, C-44, C-45, C-46, launch Capron, 
U. S. A. T. Marica, U. S. A. T. Madawaska, launch Wilkelm, Bald Hill, Lake Elk 
Water, Memphis, Hattonville, Belle Buckle, Asotin, Winnipeg, and Bosworth. 

Of the above, the following were in dry dock during the month: Cauca, A.G. Forse, 
Balboa, Ady, tug Tavernilla, and subchaser No. 284. 

At the Cristobal Shops 194 individual and company job orders were issued during 
the month, 1 of which was for work on a submarine, and 4 on other Navy craft. 
Of the remaining 189, 84 covered repairs to ships making Cristobal or in transit 
through the Canal, exclusive of Panama Railroad ships. The overhauling of the 
Culebra was continued during the month. The extension of an air line to and on 
Pier No. 6, Cristobal, was completed during the month and the manufacture of a 
wharf bunker for the Cristobal coaling station was started during the latter part of the 
month. 

Work was performed at the Balboa Shops during the month for the following 
vessels: Bonham, Huasco, Fassett, Cristobal, Paita, Delfina, Minnequa, Brasher, 
Buhisan, Asotin, Coalinga, Bonifay, Okiya, Bushrcd, Setvickley, Dardania, Guatemala, 
Castle Point, La Habra, Butte, Mexico, Balboa, Goodspeed, San Joaquin, Tanka, 
Metatua, Aspenhill, El Segundo, War Company, Acajutla, Imlay, Bradford, C-40, 
Minnesotan, Colindo, Bald Butte, Melville, Iroquois, U. S. M. P. Graham, tug 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



221 



Slocum, destroyers Bailey and Chew, collier Ulysses, crusier Lima, dredge Corozal, 
Ludlow, Almirante, Orotina, Santa Elena, and Chiriqui. 

Of the above, the following were in dry dock during the month: Cristobal, Corgona, 
Guatemala, Huasco,Bonham, and Lima. 

Patterns made and foundry output, compared with September, were as follows. 





October. 


September. 




Patterns. 
59 
19 
39 


Pounds. 
134.067J 
24,093 
15,985^ 


Patterns. 1 Pounds. 
64 117,173 




19 ! 27,361 




62 ' 27,097^ 



Equipment was hostled as follows: Locomotives, 1,599; cranes, 235; making a 
total of 1,834. Three hundred and thirty shop and 1,517 field repairs were made on 
cars, 803 freight cars were repacked, and 3,166 passenger coaches were packed, cleaned, 
oiled, and inspected. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 

Erection of the Puerto Obaldia radio station was 90 per cent completed at the end 
of the month. 

Demolition of the old storehouse at Mount Hope was completed. 

Construction of an oil storage shed for the Balboa store was 25 per cent com- 
pleted. 

The office building for the Central and South American Telegraph Company 
at Balboa was brought to 95 per cent of completion. 

Work on the tuberculosis ward at Corozal Hospital continued held up, pending the 
arrival of material. 

Work was begun on converting the old Section "F" of Ancon Hospital into family 
cpiarters, and was 20 per cent completed at the end of the month. 

Terminal construction. — In the reconstruction of the Royal Mail pier, Colon, the 
placing of concrete floor slab was 90 per cent completed during the month. On Pier 
No. 6, Cristobal, the doors and washing walls were completed, and the cranes were 
advanced to 90 per cent of completion. 

DREDGING DIVISION. 

The total excavation by dredges during the month of October -was 340,150 cubic 
yards, as follows: 





Classified as: 


Character 
of work. 


Stations. 




Cubic yards. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Equipment. 


o 47,250 


30,000 

41,600 

76,700 

20,800 

9,200 

30,000 

800 

9,000 

6,100 


17,250 
50,000 



'40', 200 ' 
.8,500 


Maintenance. . . . 

Maintenance.. . . 
Maintenance. . . . 

Original 

Maintenance. . . . 

Maintenance. ... 

Aux. Const 

Balboa Inner 
Harbor 

Maintenance. ... 

Total for month 


East Culebra Slide. 
1774-00 to 1790-00 




« 91,600 


Cucaracha Slide. 
1821-00 to 1806-00 




6 76,700 


2203-00 to 2239-00 


No. 84 


b 20.S00 
i 9,200 




No. 86. 
No. 86 


b 30,000 


Canal Prism. 
2079-50 to 2097-50 


No. 86. 


i 800 




No. 86. 


c 49,200 






c 8 500 








Sta. 1-75 to 2-25 










d 6.100 


2231-00 and 2339-50 










340. 150 


224,200 


115,950 





(a) Gaillard Cut. 



(6) Pacific entrance. 



(c) Atlantic terminal. (d) Balboa inner harbor. 



The following disposition was made of the excavated material: Seventy-six 
thousand seven hundred cubic yards were dumped in the San Juan fill; 6,100 cubic 
yards at sea beyond the Pacific entrance; 60,800 cubic yards in the flats west of the 
Canal at Balboa; 138,850 cubic yards in Gatun Lake, north of Gamboa; and 57,700 
cubic yards between the end of the East Breakwater and Margarita Point. 

Slide movement — On October 3, Cucaracha slide became active and the movement 
continued during the remainder of the month. It is estimated that 150,000 cubic 
yards of material moved into the Canal area during the month. The dredge Cascadas 
dredged in front of this area throughout the period and kept the situation well in 
hand. There was no interference with Canal traffic and a reliable channel was main- 
tained at all times. 

On October 16, East Culebra slide, between stations 1775-00 and 1788-00 
became active and continued for two days. Since then, there has been no general 
movement. This movement brought an estimated quantity of 125,000 cubic yards 



222 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



of material into the Canal area. The dredgeGamboa was immediately put in operation 
at this area and continued dredging the remainder of the month. There was no 
interfererce with Canal traffic and a reliable channel was maintained at all times. 
The excavation remaining; to be done in the Canal prism, on November 1, was 
172,400 cubic yards of earth and rock, and from the Cristobal coaling station and 
Balboa inner harbor, 2,100 and 167,800 cubic yards, respectively. 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING DIVISION. 

The circulating water system for the cold storage plant at Mount Hope was 
completed; 170 linear feet of pipe were placed and 21 cubic yards of concrete poured 
during October. 

In grading and filling for the new silver townsite, Mount Hope, grading was 75 
per cent completed, water lines 10 per cent completed, and sewers 2 per cent com- 
pleted. Fourteen thousand three hundred cubic yards of fill were placed and graded. 

At the new Panama Railroad stables in Colon, the grading, rolling, drains, and 
water lines were completed, and the placing of concrete is 50 per cent completed. 

No work was performed during the month on the sewer and water lines for the 
Central and South American Telegraph Company's building at Balboa. 

The sewer from North Avenue, Panama, to the beach was 60 per cent completed 
at the end of October. 

Water pumped in the northern district amounted to 225,337,000 gallons, and in the 
southern district to 580,752,030 gallons, making a total of 806,089,030 gallons, as 
compared with 786,879,500 gallons in September. Colon was furnished with 55,074,- 
600 gallons, Panama with 85,503,000 gallons, and 10,1 18,015 gallons were sold to 284 
ships. The incinerator at Gavilan Island burned 2,065 tons of garbage and 53 dead 
animals in October. 

WORKING FORCE. 

Effective October 22, 1919. 



Department or Division. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 


Operation and Maintenance: 

Office 


40 
347 
249 
121 
159 
145 
976 
141 

61 


45 

1,940 

313 

1,894 

560 

882 

1,772 

420 

223 


85 




2,287 


Electrical Division 


562 




2,015 




719 




1,027 




2,748 




561 


Fortifications 


284 






Total 


2,239 

160 
£8 
215 
29 
241 
242 
534 

45 
145 
75 

85 
5 


8,049 

1,926 
410 

1,585 

504 

11 

1,007 
283 

509 
269 
766 
804 
101 


10,288 


Supply Department:. 


2 086 




438 




1,800 




533 




252 


Health 


1,249 




817 


Panama Railroad: 






414 




841 




889 




105 








4,043 


16,224 


20,267 







The total gold force at work on October 22 was 7 less than the 4,050 at work on 
September 24, and the silver force was 2,029 less than the 18,253 then at work. As 
compared with the gold force for the corresponding month of last year, reported as of 
October 25, 1918, the gold force was an increase of 1,197 over the 2,846 at work on 
that date, and the silver force a decrease of 440 over the 16,664 of that date. 

The occupation of quarters or October 31 was as follows: 



Oecupants. 


Men. 


Women. 


Children. 


Total. 




3,462 

191 

5,329 


2,134 

41 

1,995 


2,589 

58 

3,763 


8,185 

290 

11,087 








Total 


8.982 


4,170 


6,410 


19,562 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 223 

PUBLIC HEALTH. 

Sixty cases of malaria were reported during the month of October as compared 
with 112 cases during the month of September. One deatli occurred from malaria; 
7 cases of influenza were discharged from ("anal Zone hospitals; no new cases were 
reported and no deaths occurred from influenza in October. 

Pneumonia eases reported numbered 4 and there was 1 death from pneumonia, 
as compared with 15 eases and 2 deaths during the preceding month. 

Typhoid fever caused 3 admissions and 1 death, as compared with 5 admissions 
and 1 death during September. 

One case of smallpox was admitted from the interior of Panama. There were no 
deaths from smallpox. 

Two cases of leprosy were admitted to Ancon Hospital and transferred to the 
colony at Palo Seco. 

RECEIl'TS AND SALES OF MATERIAL AND SUPPLIES. 

The value of material received during the month on United State- requisitions 
was S47 1,902.50, as compared with $499,551.88 in. September. Of that received in 
October, $389,870.64 was chargeable to operation and maintenance; $75,833.80 
to construction and equipment; and $6,198.06 to miscellaneous departments. Isth- 
mian, cash sales from storehouses and obsolete store amounted to $36,47i>.53j of which 
$34,365.65 was for stock, $596.12 for scrap, and $1,513.76 for obsolete and second-hand 
material. The more important sales made in the United States were the ladder 
dredge Corozal, for $190,000; spares for the Corozal for $125,000; one Lidgerwood 
hoisting engine and boiler for $2,000; and 1,458 exhausted storage batterv elements 
for $556.37. 

The total sales of material from storehouses to steamships for the month, including 
fuel oil, but excluding sales by the Commissary Division, which amounted to $139,- 
409.01, were SIS, 411. 70. Sales of commissary supplies to all purchasers for the 
month aggregated $1,002,311.47, made up as follows: To steamships, other than 
United States naval vessels and those of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, 
$90,766.40; to The Panama Canal, $120,088.71; to the United States Government, 
includirg sales to the Army and Navy, $189,066.87; to individuals and companies, 
principally through charge accounts in the retail stores, $20,298.46; to the Panama 
Railroad, including its steamships and the Hotel Washington, $25,187.03; and to 
individuals purchasing with coupons, $556,904. 

FINANCIAL RECEIPTS AM) EXPENDITURES. 

The cash balance in Canal appropriations on October 31, exclusive of fortifications 
was $16,129,405.75; the balance in fortifications was $8,386,387.63. Payments from 
appropriations by Disbursing Clerk in Washington amounted to $650,192.31, and 
by the Paymaster on the Isthmus to $1,428,774.82. Purchases of commissary books 
from the Panama Railroad Company amounted to $341,655.16. Collections of tolls 
totaled $661,307.74. Deposits of $227,643.77 were made with the Assistant Treasurer 
of the United States to be applied on payment of tolls and other charges against 
vessels using the Canal. The total Panama Canal collections on the Isthmus were 
$2,533,044.07, and collections by the Disbursing Clerk, Washington, $67,773.57. 
Receipts from the Canal Zone and miscellaneous funds were $178,508.36, and dis- 
bursements from the same source amounted to $157,978.34. October payrolls on the 
Isthmus aggregated SI, 247, 252.09, as compared with $1,204,043.99 for' September, 
a difference of $42,308.10 

Respectfully, 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Fuel Oil at $1.50 a Barrel. 

Crude fuel oil from tanks of The Panama Canal is being delivered to 
vessels at Cristobal and Balboa for $1.50 per barrel of 42 gallons. 
This is Mexican oil, with a calorific value exceeding 140,000 British 
thermal units per United States gallon, specific gravity not exceeding 
0.96 at 15° Centigrade, viscosity not exceeding 35° Engler at 150° F., 
and sulphur content not exceeding 4.5 per cent. These prices have 
been effective since October 15, 1919. 



224 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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CJ . E 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



225 



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226 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending December 6, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Paul Harwood. . 

MicMlebury 

Volga , 

General Gorgas. 

Manavi 

Santa Leonora.. 

Parismina 

Chile 

Balboa 

Santa Marta 

Ulysses 

W. S. Rheem... 

Atenas 

Ellerdale 

Huasco 

Panama 



Ucayali 

Acajutla 

Middlebury 

Northern Pacific. 

Ancon 

Urubamba 



Line or charterer. 



Pan.-Amer. Pet. & Transp. Co. ... 
Panama Railroad Cattle Industry 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co , 

United States Army , 

United Fruit Company , 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Colombian Maritime Co , 

United Fruit Company , 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

United States Shipping Board 

United Fruit Company 

Royal Mail Steamship Line 

Chilean Steamship Line 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. , 

United Fruit Company 

Peruvian Steamship Line 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Panama Railroad Cattle Industry. 

United States Army 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line.. 
Peruvian Steamship Line 



Arrived. 



November 30 



December 1. 



December 1. 
December 3. 
December 2. 
December 3. 
December 3. 
December 3. 
December 3. 
December 4. 
December 4. 



December 4. 
December 5. 
December 5. 
December 6. 
December 6. 



Departed. 



November 30 
November 30 
November 30 , 
December 6. . . 
December 2. . . 
December 3. . . 
December 3. . . 
December 4. . . 
December 4. . . 
December 4. . . 
December 5. . . 
December 6. . . 
December 5. . . 
December 6. . . 



December 4. . 
December 6. . 
December 6. . 



Cargo 



Discharged Laded, 



Tons. 



2,793 



2,109 



682 

193 

12,379 

10,000 

1,212 

160 

1,843 

3,119 

5 



989 

300 

45 

10,379 

2,028 



Tom. 

C) 

C) 

(*) 

4,305 
544 
13 
81 
458{ 
123 
848 

H 

C) 
192 

1,386 



1 

882} 



C) 



* No cargo laded. 

Report of Car£o Discharged arrd Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending December 6, 1919. 





Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


Departed. 


Cargo — 


Name of vessel. 


Discharged 


Laded. 






November 30 . 
December 1.. . 
December 4. . . 
December 4. . . 


November 30 . 
December 2. . . 
December 5. . . 
December 6. . . 


Tons. 


Tont. 
56 




137 

68 

3,083 

91 

1 

1 


50 








United States Shipping Board 










December 1.. . 
December 2. . . 
December 4. . . 
December 4. . . 
December 3.. . 
December 3.. . 
December 6. . . 


December 1.. . 
December 2. . . 




Ebro 






Chile 


4 








21 




Pacific Steam Navigation Co 






13 




December 3. . . 
December 6. . . 


1 




Ucayali 




7 



Bark Towed from San Francisco into Atlantic Ocean. 

The 4- masted bark Golden Gate arrived at Balboa early in the morning 
of December 9 in tow of the tug Storm King, from San Francisco via 
Salina Cruz. The Golden Gate is on the way to Leith with a cargo of 
3,163 tons of barley. The tug is to tow her about 300 miles offshore 
from Cristobal, drop her, and return to San Francisco by way of the 
Canal. Both vessels are owned by the Rolph Navigation and Coal Co., 
of San Francisco, which has used this same method of handling sailing 
ships several times before. 



Visit of Secretary of War. 

The Honorable Newton D. Baker, Secretary of War, and party, 
including Gen. Peyton C. March, Chief of Staff of the United States 
Army, and Maj.-Gen. John L. Chamberlin, Inspector General, 
arrived from New York on December 4, on the transport Northern 
Pacific, and departed on the same ship for San Juan, Porto Rico, on 
December 8. During his four days' visit on the Isthmus the Secretary 
of War made an inspection of the Canal and its terminal adjuncts, 
military posts, and fortifications. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



227 



Relief of Passenger Congestion on Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

Advice has been received from the United States that the congestion 
in traffic of Canal employees returning to the Isthmus on ships of the 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line having been relieved, it is possible to 
begin making assignments to these ships of nondependent relatives 
at the $45 rate. At the time the congestion ended about 140 applica- 
tions were filed on a waiting list, some dated as far back as June, but 
it is thought that a considerable proportion will have given up the idea 
of coming to the Isthmus at this time, and it is accordingly believed 
that those who wish to make the trip can be accommodated without 
further delay. The $45 rate is not accorded on Army transports, 
assignments to which on Canal and Panama Railroad account are 
limited to employees and their dependents. 



Prices of Certain Supplies. 

The following are prices of supplies to individuals and companies, 
including the 25 per cent surcharge, and were effective December 1, 
1919: 



Commodity. 



Brass, bar 

Brass, sheet , 

Bronze, Tobin 

Cement, at Panama: 

Department of United States Government (includes surcLarge and 

Credit for empty bags returned 

Individuals and companies (includes surcharge and bap) 

Credit for empty bags returned 

Cement, at Colon: 

Department of United States Government (includes surcharge and 1 

Credit for empty bags returned 

Individuals and companies (includes surcharge and bags) 

Credit for empty bags returned 

Charcoal 

Copper, bar 

Gasoline, in drums (motor grade) 

Lead, sheet 

Lead, pig ._ 

Lumber, yellow pine or fir (except ceiling) 

Lumber, ceiling, 1" by 6" 

Lumber, flooring, 1" by 3" and 1" by 4" 

Metal, yellow 

Nuts, iron, machine, hexagonal 

Nuts, iron, machine, square 

Nails, common, wire 

Nails, galvanized 

Oakum, Navy, spun 

Oakum, Navy, unspun 

Fuel oil, at Balboa and Cristobal — in bulk: 

United States Army and Navy, and vessels operated by same 

Commercial vessels and individuals and companies 

Individuals and companies from tank No. 116, Balboa 

Fuel oil, at Balboa and Cristobal — in drums or barrels: 

United States Army and Navy and vessels operated by same 

Commercial vessels and individuals and companies 

Oils, greases, and lubricants: 

Oil, air compressor cylinder 

Oil, ammonia cylinder 

OH, burning, "Colza" 

Oil, cylinder, dark marine, "Texas" 

Oil, cylinder, ice machine, steam, "Garnett" 

Oil, engine, "Arctic" 

Oil, engine, "Cetus" — in tins 

Oil, engine. "Cetus" — in barrels 

(Ml, gas engine, "Texas," heavy — in drums 

Oil, gas engine, "Ursa" — in barrels : 

Oil, gas engine, "Ursa" — in cases 

Oil, ,*as, engine, "Algol" — in drams 

Oil, kerosene — in drums 

Oil, kerosene — in tins 

Oil, linseed, boiled 

OH, linseed, raw 

Oil, locomotive, engine 

Oil, lard 

Oil, marine engine, "Gargoyle" 



Unit. 



Lb. 




$0.50 


Lb. 




.75 


Lb. 




.4375 


Bag 




1.1925 


Bag 




.085 


Bag 




1.765 


Bag 




.28 


Bag 




1.0475 


Bag 




.085 


Bag 




1.58 


Bag 




.25 


Cwt. 




.9375 


Lb. 




.4375 


Gal. 




.4375 


Lb. 




.125 


Lb. 




.10 


M ft. B.M. 


81.25 


M ft. B.M. 


92.50 


Mft. 


3.M. 


96.25 


Lb. 




.50 


Lb. 




.225 


Lb. 




.1875 


Lb. 




.0625 


Lb. 




.10 


Lb. 




.2125 


Lb. 




.2125 


42-gal. bbl. 


*1.50 


42-gal. bbl. 


*1.50 


42-gal. bbl. 


♦1.54 


42-gal 


bbl. 


•1.75 


42-gal 


bbl. 


♦1.75 


Gal. 




.625 


Gal. 




.4*75 


Gal 




1.375 


Gal. 




.875 


Gal. 




1.00 


Gal. 




.7875 


Gal. 




.6875 


Gal. 




.6625 


Gal. 




.5375 


Gal. 




.8125 


Gal. 




.8725 


Gal. 




.5625 


Gal 




.25 


Gal 




.3125 


Gal. 




2.1875 


Gal 




2.5625 


Gal 




.35 


Gal 




2.375 


Gal 




1.125 



Price. 



*No surcharge. 



228 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Commodity. 



Oil, 

Oil. 

Oil, 

Oil, 

Oil, 

Oil, 

OH, 

Oil, 

Oil. 

Oil. 

Oil, 
Vaclite. 
Wax, lamp. 



marine engine, "Atlas" 

marine, dark, cylinder, "Vaccum," W. I. 

marine, engine, "Dolphin" 

marine, engine, "Texas" 

"Mineral Seal" 

nonliquid 

stationary engine , 

sperm , 

signal 

valve , 

car 



Grease, black, gear 

Grease, yellow, cup. No. 3 
Grease, yellow, cup. No. 5. 

Grease, rod, special 

Grease, tunnel, bearing. . . . 

Tallow 

Turpentine 

Turpentine substitute 

Vaseline. 



Paint, lead, white, dry 

Paint, lead, white, in oil 

Paint, zinc, white, dry 

Paint, zinc, white, in oil 

Paint, zinc, white leaded. 35 per cent in oil 
Rivets 



Rope, Manila, }" diameter 

Rope, Manila, 1" diameter 

Rope, Manila, i" diameter 

Rope, Manila, f " diameter 

Rope, Manila, j" diameter 

Rope, Manila, J" diameter 

Rope, Manila, 1 " diameter 

Rope, Manila, 1 \" diameter 

Rope, Manila, 1 \" diameter 

Rope, Manila, 1 }" diameter 

Rope, Manila, 2" diameter 

Rope, Manila. 2 \" diameter 

Rope, Manila, 3" diameter 

Rope, Manila. 3 J" diameter 

Steel, bar 

Steel spring 

Steel, cold rolled, rd 

Steel, sheet 

Steel, structural (angles, beams, etc.) . 
Tin, block. 



Tin, banca .... 

Tin, sheet 

Washers, cut . 
Waste, colored. 

Waste, white . 

Zinc, "toiler plate, \" bv 6" by 12' 



Unit 



Gal. 

Ga) 

Gal 

Gal 

Gal 

Lb 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Gal. 

Lb 

LV 

Lb 

Lb 

Lb 

Lb 

Lb 

Lb 

Gal. 

fid. 

Lb 

Lb 

Lb. 

Lb 

Lb. 

T,h 

Lb. 

Cft 

Cft 

Cft 

Cft 

Cft 

Cft 

Cft. 

Cft 

Cft 

Cft 

Cft 

Ctt. 

Cft. 

<*<. 

Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lt. 



Price. 



Item now on hand purchased at a cost over the price shown above will be given the purchase prise. 



$0,625 

1.125 

.4375 

75 

.3125 

10 

.375 

2.875 

1.375 

50 

.225 

.20 

.1125 

.075 

.125 

.1375 

.225 

.20 

.225 

2 50 

.4625 

.1125 

.125 

15 

.225 

.1875 

.1875 

.10 

.75 

1.625 

2 SO 

4 0625 

4.375 

6.25 

7.50 

12.1875 

16 5625 

26.25 

31 25 

47.50 

77.50 

102 50 

.0625 

.1375 

.0875 

.0675 

.0675 

75 

1 10 

25 

.10 

.2125 

.20 

.15 



Act ol Congress.— Entrance of Aliens into the United States. 

The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 28, 1919. 
Circular No. 600-68: 

The Act of Congress quoted below is published for the information of all concerned 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



An Act To regulate further the entry of Aliens into the United States. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That if the President shall find that the public safety requires 
that restrictions and prohibitions in addition to those provided otherwise than by 
this Act be imposed upon the entry of aliens into the United States, and shall 
make public proclamation thereof, it shall, until otherwise ordered by the President 
or Congress, be unlawful — 

(c) For any alien to enter or attempt to enter the United States except under such 
reasonable rules, regulations, and orders, and subject to such passport, vise, or other 
limitations and exceptions as the President shall prescribe; 

(b) For any person to transport or attempt to transport 'into the United States 
another person with knowledge or reasonable cause to believe that the entry of such 
other person is forbidden by this Act; 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 229 

(c) For any person knowingly to make any false statement in an application for a 
passport or other permission to enter the United States with intent to indi ce or 
secure the granting of such permission, either for himself or for another; 

(d) For any person knowingly to furnish or attempt to furnish or assist in furnishing 
to another a viseed passport or other permit or evidence of permission to enter, not 
issued and designed for such other person's use; 

(e) For any person knowingly to use or attempt to use any viseed passport or other 
permit or evidence of permission to enter not issued and designed for his use; 

(f) For any person to forge, counterfeit, mutilate, or alter, or cause or procure to 
be forged, counterfeited, mutilated, or altered, any passport, vise or other permit or 
evidence of permission to enter the United States; 

(g) For any person knowingly to use 01 attempt tc use or furnish to another for use 
any false, forged, counterfeited, mutilated, or altered passport, permit, or evidence 
of permission, or any passport, permit, or evidence of permission which, though origi- 
nally valid, has become or been made void or invalid. 

Sec. 2. That any person who shall willfully violate any of the provisions of this 
Act, or of any order or proclamation of the President promulgated, or of any permit, 
rule, or regulation issued thereunder, shall, upon conviction, be fined not more than 
$5,000, or, if a natural person, imprisoned for not more than five years, or both; and 
the officer, director, or agent of any corporation who knowingly participates in such 
violation shall be punished by like fine or imprisonment, or both; and any vehicle or 
any vessel, together with its or her appurtenances, equipment, tacMe, apparel, and 
furniture, concerned in any such violation, shall be forfeited to the United States. 

Sec. 3. That the term "United States" as used in this Act includes the Canal Zone 
and all territory and waters, continental or insular, subject to the jurisdiction of the 
United States. 

The word "person" as used herein shall be deemed to mean any individual, partner- 
ship, association, company, or ether unincorporated body of individuals, or corpora- 
tion, or body politic. 

Sec. 4. That in order to carry out the purposes and provisions of this Act the sum 
of $600,000 is hereby appropriated. 

Sec. 5. That this Act shall take effect upon the date when the provisions of the 
Act of Congress approved the 22d day of May, 1918, entitled "An Act to prevent in 
time of war departure from and entry into the United States, contrary to the public 
safety," shall cease to be operative, and shall continue in force and effect until and 
including the 4th day of March, 1921. 

Received by the President, October 29, 1919. 

[Note by the Department of State — -The foregoing act having been presented to 
the President of the United States for his approval, and not having been returned by 
him to the house of Congress in which it originated within the time prescribed by the 
Constitution of the United States, has become a law without his approval.] 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal 
post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights (telephone 286). Age limits do not apply to persons entitled to preference 
because of military or naval service: 

Scientific assistant. Lighthouse Service (male and female); $1,5GC a year; January 11, 1920; No. 
4; form 1312; age, 18 years but not 35 years. 

Aid. Division of Reptiles (male and female); $1,200 a year; January 11, 1920; No. 6; form 1312; 
age, not given. 

Senior cost accountant (male and female) ; and junior cost accountant (male and female) ; No. 155- 
amended, supplemental. This examination closed December 2, 1919. 

Minor clerk, Bureau of the Census (male and female); No. 477-amended, supplemental; January 
7, 1920; age. between 18 years and 45 years. 

Artist (male and female); §1,800 a year; December 30, 1919; No. 465-amended; form 1312; age, 

20 years and over. * 

* Special assistant, Legal Unit (male and female); $1,800 to $3,500 a year; December 16, 1919; No. 
537-amended, supplemental.* 

Specialist in cotton classing or marketing (male and female) ; $2,700 to $3,600 a year; December 23, 
1919; No. 561; form 2118; age, 25 years but not 50 years.* 

Mechanical engineer, qualified in internal combustion engine work (male and female); $3,000 to 
$3,600 a year; December 23, 1919; No. 568; form 2118; ape, no limits.* 
I Vocational adviser (male and female); $1,500 to $3,000 a year; December 30, 1919; No. 569; age, 

21 years but not 65 years.* 

Civil engineer (male); $2,500 to $3,000 a year; No. 574; age, 25 years but not 40 years; form 
B. I. A. 2.t 

Junior gas chemist (male and female); $1,500 a year; No. 576; form 1312; December 30, 1919; 
age, under 40 years.* 



230 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Mechanical and electrical engineer (male) ; $2,500 to $3,000 a year; No. 574; age, 25 yeara but not 
40 years; form B. I. A. 2. 

Mine inspector (male and female); $2,000 to $3,500 a year; No. 577; December 30, 1919;. form 
1312; age, 25 years but not 50 years.* 

Field assistant in insect control (male and female); $900 to $1,800 a year; No. 578; form 2118; 
age, under 60 years, t 

Mechanical draftsman. Patent Office (male and female); $1,000 a year; No. 582; December 30, 
1919; form 1312; age, 18 years and over.* 

Cotton technologist (male and female); $3,000 to $4,000 a year; December 30, 1919; form 2118; 
age, 30 years but not 45 years.* 

Physician (male and female); Panama Canal Service, $150 to $200 a month; January 11, 1920; 
form 1312; age, 22 years but not 31 years. 

Bacteriologist (male and female); $130 to $180 a month; January 6, 1920; form 1312; age, 18 
years and over.* 

Junior bacteriologist (male and female) ; $70 to $90 a month; January 6, 1920; form 1312; age, 18 
years and over.* 



♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

tNonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 



Deceased and Insane Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased or insane employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama 
Railroad Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any 
information which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, 
postal savings or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at 
the office of the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as 
possible. All claim- should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having 
a seal, and submitttd in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 

DECEASED. 



Name. 


Check 

No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of death. 


Daniel E. Barkley 


21825 
35932 


Jamaica 






November 18, 1919 








November 17, 1919. 


INSANE. 


Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of 
commitment. 




143611 








March 28, 1918. 















Danger in Filtering Gasoline through Chamois Skin. 

The Physiologist of the Division of Municipal Engineering has 
transmitted to The Panama Canal Record the following reply re- 
ceived from an inquiry which he addressed to the Bureau of Mines: 

Your letter of September 20, asking for information on the danger of filtering 
gasoline through chamois skin has been received. 

> The possibility of gasoline generating static electricity on being poured through 
chamois skin has been well substantiated by a number of accidents in different parts 
of the country. One of the Bureau chemists was present at a gasoline filling station 
when one of these fires occurred, and there is no question but that the fire originated 
from static electricity. It is therefore unsafe to use chamois skin for filtering gaso- 
line. The only advantage of this filtration would be to remove sediment and water 
from the gasoline, and this can be accomplished by the use of a properly constructed 
storage tank in practically all cases. Water and sediment will separate out of gaso- 
line in a very few hours, and storage tanks for gasoline are at present being constructed 
so that the outlet for the gasoline is two or three inches above the bottom of the tank, 
thus allowing the water and sediment to settle out. At intervals of three to six months 
the tanks are drained and the water and sediment which have accumulated are re- 
moved. If this procedure is followed there is no need of using any form of strainer 
for the gasoline. 

It undoubtedly would be found true that atmospheric conditions and the grade 
of gasoline would have some influence on the fire risk, but the use of chamois skin 
is certainly a dangerous and unnecessary practice. 



Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal. 

r The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," or "The Panama 
Canal, Washington, D. C." 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama;" in the 
United States, "Pancanal, Washington." 

Mail for 6hips passing through the Canal or touching at either of the terminal porta should b* 
addressed to "Cristobal, Canal Zone." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



231 



Official Circulars. 



Act of Congress. — Deficiency Appropriation, 
1920. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 26, 1919. 
Circular No. 600-67: 

The extract from an Act of Congress quoted 
below is published for the information of all con- 
cerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



AN ACT Making appropriations to supply de- 
ficiencies in appropriations for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1920, and prior fiscal years, 
and for other purposes. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United Slates of America in 
Congress assembled, That the following sums are 
appropriated out of any money in the Treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, to supply deficiencies 
in appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1920, and prior fiscal years, and for other pur- 
poses, namely: 

******* 

PANAMA CANAL. 

For civil government of The Panama Canal 
and Canal Zone, salaries of district judge $7,500, 
district attorney, $5,000, marshal $5,000, and for 
gratuities and necessary clothing for indigent 
discharged prisoners, $150,000. to continue avail- 
able until expended. 

******* 

Sec. 6. That this Act hereafter may be referred 
to as the "First Deficiency Appropriation Act, 
fiscal year 1920." 

Approved, November 4, 1919. 



Services of Employees as Jurors and Wit- 
nesses. 
The Panama Canal, 

Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 26, 1919. 
Circular No. 701-1: 

1. An employee of The Panama Canal or Pan- 
ama Railroad Company who attends a court of the 
Canal Zone as a juror or as a witness in a ciiminal 
case, orwho testifies before a court-martial in the 
Canal Zone or who serves on a coroner 's j ury or as a 
witness in a coroner's case, is entitled to the t'me 
actually present in court and the necessary time 
in traveling to and from court, taking into con- 
sideration the means of transportation available, 
without charge against such employee's leave or 
compensation. 

2. In like manner, an employee summoned as a 
witnessforThe Panama Canalor Panama Railroad 
Company, or other branch of the United States 
Government, in any civil suit shall also be entitled 
to his time without loss of leave or compensation. 
If summoned as a witness in any civil suit for the 
benefitof anyotherintc's! than those named, the 
time absent from his regular work shall be charged 
to the employee. An employee shall receive no 
pay for time consumed in traveling to and from 
court which is not a portion of his regular working 
hours 

3. Magistrates, clerks of district courts, coro- 
ners, judge advocates or trial officers of the court 
in the case of court-martial, will issue a certi 

of attendance, in duplicate, in accordance with 
the facts in each case, showing the time the em- 
ployee is actually in attendance, forwarding the 
original certificate to Bureau of Payrolls at Balboa 
Heights and delivering duplicate to the employee 
for presentation by him to his immediate superior. 
js 4. Employees who are attending court and 
and are entitled to time in accordance with the 
above instructions are to be shown as absent in 
the time book, by the timekeeper or the foreman 
who keeps the time, and the clerk who makes out 
the time roll will, upon presentation of proper 
certificate, credit the employee on the time roll 



with the actual time shown on the certificate and 
the time consumed going to and from court, at- 
taching the certificate to the time roll as his 
authority for allowing this time. No explanation 
of this time shall be given on the payroll. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Acting General Secretary, Bureau of Clubs 
and Playgrounds. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 8, 1919. 
To all concerned — Effective this date, and dur- 
ing the absence on leave of Mr. T. S. Booz, Mr. 
A. J. Scott will act as General Secretary, Bureau 
of Clubs and Playgrounds, in addition to his 
regular duties. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Misdirected Letters. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 8, 1919. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters 
have been received in the office of the Director 
of Posts, and may be o btained upon request of the 
addressees. Requests may be made by telephone, 
calling No. 182, Balboa: 
Archie, Frank Joyce, John W. 

Baumgardner, Miles Kilfoyle, Charles 
Knapp, Victoria 
Leonard, Miss Ruth 
McLean, Miss Margaret 
Mc- Mertz, Henry A. 

Redmond, Glenn William 
Reynolds, Mrs. F. 
Samuels, H. A. 
Shirley, W. H., Box 641 
Welter. Theodore 
Wickham, Rhemus 



Bello, John, Box 206 
Bovee, Elmer 
Brodtman, Mrs. M. A. 
Brown, Mrs. M. 

Neil 
Brown. V. R. 
Cullen, Joe M., Box 

636 
Cun-mings. E. O. H. 
Dedementie. Walter 



Examination for Colored Teachers. 

An examination will be held at the office of the 
Superintendent of Schools, Administration Build- 
ing, Balboa Heights. Friday and Saturday, Janu- 
ary 9 and 10, 1920, for colored teachers who desire 
to qualify for consideration for teaching positions 
in the Canal Zone colored schools as openings may 
occur from time to time. 

All interested should forward their credentials 
and applications for taking examination to the 
Division of Schools, Balboa Heights, C. Z., and 
be on hand for the examination on those two days, 
as another examination for this purpose is not 
being planned for this school year. 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maximum elevations of the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake, and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sea level, during the two weeks ending at 
midnight of Saturday, December 6, were as fol- 
lows : 



Date 


Chagres 
Vigia 


River 1 

Allia- 
juela 


Gatun 

Gam- 
boa 


Lake 
Gatun 


Mira- 
flores 
Lake 


Sun., Nov. 23.... 
Mon., Nov. - I 
Tues.. Nov. 25 . 
Wed., Nov. 26. . . 
Thurs.. Noi 27 
Fri., Nov. 28 
Sat., Nov. 2J.. 
Sun., Nov. 30... . 
Mini., i'ec. 1 . . . 
Tues.. Dec. 2 ... . 
Wed., Dec. 3 
Thurs., Dec. 4. . .. 
Fri., Dec. 5 


128.05 
127 55 
127.35 

127 2J 
132 I 
130 10 

128 80 
128 50 
129.00 
129.50 
(28 20 
133.50 
\:v: mi 
128.80 


92.97 
92.79 

92 12 
92.0." 
96 25 

94 22 

93 80 

94.36 

95 i 5 
96.85 
93.57 


87.12 
87.27 
87.13 
87.15 
87.15 
87 10 
s; 10 
<7 18 
87.08 
87. IS 
87.22 
87.06 
87 . 06 
87.10 


87.05 
87.10 
87.05 
87 04 
87.08 
87.06 
87 06 
87.11 
87.06 
87.11 
87.16 
87.11 
87.02 
87 01 


53.85 
53.94 
54.30 

53 95 
54.00 
53 . 79 
53.77 

54 60 
54.29 
54.12 
54 12 
54 49 
.54 21 
54 00 


Height of low watei 
to nearest foot . 


126.0 


91 









232 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Hotel Aspinwall Launch Schedule. 

Following is the schedule of laur ch service maintained by the Supply 
Department between Balboa and the Hotel Aspinwall on Taboga 
Island: 

Daily. 

Leave Port Captain's boat landing, near dock 19 10.00 a. m. 

Leave Taboga 8 . 00 a. m, 

Sundays and holidays. 

Leave dock 19, Balboa 10 . 00 a. m. 

Leave Taboga returning 11.30a. m. 

Leave dock 19, Balboa 4. 30 p. m. 

Leave Taboga returning 6. 00 p. m. 

Saturdays and days preceding holidays. 

Leave dock 19, Balboa 10 . 00 a. m. 

Leave Taboga returning 11.30 a. m. 

Leave dock 19, Balboa 6. 00 p. m. 

Returning from Taboga the following day 8 . 00 a. m. 

Fares {each way) — Employees, 35 cents; nonemployees, 60 cents; children of 
employees over 6 and under 12 years old, 25 cents; of nonemployees, 40 cents. 

Hotel patrons desiring to send trunks should arrange to have them delivered at the launch landing 
by 9.30 a. m., addressed to themselves, care of Hotel Aspinwall. Freight will be transported on the 
a. m. trip on Mondays. Thursdays, and Saturdays. 

For further information address Manager, Hotel Aspinwall, Taboga, via Balboa, C. Z. 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Ladies' Blouses. 

Philippine hand-embroidered, hand-sewn white blouses, made of fine material and 
in a number of beautiful patterns, will be placed on sale in the commissaries this 
week at $5.35 each. 



Linen. 

There is now on sale at Ancon, Balboa, Cristobal, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel com- 
missaries a shipment of liners, part of those now on order in England. Another 
shipment is expected to arrive before Christmas. Of the lot on hand, special bargains 
are offered in separate cloths. 

FcodstufTs frcm U. S. Navy. 

There were received on the steamship Panama, foodstuffs purchased from the U. S. 
Navy, consisting of the following: 300 cases apricots, 300 cases string beans, 500 
cases corn, 500 cases peas, 200 cases pineapple, 200 cases prunes, 500 cases tomatoes, 
300 cases peaches, 100 cases pears, 1,500 caees milk, 100 kegs mackerel, 20 barrels 
vinegar, 2,000 bags rice. 

Ribbons. 

There has recently been, received by the Commissary Division a shipment of ribbons 
ranging in prices from 35 cents to SI. 05 per yard. Inasmuch as these comprise 
Dresden flowered, Scotch plaid, and combination satin taffeta ribbons, they are 
desirable, not only for hair bows and sash ribbons, but for use in the making of bags 
and other accessories. 

Serviceable Christmas Gilts. 

Among the items recently received by the Commissary Division, which will be of 
considerable interest to the Christmas trade, are electric percolators, two styles, at 
$12.85 and $11.70; tea-ball teapots, silver-plated, at $3.60, silver-plated olive dishes 
and bonbon dishes, at $3.40 and $3.25, respectively, mayonnaise sets, two styles, 
at $3.60, round nickle-plated trays at $2.30, and mahogany trays at $4.50, $4.85, 
and $6.30. These are now on sale at Ancon, Balboa, Cristobal, Gatun, and Pedro 
Miguel commissaries. 

Smoker's Accessories. 

Of particular interest to the shopper who is desirous of obtaining some gift for 
the man of the family is the announcement that a shipment of smoking accessories 
has been received and placed on sale. These consist of tobacco jars of glass, with 
mahogany bases and decorated brass tops, priced at $3.90, ash trays in a good 
variety of styles and colors, ranging in prices from $1.20 to $8.95, and smoking sets 
consisting of cigarette jars and ash trays on mahogany bases, priced at $5.35. Ancon, 
Balboa, Cristobal, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel commissaries now have these for sale. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6. P'18, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act oi March 3, 1S79. 





Volume XIII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 17, 1919. No. 18. 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing 
from Port of Cristobal for Week Ending December 13, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 



Middlebury 

Huasco 

Northern Pacific 

Crynssen 

San Jose 

Laura C.Hall 

Metapan 

Point Judith 

Panama 

Cauca 

Gen. Geo. W. Goethals 

Carrillo 

Atenas 

Jamaica 

Imperial 

Middlebury 

Allianca 

Urubamba 



Line or charterer. 



Panama Railroad Cattle Industry.. 

Chilean Steamship Line 

United States Army ; 

Royal Dutch West India Mail 

Pacific Mail Steamship Line 

Pacific Metals Corporation 

United Fruit Company 

Pacific Mail Steamship Line 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. . 
Pacific Steam Navigation Co.. . . . . 

Panama Railroad Steamship Line. . 

United Fruit Company 

United Fruit Company 

Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Chilean Steamship Line 

Panama Railroad Cattle Industry.. 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line. . 
Peruvian Steamship Line 



Arrived. 



December 8. . 
December 8. . 
December 8. . 
December 8. . 
December 8. . 



December 9. . 
December 9. . 
December 10. 
December 11. 
December 11. 
December 11. 
December 12. 
December 13. 



Departed. 



December 7.. 
December 8. . 
December 8. . 
December 10. 



December 13. 
December 11. 
December 10. 
December 11. 



December 11. 
December 11. 



December 13. 



Cargo 



Discharged Laded. 



Tom. 



196 

520 

7 

993 

25 



1,090 

2,001 

1,121 

2 

632 
1,616 

450 
2, 226 i 



Ton*. 

7 
756i 

2 
432 



61 

118 

65 

3,465 



129 



748* 



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded ty Vessels Entering and Citanng 
from Port of Balboa for Week Ending December 13, 1919. 



Name of vessel. 


Line or charterer. 


Arrived. 


1'eparted. 


Car 
Discharged 


go- 
Laded. 




Pacific Mail Steamship Company. . 

Pacific Metals Corporation 

United States Navy 


December 6. . . 
December 7.. . 
December 8. . . 




Tons. 


Tom. 
631 


Laura C.Hall 


December 8.. . 


49 


1,000 


George Washington. . . 

Jamaica 

Laura C.Hall 




200 
230 




Pacific Steam Navigation Co 

Pacific Me*als Corporation 


December 10.. 
December 13.. 


December 10.. 


23 



Distribution of Cargo in October. 

In the publication last week of the Governor's report to the Secre- 
tary of War of Canal operations in October, tables showing the 
ports from which cargo was shipped and to which it was destined 
were omitted to make room for other matter, and are published this 
week, on pages 236, 237, 238, and 239. 

The "Advance" Aground -ayes. 

The steamship Advance of tin- mship Line 

went ashore off Aux ( tin 

ber 11, and has not been fl 
line, sailing from Cristol al, D< < i 
ordered to make for the Advance, ai 
to arrive in Habana December 1 7 
sold by The Canal to dredging intei ests . en ordered to pro- 

ceed with all speed from Habana to A i G yes. The Advance has 
been plying between New York and Haitian n rts. 



f . . liti, on Decem- 

I lli i the same 

York, has been 

., iiich was due 

ck Sreaker Vulcan 



Postal Address of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, Lanal Zone,' 
Canal, Washington, D. C." 



or "The Panama 



234 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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236 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



237 





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8,147 

15,927 

1,950 

25,566 

6S5 

12,773 

1,066 

1,547 

11,200 

8,320 

1,944 

1,568 

2,200 

3,598 

30,167 

8,426 

3,115 

9,492 

799 

6,600 

6,080 

9,900 

1,579 

718 

2,209 

33,674 

3,237 

9,931 

6,900 

32,246 

16,440 

406 

7,870 

14,530 

34,587 

20,169 

6,500 

1,154 

29,849 

12,536 

8,394 

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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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6,784 

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11,402 

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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



239 



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105,565 

16,786 

5,954 

45,111 

300 

4,200 

2,400 

16,428 


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240 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



A New Issue of Metal Checks. 

A new metal check, octagonal in shape, is being issued to all 
employees of The Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad and change 
of records will be effective January 1, 1920. 

December pay receipts will, however, bear the old metal check 
numbers and employees should retain their old metal checks until 
after next pay day. 

Weather Conditions in November, 1919. 

The rainfall for the month was decidedly below normal, Taboga Island and the 
Quipo station on the Trinidad River being the only stations where an excess occurred. 
Many of the stations had the lowest November rainfall for years of record. Total9 
ranged from 3.50 inches at Gamboa to 15.35 inches at the Quipo station The greatest 
amount of rainfall on any one day was 2.71 inches, at Pedro Miguel on November 30. 

The estimated rainfall over the Gatun Lake watershed was 9.60 inches, compared 
with a 9-year mean of 14.97 inches, and over the Chagres River basin above Alhajuela 
it was 9.15 inches, as compared with an 18-yea; mean of 18.41 inches. 

The air temperature was approximately normal everywhere except at Colon, where 
it was above normal. The relative humidity and daytime cloudiness were below 
normal, while the evaporation and temperature of the sea were generally above nor- 
mal. The atmospheric pressure was above normal on the Pacific Coast and below on 
the Atlantic, while the wind movement was just the reverse. 

A number of fogs were observed at interior stations, all of which lifted or were 
dissipated by 8.30 a. m. 

Three seismic disturbances of close origin were recorded at Balboa Heights during 
the month, 2 on the 1st and 1 on the 10th. The quake recorded on the evening of 
the 1st was of sufficient intensity to be felt locally. 

Galun Lake hydrology. — Mean elevation of Gatun Lake was 86.81 feet above sea 
level; maximum 87. 11 feet, on the 30th; minimum 86.30 feet, on the 1st; evaporation 
from Gatun Lake surface, 4.558 inches; rainfall on Gatun Lake drainage basin, 9.60 
inches; total yield cf Gatun Lake watershed, 7.33 inches on the watershed. The 
total yield amounted to 76 per cent of the rainfall. 

A summaiy Oi the weather conditions for tl e month is given in the following table: 





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<D 


Precipitation. 


Wind. 
















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Heights. .. 


29.846 79.1 


90 


Nov. 12 70 


Nov. 14 


84 5 


4.97 


10.10 


17 


4,327 


N. 


32 


N.E. 


Nov. 21 


Colon 


29.844 80.0 


89 


Nov. 8 72 


Nov. 8 


80 6 


6.63 


21.04 


22 


7,197 


N. 


33 


N. 


Nov. 28 






78.9 
80.0 


90 


Nov.2fi* 68 


Nov. 14 
Nov. 16 




3.50 
7.19 


11.87 
19.64 


20 
25 


3.329 
4,463 


N.E. 

N. 


26 
23 


N.E. 
S. 


Nov. 21 


Gatun 




87 Nov. 8| 73 


Nov. a 


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es. 























Average Daily Attendance by Years— Canal Zone Public Schools. 

The average daily attendance at the public schools of the Canal 
Zone has been as follows: 



School year ending June 30. 


White. 


Colored. 


Total. 


1905 






150 


1906 


107 

167 

385 

539 

682 

838.8 

979.9 
1,029.1 

967.7 
1,006.3 
1,065.1 
1,212.6 
1,322.9 
1,423.3 
1,565.8 


i ,666 

971 

765 

784 

577 

556.1 

733.7 

799.0 

715.2 

755.9 

436.3 

496.6 

640.3 

756.2 

870 


1,107 


1907 


1,138 


1908 


1,150 


1909 


1,287 


1910 


1,259 


1911 


1,394.1 


1912 


L713.I 


1913 


1,828.1 


1914 


1,682.9 


1915 


1,762. J 


1916 


1,501.4 


1917 


1,709.2 


1918 


1,963.3 


1919 


2,179.8 


October, 1919 


2,435.8 







THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



241 



The attendance has been charted, as shown below. The Super- 
intendent of Schools has supplied the following explanatory notes: 

The average daily attendance is the average number of pupils in actual attendance 
at school each school day. It is found by dividing the total number of days that all 
pupils have attended school by the total number of days taught. It is always less 
than the number of pupils enrolled. For instance, the net enrollment for October, 
1919, was: White, 1,657; colored, 973; total, 2,630; whereas the average daily 
attendance was: White, 1,565.8, colored, 870; total, 2,435.8. The difference is 
caused by irregular attendance. 

It will be noted that the graphs for bcth white and colored schools for 1911, 1912, 
1913, 1914, and 1915 and for 1917, 1918, and 1919 to date are very similar and almost 
parallel. Except for the drop in 1914, due to reduction of force consequent to 
establishment of the permanent organization on April 1, 1914, the line for white 
schools takes a constant upward direction due to children of employees becoming of 
school age and to the provision of additional family quarters. 

For the same cause the line for colored schools from 1916 to date takes a constant 
upward direction. Up to 1916 the line for colored schools takes a very erratic course. 
The high point for colored schools for 1906 is due principally to compulsory attend- 
ance ordinances enacted at that time by the municipalities. The slight decline in 
1907 is due to decreased effectiveness of the attendance ordinances and the more 
marked decline in 1908 to no attempt to enforce them. The decline in 1910 is not 
accounted for unless it is the result of depopulation. The slight decline in 1911 
is due to the Cristobal colored school being destroyed by fire on March 23, 1911. 
The decline in 1914 is due, in common with that in the white schools, to reduction 
of force consequent to establishment of permanent organization April 1, 1914. 
The marked decline in 1916 is due to withdrawal of the privilege of free tuition for 
children of alien employees. not residents of the Canal Zone. 




CaDic Auurcss ol lne Panama Caiuu. 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama;" in tin 
United States, "Pancanal, Washington." 

Mail for ships passing through the Canal or touching at either of the terminal porta should be 
addressed to "Cristobal, Canal Zone." 



242 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Notaries Public. 

The following is a list of the Notaries Public in the Canal Zone: 



BALBOA. 

Adams, R. H., Balboa shops, August 18, 1922. 
Attaway, E. F., Clubhouse, Balboa, October 28, 

1921. 
Hyde. W. H., Port Captain's office, June 14, 1920. 
Illwitzer, P. G., Balboa storehouse, October 11, 

1920. 
Kalar, John D., Port Captain's office, July 21, 

1920. 

BALBOA HEIGHTS. 

Pender, W. I., Administration Building, room 

237, July 30, 1922. 
Hammer, H. H., Property and Requisition Bureau, 

March 31, 1920. 
LeMire, G., post office, April 30, 1920. 
Margon, C. C, Administration Building, room 

237, August 8, 1920. 
Murray, P. E., Claims Bureau, Administration 

Building, June 25, 1920. 
Wang, Frank H., Bureau of Posts, April 30, 1920. 
Stephens, Fred H., survey office, April 30, 1920. 
Taylor, Richard G., survey office, January 8, 

1921. 
Vanderslice, Geo. J., Administration Building, 

room 237, November 6, 1921. 
Wempe, Henry J., Administration Building, room 

204, November 30, 1921. 
Woodruff, B. C, Accounting Department, Febru- 
ary 6, 1921. 
Singleton, C. C, District Quartermaster's office, 

April 26, 1922. 

ANCON. 

Boyd, Oscar S., Municipal Engineering Division, 

July 30, 1922. 
Dwelle, R. L., Clubhouse, Ancon, October 28, 

1921. 
Ohlson, Elmer F., Ancon Hospital, April 30, 

1920. 
Sheibley, F. H., District Court, November 1, 

1920. 
Sherrit, Nye B„ Ancon post office, April 21, 

1921. 
Williams, H. E., public stenographer, Tivoli, 

January 10, 1921. 
Woolworth, P. T., Clubhouse, Ancon, October 

28, 1921. 

COROZAL. 

Ilgen, W. F. t station agent, December 3, 1922. 

PEDRO MIGUEL. 

Kinaman, Frank, station agent, April 8, 1920. 



PARAISO. 

Kennedy, L. F., post office, April 21, 1921. 

CULEBRA. 

Thornton, H. C, station agent, December 3, 
1922. 

EMPIRE. 

Cooper, H. J., station agent, December 3, 1922. 

SUMMIT. 

Wood, A. C, station agent, December 3, 1922. 

GAMBOA. 

Freehan, P. A., station agent, December 3, 1922. 

MONTE LIRIO. 

Collins, E. G., station agent, December 3. 1922. 

GATUN. 

Hanrahan, T. J., station agent, December 3, 

1922. 
Davis, Lee, Clubhouse,' Gatun, October 28, 1921. 
DeLange, William, Electrical Division. December 

12, 1922. 

CRISTOBAL. 

Cheatham, W. B., District Court, October 22, 
1921. , 

Daniels, W. L., Building Division, March 25, 
1921. 

Dwyer, J. W., Commissary Division, September 

27, 1921. 

Hansli. A. J., coaling plant, October 16, 1921. 
Hearne, Dr. C. A., quarantine office, March 22, 

1920. 
Hulsebosch, P. C, Cristobal shops, August 28, 

1921. 
Jackson, J. J., Commissary Division, April 30, 

1920. 
MacSparran, E. S., Receiving and Forwarding 

Agency, October 16, 1921. 
McCarthy, J. S., Cattle Industry, Cristobal, 

February 10, 1922. 
Mitchell, J. A., customs office, March 31, 1922. 
Rattiner, W. H., Commissary Division, February 

18, 1921. 
Tyson, Arthur E., Clubhouse, Cristobal, October 

28, 1921. 

Yearick, G. L., Commissary Division, March 22, 

1920. 
Stone, W. H., Mechanical Division, September 4, 

1922. 
Flood, Arthur, customs office, November 15, 

1922. 



Victory Bonds for Sale. 

The Liberty Loan Committee is in a position to accept a limited 
number of additional applications for 4f per cent notes pi the Victory 
Liberty Loan, to replace cancellations by employees leaving the service, 

Payment at par value, plus the accrued interest, may be made in 
cash, either to the Collector, Balboa Heights, or the Deputy Collector, 
Cristobal. No applications for payroll deduction can be accepted. 

Children Insufficiently Nourished. 

The Chief Health Officer of The Panama Canal makes the follow- 
ing statement: 

It is a fact worthy of consideration by every parent, that a large proportion of 
school children are underweight and malnourished. Investigation shows that at 
least a third of the children of the United States are so afflicted, and the recent 
physical examination of school children of the Canal Zone discloses that even the 
children of Government employees here are too frequently below par because of 
improper feeding. 

It need not cost any more to feed your children the food they should have than 
it is now costing, and a careful attention to their requirements may result in a better 
balanced ration and a quick change to a condition of normal health and growth. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 243 

Employees' Free Entry Requests. 

Employees in submitting request for free entry and reduced freight 
rate on form No. 164 sometimes type their names on the requests and 
neglect to sign the originals, making it necessary to return requests 
for written signature. The original of these requests must always be 

signed in ink. , 

Visit of the "New Zealand" and the "Uruguay." 
The British battle cruiser New Zealand arrived at Balboa in the 
morning of December 13 from San Diego, and tied up at Pier 18 until 
the morning of December 16, when she started through the Canal on 
her way to the island of Jamaica. The Uruguayan torpedo boat 
Uruguay arrived at Cristobal on December 10 from Port Limon, 
passed through the Canal to Balboa, and tied up, clearing for the 
south on December 16, bound for Montevideo, via Magellan. Dur- 
ing the stay of the vessels the personnel were entertained by the people 
of the Isthmus, and receptions were given aboard the ships. 

Contagious Diseases to be Reported. 

In connection with the appearance of cases of chicken pox, whoop- 
ing cough, and other contagious diseases in the Balboa district, the 
Chief Health Officer calls attention to the necessity of reporting such 
diseases promptly. The following is quoted from the Executive Order 
governing this matter: 

"Every physician, druggist, school teacher, clergyman, midwife, nurse, head of 
a family, or other person in attendance on or in charge of any one sick or injured, 
having knowledge of the existence in any district of the Canal Zone of any of the 
diseases hereinafter named, shall immediately report the same to the District Physician 
or Sanitary Inspector. The diseases required to be so reported are: 

Anthrax Plague 

Chicken pox Puerperal septicemia 

Cholera, Asiatic Relapsing fever 

Diphtheria (croup) Rubella (Rotheln) 

Dysentery Scarlet fever 

Epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis Smallpox 

Erysipelas Tetanus 

Glanders Tuberculosis (of any organ) 

Infectious diseases of the eye Typhus fever 

Leprosy 1 yphoid fe^ er 

Malarial fever Whooping cough 

Measles Yellow fever 

"Any person who fails to make due report, as required by this order, of any of the 
above-enumerated diseases shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon con- 
viction thereof shall be punished by a fine not exceeding $2i>, or by imprisonment in 
jail not exceeding 30 days, or by both fine and imprisonment in the discretion of the 
court." 

Quarters and Land at Las Cascadas. 

Carpenters are now engaged in renovating buildings at Las Cascadas 
for rental to West Indians, and applications for assignment to quarters 
and land may be placed through the district quartermaster in any of the 
quartermaster districts. The supervision of the settlement is to be 
vested in the district quartermaster at Pedro Miguel, who has so far 
received 4 applications for assignment. The conditions of assignment 
are set forth in the following circular and appended form of revocable 
license : 

Assignments to Houses in Las Cascadas. 
The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 21, 1919. 
To all concerned — For the purpose of providing homes for silver employees who are 
temporarily out of work, where they can support their families at a nominal expense 
and will not be subject to the general rules in regard to vacating quarters when em- 
ployment is terminated, assignments will be made to houses in Las Cascadas under 
the following conditions: 



244 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

1. Assignments will be made by the district quartermaster at Pedro Miguel. 
Applications will be accepted at any of the district quartermaster's offices and 
forwarded by the district quartermaster to the district quartermaster at Pedro 
Miguel. 

2. Assignments will made in the following order: 

(c) To employees with families who have been laid off within the last 6 months and 
who hold satisfactory clearances. 

(b) To employees who are not now occupying Panama Canal quarters but who have 
filed applications for quarters and who have five members in the family. Assignments 
will be made in accordance with date of application for regular quarters. 

(c) To employees whose occupation is of a temporary nature. Assignment in thi9 
case will be made in accordance with date of application for quarters at Las Cascadas. 

(d) To nonemployees who are physically capable of performing work on the Canal. 

3. Before assignment is made the applicant will be required to sign a form of 
revocable license, copy of which is published below. 

4. Forms of revocable license may be obtained from the district quartermaster at 
Pedro Miguel, who will see that